Presenters

Math and Science Teachers' Conference

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  • Attendee
    • Individual = $150
    • Groups of 3 or more = $125/ each
  • Vendor
    • $350

Zach Beam has taught at Newcastle High School in Newcastle, Wyoming, for two years and previously worked for the U.S. Forest Service Job Corps’ Education Department. He has presented on using Google to manage a paperless classroom and science inquiry to encourage student interests. Beam earned a bachelor’s in education from Black Hills State University, and a master’s in science education from Western Governors University.

Reid Bauer started teaching outdoor science education in 2001 and has taught in Ohio, Michigan, and New York, joining the faculty at Teton Science Schools in 2012. He is currently the instructional technology specialist for Teton Science Schools and holds a bachelor’s of art in biology from Grinnell College.

Leslie Cook is the director of educator development for Teton Science Schools, where she has worked for the past nine years. In this role, she oversees and conducts professional development for teachers around Wyoming, across the United States, and internationally.

Jodi Cargo-Wyllie has been an elementary science facilitator for the past 13 years and the science director for Campbell County School District in Gillette, Wyoming, for the past 11 years. Before that, she taught sixth grade for eight years. She has been involved in a math and science partnership grant that focused on developing curriculum for the new science standards for the past five years. She received a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from the University of Wyoming and a master’s degree in K-12 masters of education from South Dakota State University in Brookings, South Dakota.

Tom Cubbage has been teaching biology, speech, and argumentation for the last 28 years. He is the current National Science Teachers Association director for Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho. He has been involved in the Next Generation Science Standards and Montana adaptation. He attended Northwest College in Powell Wyoming, has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education from Eastern Montana College and a master’s degree in science education from Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana.

Megan Diede has taught second grade for seven years at schools including Rapid City School District in Rapid City, South Dakota and Campbell County School District in Gillette, Wyoming. She has been involved in a math and science partnership grant that focused on developing curriculum for the new science standards for the last two years.

Sharla Dowding is a Wyoming Department of Education science consultant and has taught high school science for 26 years. As a member of the National Science Teachers Association, she has served as District XV director, a delegate to the National Congress on Science Education as nominations chair, and on several committees and judging panels. Dowding received National Board Certification in 2007 and is a lifetime member of the Wyoming Science Teachers Association. She earned a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from Chadron State College, and an Ed.D. from Montana State University.

Amber French is the manager for the Science Depot, the center for the Natrona County School District No. 1’s K-8 science kits. She prepares and re-creates science kits for teachers to use in the classroom. French presents and teaches the kit lesson to elementary students at NCSD. She has a bachelor’s degree in science education and an endorsement in library media.

Anne Gaspers is the public education coordinator for Donor Alliance, an organ procurement organization. She manages the transplantation science program, trains driver license office employees about how to talk to the public about organ and tissue donation, and coordinates speaking events with community groups. Before joining Donor Alliance in 2016, she taught Spanish and English as a Second Language at Thornton High School and Emily Griffith Technical College in Denver. She received a bachelor’s degree in Spanish from the University of Northern Colorado and a master’s degree in international educational development from Columbia University.

Jessica Haas is a program manager and instructor for the Yellowstone Forever Institute, the nonprofit partner of Yellowstone National Park. She worked for three years researching wolverines and also taught math and science at Foothills School of Arts and Sciences in Boise, Idaho. She is certified through the National Association of Interpretation as a certified interpretive guide, host, and trainer. She received her bachelor’s degrees in both geology and theater before earning her graduate certificate in environmental education at the McCall Outdoor Science School.

Teddi Hofmann is the K-14 project coordinator for the University of Wyoming College of Engineering and Applied Science. This is her third year in the position where she connects with schools from across the state to expose students and teachers to the breadth of opportunities available in the fields of engineering and applied science through hands-on learning. Hofmann received her bachelor’s degree in environmental geography from Colgate University and a master’s degree in natural science education from the University of Wyoming.

Terra Hernandez is an English language arts/fine and performing arts consultant. She spent 15 years teaching in Colorado, Nevada, and Wyoming. Her passion centers on building relationships with teachers, students, and constituents to successfully integrate the arts into their curriculum. Hernandez received her bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Northern Colorado and master’s degree from Lesley University.

London Jenks is a high school science educator and director of technology at Hot Springs County High School in Thermopolis, Wyoming. He is a National Board Certified Teacher, Google Certified Teacher, National School Board Association 20 to Watch Educator, and Knowles Science Teaching Foundation Teaching Fellow. Jenks has a bachelor’s in physics education BYU, Idaho, a master’s in education Leadership, Western Governors University and is national board certified.

Jeff Leone is a Transplantation Science educator who currently serves the Colorado and Wyoming communities. He is a kidney transplant recipient as well as a retired science teacher from Denver Public Schools. Leone fulfills his passion for organ, eye, and tissue donation advocacy and awareness through his current role as an educator, participating in the Transplant Foundation. He received a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Southern California and a master’s degree in education from the University of Kansas.

Barb Marquer is the supervisor of standards at the Wyoming Department of Education and previously the Science/CVE consultant. Her teaching career spans 15 years, nine years as an instructor and director of the Wyoming National Guard’s STARBASE program. She earned her bachelor’s degree in nursing from Loyola University, secondary science teaching certification from Regis University, and master’s degree in learning and technology from Western Governors University.

Joe Meyer has taught math for 24 years and physics for three years and is a current nominee for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. He was a very active component of the SIMMS-IM math textbook development and dissemination for six years. Meyer has a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics teaching from Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, is national board certified, and has most of a mathematics master’s degree completed.

Tim Miner started Modern Steader in 2014, an edible education company committed to helping students shape healthy lifelong relationships with food. Modern Steader is the creator of the Edible Learning Lab, an immersive get-your-hands-dirty education program for K-12. He has a degree in business from Juniata College.

Sylvia Parker coordinates the Science and Mathematics Teaching Center at the University of Wyoming and is a senior lecturer in the college of arts and sciences. She has worked as a teacher, researcher, and facilitator providing professional development and technical assistance to teachers, schools, and communities seeking to create high-quality public schools. Her work has focused on rural education, place-based learning, community development, and issues of social justice. She has a bachelor’s degree from Colorado State University and master’s degree from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Leah Ritz is the director of education at the Science Zone with a master’s degree in natural science from the University of Wyoming with a concentration in natural science education. For the last seven years, she has been teaching a number of out-of-school-time science and technology programs in Wyoming and Minnesota. She has experience developing and implementing engineering design-based and digital media programming for middle school youth, and curriculum that integrates natural science, natural history, and art in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. At the Science Zone, Ritz is focused on developing integrated, hands-on, inquiry-based STEAM programming.

Doug Scribner has taught science at Newcastle High School in Newcastle, Wyoming, for the last 11 years. Scribner is a National Science Teachers Association member and has presented workshops on science inquiry, one-to-one laptop strategies, and implementing Google in the classroom. He has been a member of the Bioenergy Alliance Network of the Rockies education project for two years, working to create educational materials related to biofuels and bioenergy. He earned a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Wyoming and a master’s degree in education from Chadron State College.

Timothy F. Slater is the University of Wyoming Excellence in Higher Education endowed chair of science education. He is a senior web blogger for the Society of College Science Teachers, an award-winning teacher, author of more than 100 peer-reviewed articles, and teaches advanced instructional strategies and cognition and learning graduate courses at the University of Wyoming. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina, a master’s degree from Clemson University, and two bachelor’s degrees from Kansas State University.

Jessica Steinbrenner is currently the assessment supervisor for the Wyoming Department of Education. She taught high school mathematics in Wyoming for six years before joining the department. Steinbrenner is currently working on a master’s degree in school counseling through the University of Texas at Tyler. She earned her master’s degree in mathematics with an emphasis in mathematics education at Montana State University, and her bachelor’s degree in secondary education with an emphasis in mathematics at the University of Wyoming.

Kathy Stephens has taught for 33 years at Campbell County School District in Gillette, Wyoming. She is currently teaching a combination first- and second-grade classroom, but has taught second grade for over 25 years. She received a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from South Dakota State University in Brookings, South Dakota. Stephens has been involved in a math and science partnership grant focused on developing curriculum for the new science standards for the past year.

James Stith has taught science at Newcastle High School in Newcastle, Wyoming, for five years. Stith is a National Science Teachers Association member and has presented workshops on science inquiry, one-to-one laptop strategies, and implementing Google in the classroom. Stith earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Black Hills State University and is working on a master’s degree.

Erin Stoesz is a current Wyoming State Science Fair director, has been a science fair competitor, judge, volunteer, and a director for over 10 years. As a competitor in the 1990’s, she represented Wyoming at the International Science and Engineering Fair for three years, where she received nine awards for her geology research. In addition to research, Stoesz has experience teaching K-14 students, developing professional online geology curriculum, copy editing scientific publications, managing grants, and doing geology consulting. She received a bachelor’s degree in Celtic music and geology from the University of Wyoming, and a master’s degree in geology from Indiana University.

Jill Stringer is currently the Math/STEM consultant at the Wyoming Department of Education. She was a high school mathematics teacher for 22 years before joining the WDE. She earned her bachelor’s degree in elementary education at the University of Wyoming, a master’s degree in educational leadership from Grand Canyon University, and a master’s degree in mathematics from Northern Colorado University.

Becky Underwood has taught at Kelly Walsh High School in Casper, Wyoming, for 30 years, including basic arithmetic through AP Calculus BC as well as multiple programming languages (including AP computer science). She was selected as a state finalist for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science in Mathematics, is a Siemens Award for Advanced Placement Teacher Winner, and is a TI Regional Instructor. Underwood earned her bachelor’s degree in mathematics education from the University of Wyoming and has earned 60 plus graduate credits from numerous colleges and universities. Her certifications include both mathematics and computer science.

Bertha Vazquez has been teaching science for 27 years. She has bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Miami and a master’s degree in science education from Florida International University. Nationally board certified, Vazquez is the recipient of several honors, including the 2014 Samsung’s $1500,000 Solve for Tomorrow Contest and NEEF’s Charles Bartlett National Environmental Award in 2009, Miami-Dade’s Science Teacher of the Year in 1997, 2008 and 2017, and was also a finalist for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching in 2015. She is this year’s winner of the National Association of Biology Teachers Evolution Education Award.

Michele Wistisen is the Casper Planetarium director and supervisor. She has shared her methods for teaching phases of the moon at the National Science Teachers Association conference and numerous planetarium conferences. She was selected as the National Space Foundation teacher liaison in 2012. Wistisen is an ELED, astronomy camp director, NASA product reviewer, regional science fair coordinator, NSTA presenter, American Planetarium Operator in Italy, and Wyoming Math and Science Conference presenter. She earned a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Wyoming.

Yellowstone National Park Education Rangers are often former teachers and are always life-long learners and students of the natural world who have the passion for sharing the wonders of Yellowstone with others.

Andrew Young spent some time working at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and Los Alamos National Laboratory before arriving at Casper College in 2005. He has taught physics and astronomy courses. Young serves as the Casper College representative for the Wyoming NASA Space Grant Consortium, is a board member for the Tate Geological Museum, and is the Wyoming RadNet systems operator for the Environmental Protection Agency. He earned a bachelor’s degree in astronomy and physics from Boston University and a master’s and doctorate in astrophysics from the University of Minnesota.