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GERMAN
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German at Casper CollegeTEXTBOOKS IN USE AT CASPER COLLEGE:

  • German 1010 (first semester):
    See instructor.
  • German 1020 (second semester):
    Kontakte, 7th edition, Tschirner/Nikolai/Terrell.
    ISBN 978-0-07-338634-8
  • German 2030 (third semester):
    Kontakte, 7th edition, Tschirner/Nikolai/Terrell.
    ISBN 978-0-07-338634-8
  • German 2040 (fourth semester):
    See instructor.

 


STUDENT TESTIMONIALS:

“The different activities kept my interest! I didn't usually feel put on the spot but included. I feel that out of all my classes this is the one I've learned the most from…”
– a German 1010 student (Fall 2012)

German“Herr Ewing is the epitome of a perfect instructor. He balances the class unfathomably well with challenge, engagement, practicality and enjoyment. My German speaking, writing, and reading capabilities are more fluent than ever…”
–a German 2030 student (Fall 2012)

“Danke! Loved this class!”
–a German 1010 student (Spring 2012)

“This class was very well prepared. Each lesson was well thought out and explained. The course material was challenging, but very well put together. GREAT instructor.”
–a German 1010 student (Spring 2012)

“German 1020 has given me a better understanding, not only how to speak/read/write better using German vocab and grammar, but also how to work with what I already know to work through or around problems that confronted me when learning the material, also I liked the songs, they're the catchiest way to increase vocab!”
–a German 1020 student (Spring 2012)

“Mr. Ewing has created an engaging and welcoming environment in his classes - they're a great deal of fun, but I also feel that his methods of teaching effectively challenge the student…”
–a German 1020 student (Spring 2012)

“I learned a lot from this class and often found myself speaking German to myself rather than English, which I think is awesome. Group activities I found helpful…”
German–a German 2030 student (Fall 2011)

“Once again, Herr Ewing provided enough enthusiasm & variation to make this 2 hour, evening class not only tolerable but fun.”
–a German 1020 student (Fall 2011)

“Herr Ewing finds a way to bring the class material to your level while at the same time making you reach past your comfort zone. He's a very patient instructor that truly does love what he does, and it shows greatly in his classes. He is more than willing to work with you on your assignments if you're struggling. I can honestly say that even though I have to get up early for his class I never leave feeling like I've wasted my morning, in fact I always leave wanting more. Herr Ewing has been probably the best instructor I've had here at CC, and that's saying something in that most instructors I have had at CC have been incredible! The only thing I am disappointed about is that I am graduating this semester and may not be able to continue on to the next level of German with him, but if the chance arises I would not hesitate to do it!”
–a German 1020 student (Spring 2013)

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FUN FACTS:

  • Germany has the world’s 4th largest economy after the U.S., China, and Japan.
    (As measured by Gross Domestic Product, 2012 statistics from the International Monetary Fund.)
  • There are six countries that use German as an official language: Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein, and Belgium.
  • GermanyThere are approximately 120 million German-speakers in the world.
  • German is the most widely spoken native language in the European Union.
  • Germany has about 80 million people and is about the size of the state of Montana
    (which has 1 million people, for comparison).
  • Of Germany’s 80 million people, about 16 million are of foreign/immigrant descent (first and second generation, including mixed heritage and ethnic German repatriates and their descendants). People of Turkish descent are the largest minority group and make up 4-5% of the country’s population.
  • German-Americans are the largest ancestry group in Wyoming; 25.9% of Wyomingites have German heritage. German was the top reported ancestry group in 23 U.S. states in the 2000 census.
  • German is one of the only world languages that still capitalizes all nouns, all the time—even in the middle of a sentence!
  • German nouns (people, places, things, concepts) are all “gendered.” That is to say, they are all either masculine, feminine, or neutral!
  • The German alphabet has 30 letters (all of the “regular” 26, plus ä, ö, ü, and ß).
  • There are many dialects of German! Generally, “Low German” is a group of dialects often used in the northern part of the country (low in altitude), whereas “High German” dialects are from the geographically central/southern and more mountainous parts of the country.
  • The longest German word that has been published is "Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft.“ It conveys a lot of information in those 79 letters; the English translation takes 111 characters (counting letters and spaces): „Association for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services.” This word is not used in everyday speech! According to the 1995 Guinness Book of World Records, the longest German word in everyday usage is Rechtsschutzversicherungsgesellschaften at 39 letters. English needs 36 characters to say the same thing: ("legal protection insurance companies").
  • Thirteen German speaking people have won the Nobel Prize in literature: Theodor Mommsen, Rudolf Christoph Eucken, Paul von Heyse, Gerhart Hauptmann, Carl Spitteler, Thomas Mann, Nelly Sachs, Hermann Hesse, Heinrich Böll, Elias Canetti, Günter Grass, Elfriede Jelinek and Herta Müller.
  • Germany has had 29 Nobel laureates in chemistry, more than any other country except the USA. There have also been 25 German Nobel laureates in physics, again, more than any other country except the USA.

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AUDIO ASSETS:

  • Germany Was wollen wir trinken (by Bots/Dieter Dehm) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2SawQZIbjg
    A beloved song about doing things together—working, drinking, and protesting injustice. This song comes from the 1970s and was sung by a Dutch band in German.
  • Haus am See (by Peter Fox) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMqIuAJ92tM
    This songwriter has several hits; this one is from 2008 and tells a story about leaving and then returning home to an idyllic house by a lake surrounded by orange trees.
  • Nur ein Wort (by Wir sind Helden) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bqywY8Wgvk8
    A modern classic, the singer pleads with a non-communicative partner to „Please, just give me one word!“ The band Wir sind Helden broke up in 2012 but their music remains popular in many countries—the band has arranged versions of its songs in French and Japanese.
  • Die perfekte Welle (by Juli) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4janyg4Dsvc
    The day when the perfect wave finally comes—that’s what this song is about! It was released in 2004 and is representative of a tendency in Germany at that time to write music with German lyrics (many English and French songs are popular in German-speaking countries).
  • Schau schau (by Selig) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDjc5eiFZOE
    „And I look, look, look into tomorrow, woven together out of so many worlds…” begins the refrain of this song. The band Selig is originally from Hamburg.

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SAMPLE ACTIVITIES:

  • How to get along in a German restaurant

  • Das Alphabet
    • German letter “A” is always pronounced like English “A” as in father
    • German letter “Ä” is always pronounced like English “A” as in take
    • German letter “B” is pronounced softer, more like English “P” as in paper
    • GermanyGerman letter “E” is usually pronounced like English “A” as in take, but if it´s at the end of a word it is said like English “UH” as in lumber
    • German letter “G” is always pronounced like English “G” as in game, never soft like in giant.
    • German letter “I” is usually pronounced like English “EE” as in seem
    • German letter “J” is always pronounced like English “Y” as in yawn
    • German letter “Ö” is always pronounced like English “O” as in worse (but NO “r” sound afterwards)
    • German letter “R” has no English equivalent, but try rolling your uvula (the hanging flesh in the back of your mouth); it is like gargling without water.
    • German letter “ß” is always pronounced like our English “SS”
    • German letter “U” is always pronounced like a short version of our English “OO”
    • German letter “Ü” has no English equivalent, but try saying “oo” with your lips with and “ee” in the back of your mouth.
    • German letter “V” is always pronounced like our English “F”
    • German letter “W” is always pronounced like our English “V”
    • German letter “Z” is always pronounced like English “TS” as in pots
    • German letters “ST” are always pronounced like English “SCHT”
    • German letters “AU” are always pronounced like English “OW” as in bow
    • German letters “EU” or “ÄU” are always pronounced like English “OY” as in boy
    • German letters “IE” or “I” are always pronounced like English “EE” as in meet
    • German letters “EI” are always pronounced like English “I” as in time

    • There are no silent letters. (Unless the word is borrowed from English or French!)
    • Letters that sound more or less like their English equivalents:
      C, D, F, H, K, L, M, N, O, P, S, T, X

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