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2007
CASPER COLLEGE NEWS ARCHIVE


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Monday, January 29, 2007
TICKETS FOR ARTURO SANDOVAL STILL AVAILABLE
IAJE Allstate Jazz Band to open for Latin jazz great

Nearly half of the tickets for the Arturo Sandoval concert have been sold, according to Deanna Dyer, fine arts academic assistant. The concert is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 6 at 7:30 p.m.

Sandoval and his six-member band are the headline act for the 40th Annual Kinser Jazz Festival February 6 and 7. “We are incredibly excited to be bringing a musician of Arturo Sandoval’s talent to the state of Wyoming,” says Robert Kleinschmidt, jazz festival co-director. “This year’s jazz festival will have a real Latin flavor to it.

In addition to Sandoval, the concert will open with the 2007 Wyoming International Association of Jazz Educators (IAJE) Allstate Jazz Band. “These are a very talented group of young musicians selected by audition from the state’s 7th through 12th grade musicians. Each student had to send in a tape of himself or herself playing pre-selected pieces that they had to learn,” says Kleinschmidt.

The students will have a brief time to rehearse with this year’s IAJE Allstate Jazz Band director, Victor Lopez. Lopez is a highly acclaimed composer, arranger, and adjudicator from Miami. In addition to his many talents, Lopez was the lead trumpet player from 1981 to 1987 for Miami Sound Machine, one of the most successful Latin crossover bands of the 80’s. Eventually the group became known as Gloria Estefan and Miami Sound Machine.

Students selected for this year’s IAJE Allstate Jazz Band include: Scott Kitchen (Powell) and Rex Amend (Riverton) on alto saxophone; Erik Olson (Powell) and Michael Hanich (Cody) on tenor saxophone; Dieter Noesner (Cody) on baritone saxophone; Andy Mrozinsky and Aaron Peterman (both of Cody), Brian Bull (Douglas) and Ian Henry (Sheridan) all on trumpet; Spencer Nelson (Cody), Trevor Terry (Buffalo), Joshua March (Green River) and Donavan Nussbaum (Rock Springs) all on trombone; Kirk Stonecipher (Riverton) on drums; Dasom Kim (Laramie) on piano; Travis Smith (Riverton) on bass; Garry Wood (Saratoga) on guitar; and Max Rea, Matt Doctor and Ryan Wykert (all from Casper) on Latin percussion.

The 7:30 p.m. concert will be held in the John F. Welsh Auditorium at Natrona County High School. Tickets are $15 each and can be purchased by calling 268-2021, toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2021 or online at www.caspercollege.edu. Visa, MasterCard and Discover are accepted.

 

Monday, January 29, 2007
IMMIGRATION LAW BASICS TO BE DISCUSSED AT CASPER COLLEGE

An in-service session entitled “Immigration Law Basics” will be offered at Casper College on Wednesday, Feb. 7 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Casper immigration attorney Jon Huss will teach the free in-service session. Huss will discuss types of visas, the application process for family and employment based visas, the adjustment of status process for green cards, and enforcement and deportation issues.

According to Lisa Mixer, ABE/GED co-director and tutor coordinator, a question and answer session will follow Huss’s presentation.

The free in-service session is open to the public and will be held in the Werner Technical Center, Room 115 on the Casper College campus.

The Casper College ABE/GED Center and Literacy Volunteers of Casper will host “Immigration Law Basics.”

For more information, contact Mixer at 268-2453 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Wednesday, January 24, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE TO HOST TRADES AND TECHNOLOGY CAREER FAIR

The Casper College McMurry Career Studies Center will be the site for a trades and technology career fair on Thursday, Feb. 8 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

According to Wesley Bertagnole, Casper College Career Center technician, the event is open to everyone. “These industrial companies are not only interested in hiring people from the trades and technology areas, but are also hiring in a wide variety of areas including sales, communications, business and professional, computer programming, accounting, and environmental, as well as many other areas,” says Bertagnole.

“This is a great chance to make a personal contact with businesses throughout the state of Wyoming,” he says.

Businesses currently registered to appear at the fair include:

  •  Automation Electronics, Casper, WY
  •  Bureau of Land Management Fire Management, Casper, WY
  •  Carpenters Local Union, Casper, WY
  • Casper Fire EMS, Casper, WY
  • Communication Systems Inc., Casper, WY
  • Compression Leasing Services Inc., Casper, WY
  • Hanover, Mills, WY
  • High Country Fabrication Inc., Casper, WY
  • J.W. Williams Inc., Casper, WY
  • Key Energy Services, Casper, WY
  • L & H Industrial, Gillette, WY
  • McMurry Training Center, Casper, WY
  • Patterson UTI Drilling, Casper, WY
  • Reiman Corp., Cheyenne, WY
  • Rocky Mountain Fire Systems Inc., Casper, WY
  • Schlumberger, Greenwood Village, CO
  • Sheet Metal Workers Local 103, Casper, WY
  • Teton Homes, Casper, WY
  • TIC The Industrial Company, Casper, WY
  • Union Pacific Railroad, San Antonio, TX
  • U.S. Government-Transportation Security Administration, Casper, WY
  • WOTCO, Mills, WY
  • Wyoming Electrical JATC, Casper, WY
  • Wyoming Machinery Co., Casper, WY

TopFor more information contact Bertagnole at 268-2392 toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2392 or log onto http://www.caspercollege.edu/students/cost/jobs/tradescareerfair.html.

 

Friday, January 26, 2007
PUBLIC INVITED TO ATTEND BIG BAND JAM SESSION

The public is invited to attend a big band jam session featuring faculty, students and adjudicators who participated in Casper College’s 40th Annual Kinser Jazz Festival on Wednesday night, Feb. 7 at 7:30 in the Mardi Gras Room of the Parkway Plaza.

According to Robert Kleinschmidt, jazz festival co-director, the session is a chance for students to play with faculty and several of the adjudicators who participated in the jazz festival and are also professional musicians in their own right.

“We tried this last year, and everyone had a great time. We hope to make this a regular feature of each Kinser Jazz Festival,” Kleinschmidt says.

More than 60 groups are scheduled to perform in 30-minute increments during the two-day jazz festival on the Casper College campus. Student musicians in grades 7 through 12 come from all over the state to perform before their peers and professional adjudicators.

The public is also invited to attend the jazz festival. Performances start every half hour throughout the day. Jazz vocal groups perform in the Roberts Commons Ballroom while jazz instrumental groups perform in Durham Hall in the Aley Fine Arts Center.

Both the jazz festival and the big band jam session are free and open to all. For more information, log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Thursday, January 25, 2007
FOR LOVE OR COUNTRY” TO BE SCREENED AT CASPER COLLEGE

A film biography of Latin jazz great Arturo Sandoval will be shown at Casper College on Friday, Feb. 2 beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Durham Hall.

For Love or Country: The Arturo Sandoval Story” starring Andy Garcia as Sandoval was nominated for two Golden Globes: best performance by an actor in a mini-series or motion picture made for TV (Garcia) and best mini-series or motion picture made for TV.

According to jazz festival co-director Robert Kleinschmidt, the film is being shown in conjunction with the 40th Annual Kinser Jazz Festival. The jazz festival will be held Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 6 and 7, and Sandoval will perform in concert on the night of Feb. 6 beginning at 7:30 in the John F. Welsh Auditorium at Natrona County High School.

“We thought showing this film on Mr. Sandoval’s life would be a great way to acquaint the community with him and his work,” says Kleinschmidt.

Amazon reviewer Mindy Ruehmann noted that “This HBO film shows how Sandoval's life in revolutionary Cuba is affected – beginning in the early 1970s – by his zeal for his music and by the limits placed on him by his homeland. Representing his torn loyalties are Dizzy Gillespie (Charles S. Dutton) and Sandoval's wife, Marianela (Mia Maestro). Arturo (must) play government-imposed music instead of the jazz that he loves. Sandoval travels the world, and while the Cuban government profits from his success, he is exposed to a freedom that eventually draws him to the difficult and life-changing decision he and his family feel compelled to make.”

Following the showing of the film, Casper College instructors Erich Frankland, Terry Gunderson and Patrick Amelotte will briefly discuss the film.

For Love or Country: The Arturo Sandoval Story” is free and open to the public. The film is rated PG-13 rating for brief strong language. Durham Hall is located in the Aley Fine Arts Center on the Casper College campus.

 

Thursday, January 25, 2007
AUDITIONS TO BE HELD DURING FESTIVAL

Auditions for senior high school music students will be held during the Casper College Kinser 40th Annual Jazz Festival February 6 and 7 at Casper College.

“We have never done this before, but thought that this would be a great venue to stage auditions for those music students who plan to attend college to study music,” says Robert Kleinschmidt, jazz festival co-director and instructor of woodwinds at Casper College.

“Several state and regional colleges have been invited to participate and audition students in instrumental, vocal and musical theatre genres,” Kleinschmidt notes.

The auditions will take place in the Black Box Theatre located in the Gertrude Krampert Theatre Complex on the Casper College campus from 1 to 4 p.m. each day.

To schedule an audition, call Deanna Dyer at 268-2606, toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2606 or by email at ddyer@caspercollege.edu.

 

Tuesday, January 23, 2007
T-BIRDS HOPE TO FIND MISSING INGREDIENTS AT HOME

Gary Becker knows this week will tell a lot about his Casper College basketball team.

Becker’s Thunderbirds have fallen on hard times of late, victims of themselves but also of a difficult schedule. Casper (9-9) has played only one home game since Thanksgiving and that was against the No. 8 team in the country (they lost to Northeastern Colorado, 78-71).

The T-Birds, who have come back to earth after an eight-game winning streak in December, are finally home again Wednesday night. Eastern Wyoming College comes to town for a 7 p.m. contest. It is a game Becker knows is important. It is a sub-region contest, which will determine seeding at the Region IX tournament.

While the T-Birds have lost six of their last seven, two of those were buzzer beaters on the road at Mid Plains and Laramie County. Like many other Region IX teams, the T-Birds are finding it tough on the road. Injuries and absences have played a role, too.

Becker says his team would like to find the chemistry and intensity it had before the holiday break. Josh Davis, the Birds’ leading scorer and rebounder, has sat out four of the five games in January for disciplinary reasons. Becker says he will be back in the lineup for Eastern Wyoming. Davis is averaging 15.5 points and 7.2 rebounds per game.
Becker says Eastern Wyoming is a mirror image of his Casper team. Like the T-Birds, the Lancers (11-9) have lost games to Sheridan, LCCC and Northwest. They lost a tough game to Western Wyoming at Rock Springs on Saturday, their fourth loss in a row. “They are a lot like us; up and down on the roller coaster,” Becker says. “We beat them in December, but they are a solid team.”

The T-Birds prevailed in that first meeting, 75-55 in the pre-conference tournament, but Becker says he expects a tougher game Wednesday.

The Lancers are the second best outside shooting team in the region, averaging 47 percent from beyond the 3-point arc. The T-Birds, meanwhile, are also led by their guard line. Andy Pokorny (9.5 points, 4 rebounds per game) is having a solid sophomore season, as is Scott Nelson. Freshmen DeMarcus Richard and David McKinnie have also played well at times. Nelson and Richard are averaging in double figures with Davis. McKinnie is dishing out 4 assists per game, good for ninth in the region.

TopThe T-Birds will be back in action Saturday night at Erickson Gymnasium. Western Nebraska comes to town for a homecoming double header. Games are at 6 and 8.

 

Saturday, January 20, 2007
FOUNDATION REACHES INFINITE POSSIBILITIES GOAL

The Casper College Foundation has met its $9 million Infinite Possibilities campaign goal. That announcement came Saturday morning during the annual Casper College Retiree Brunch.

“We are delighted to announce that we have reached our goal and have raised $9 million in new permanent funds in our Infinite Possibilities campaign,” says Paul Hallock, executive director of the Casper College Foundation. “More than $4.5 million has been raised from friends, alumni, community members and others,” notes Hallock. The other $4.5 million comes from the state of Wyoming’s Community College Endowment Challenge Program.

“During the last several weeks we have received a number of generous donations which have allowed us to achieve our Infinite Possibilities goal,” Hallock says. We are also very appreciative to the Wyoming legislature for their challenge to all the community colleges and hope that each of us will succeed in achieving the goal,” he adds.

“We have been able to raise this money in about half of this five-year window specified by the state of Wyoming,” says George Bryce, campaign chairman. “We couldn’t do that without the help of this wonderful community.” It never ceases to amaze me how much the community of Casper loves Casper College.”

“Once again Casper has stepped forward to provide resources for the benefit of our many students, and we are extremely grateful,” says John Jorgensen, Casper College Foundation president.

“We are so pleased that so many friends of Casper College have responded positively to this wonderful opportunity provided by the 57th Wyoming State Legislature. The dollar for dollar match has been extremely popular and will provide many more students the opportunity to attend classes,” says Walter Nolte, president of Casper College.

The Infinite Possibilities campaign began in the summer of 2004 in response to the Wyoming Community College Endowment Challenge Program created in March 2004 by the 57th Legislature of the State of Wyoming. The new law appropriated more than $31 million to be divided equally among the state's seven community colleges.

“In other words, the monies raised have been placed in an endowment and will be managed by the foundation. The interest and dividends will be used to fund scholarships and other needs as specified by the donors or the college,” says Hallock.

According to Hallock, 60% of the monies raised have been designated for scholarships. “I think the general public believes that the greatest need is to provide scholarship to students as the costs of higher education continue to rise,” he says.

 

Wednesday, January 17, 2007
CC HOSTS T-BIRD BUDDY PROGRAM

T-Bird BuddiesYoung basketball enthusiasts grades 1-6 are encouraged to sign up for the T-Bird Buddy Program and clinic at Casper College.

The program, designed as a mini clinic, begins January 27 and runs for four Saturdays through Feb. 17. Cost is $40 for the four days. Participants will receive a camp shirt, free game pass and other prizes.
Gary Becker, men’s basketball coach at Casper College, says T-Bird Buddies will receive instruction on fundamentals from the T-Birds and the coaching staff.

Grades 1-3 will run 9 to 10 a.m. each of the Saturdays at T-Bird Gymnasium. Grades 4-6 will run 10 to 11 a.m. Kids should come dressed for lots of activity and fun.

Anyone interested is encouraged to download and print the registration form or call Judy Griffin at 268-3000 for more information.

 

Tuesday, January 16, 2007
SPECIAL COFFEE HOUR CELEBRATES VALENTINE’S DAY

The Casper College International Students Organization will host a special international coffee hour on Valentine’s Day, Wednesday, Feb. 14 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the Doornbos Student Lounge.

“The international students always enjoy these coffee hours because they give them a chance to meet and visit with community members,” says Margo Perry, world languages instructor and international education coordinator.
As part of the festivities international students will also be on hand to write Valentine messages in their native language. “We have done this in the past and the students and those attending the coffee hour have had great fun with the international Valentines,” Perry says.

According to Perry $1 will be charged per Valentine and all the money collected will go into the International Student Organization account to help pay for activities and trips.

Students from 18 different countries, including Bulgaria, Serbia, Hong Kong, Kenya, Finland, Germany, Bolivia and Zambia, currently attend Casper College.

In addition to coffee, punch and Valentine Day treats will also be provided. The Doornbos Student Lounge is located in the Casper College Administration Building. The coffee hour is free and open to the public.

 

Tuesday, January 16, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE SITE OF COLLEGE GOAL SUNDAY

Casper College will be one of 13 sites statewide to host College Goal Sunday on Sunday, Feb. 11 from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Doornbos Student Lounge in the Casper College Administration Building.

The free event is designed to provide students and their parents with help in completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

“Students and their parents need to bring their completed 2006 Internal Revenue Service 1040 tax returns or their W-2 forms and other 2006 income, asset and benefits information,” says Darry Voigt, Casper College director of financial aid and site coordinator for College Goal Sunday at Casper College.

While at the event students will receive assistance from experts and volunteers in completing the FAFSA form.

“We are encouraging students to obtain a personal identification number by going to www.fafsa.ed.gov at least two weeks prior to the event.

Students who attend College Goal Sunday will be eligible to participate in drawings to win education-related prizes including scholarships ranging in value from $200 to $500.

College Goal Sunday was begun in 2002. Since that time nearly 1,500 students and their families have received help completing financial-aid forms.

Sponsors for the event include the Lumina Foundation for Education, USA Funds, Central Wyoming College TRIO and GEAR UP programs, Sodexo, Western States Learning Corporation, Casper College, Central Wyoming College, Eastern Wyoming College, Laramie County Community College, Northwest College, Sheridan College, Western Wyoming Community College and the University of Wyoming.

TopFor more information contact Voigt at 268-2596, toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2596 or by email at dvoigt@caspercollege.edu.

 

Tuesday, January 16, 2007
LARGEST HEALTH PROFESSIONS CAREER FAIR AT CASPER COLLEGE

More than thirty businesses involved in the health profession will be participating in Casper College’s Health Professions Career Fair on Friday, Feb. 2 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Roberts Commons Ballroom on the Casper College campus.

“This is the largest health professions career fair in the state,” says Janet de Vries, director of the Casper College Career Center. Health profession employers from Arizona, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, South Dakota and Wyoming will be at the event.

“All of the health professions continue to be in high demand. The quality of our graduates is outstanding, which is why most of the recruiters return to our career fair year after year,” says de Vries.

“Casper College's May graduates are entering a strong job market. It's an enviable position to be in,” de Vries says. “Hospitals hire more than just students and graduates in the direct patient care majors (nursing, medical radiography, etc. Business, communication, marketing, accounting, social work, engineering, and foreign language are all needed at health care facilities,” she adds.

“Working professionals, job seekers, and people exploring career options in the health care field are welcome to attend,” says de Vries. All job seekers are encouraged to bring resumes and dress professionally for the fair, which is free and open to the public.
    
Those businesses attending the fair include:

• Attentive Healthcare, Sheridan, Wyo.
• Banner Health, Greeley, Colo.
• BioLife Plasma Services, Casper
• Campbell County Memorial Hospital, Gillette, Wyo.
• Casper-Natrona County Health Department, Casper
• Central Wyoming Hospice and Transitions Program, Casper
• Community Health Center of Central Wyoming, Casper
• Emissary Pharmacy and Infusion Services, Casper
• Glendive Medical Center, Glendive, Mont.
• Hot Springs County Memorial Hospital, Thermopolis, Wyo.
• Interim HealthCare, Casper
• Intermountain Healthcare, Provo, Utah
• Ivinson Memorial Hospital, Laramie, Wyo.
• Lander Valley Medical Center, Lander, Wyo.
• Life Care Center of Casper, Casper
• Meadow Wind Assisted Living Community, Casper
• Memorial Health Center, Sidney, Neb.
• Memorial Hospital of Converse County, Douglas, Wyo.
• North Platte Home Health, Casper
• Prison Health Services, Rawlins, Wyo.
• Rapid City Region Hospital, Rapid City, S.D.
• Regional West Medical Center, Scottsbluff, Neb.
• Riverton Memorial Hospital, Riverton, Wyo.
• Sage View Care Center, Rock Springs, Wyo.
• Salem Hospital, Salem, Ore.
• U.S. Army Medical Recruiting, Aurora, Colo.
• University of Wyoming School of Nursing, Laramie, Wyo.
• Veterans Medical Center, Cheyenne and Sheridan, Wyo.
• Washoe Health System (Renown Health), Reno, Nev.
• Wyoming Health Resources Network, Cheyenne, Wyo.
• Wyoming Medical Center, Casper
• Wyoming Office of Healthcare Licensing and Surveys, Cheyenne, Wyo.
• Yuma Regional Medical Center, Yuma, Ariz.

For more information call de Vries at 268-2446 or toll free at 800-442-2963 ext. 2446 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Tuesday, January 16, 2007
FREE GED TEST OFFERED TO FIRST 50

Fifty free GED tests will be offered during the month of February by the Casper College Adult Basic Education (ABE)/GED Center.

“We will be offering the free GED test to the first 50 participants who register and pass the Test of Adult Basic Education,” says Lisa Mixer, Casper College ABE/GED center co-director and tutor coordinator.
Following the successful completion of the ABE test, a voucher will then be given to the student to take to the Casper College Testing Center so that they may take the GED test during the month of February, according to Mixer.

Those interested in taking the ABE test should go to the ABE/GED Center in the Werner Technical Center, Room 115 or to the Casper Workforce Center at 851 Werner Court, Suite 121. “Students attending the Casper College site must attend a New Student Orientation held each Tuesday at 8 a.m., 1 or 6 p.m.,” Mixer says.

For more information, contact the ABE/GED Center at 268-2230.

 

Friday, January 12, 2007
MEET AND GREET WITH CASPER COLLEGE’S NEW CERTIFIED MICROSOFT INSTRUCTOR SET

The Casper College Business Division has hired a certified Microsoft instructor to teach the division’s many Microsoft networking and certificate classes, according to Liz Ott, business division chair.
“We are excited to have someone of Rick Lamotte’s training, skill and background in the business division. He will provide our students and the business community with a level of training that they need and demand,” says Ott.

The meet and greet will give potential students and those interested in taking Microsoft networking and certificate classes this spring a chance to visit with Lamotte regarding course offerings and times.

Lamotte will be teaching three courses for the spring 2007 semester: MSFT 1520 “Windows Server,” MSFT 1561 “Active Directory,” and MSFT 1568 “Windows XP Professional.”

The first two classes do not yet have a set meeting time, while MSFT 1568 is scheduled to run on Mondays and Wednesdays from 3 to 4:40 p.m. “We want those interested in these classes to come by on Thursday night to visit with Rick about what time they would like to have MSFT 1520 and MSFT 1561 held. We want to make these classes as convenient as possible for everyone, so Rick is even open to the idea of teaching class on Saturdays,” says Ott.

Lamotte is certified as a MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer Windows 2003), MCSA (Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator Windows 2003), and MCP (Microsoft Certified Professional, CompTia Security+).

His past job positions include technical director for CCTV-Chittenden County Television Station in Burlington, Vt.; workstation administrator and support for the VLSI test engineering department for IBM; systems network administrator for Schafer and Associates; lead custom applications programmer and development manager for Achievement Computers, and most recently as PC technician, webmaster and Windows systems engineer for St. Labre Indian School.

The meet and greet will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 18 in the Thorsen Institute of Business, Room 307 on the Casper College campus. The meet and greet is free and open to the public. Refreshments including coffee, punch and cookies will be served.

For more information or for those unable to attend the meet and greet but who would like to give their input about the start times of the classes may contact Lamotte at Toprlamotte@caspercollege.edu or 268-2413 or Glenda Pullen, business division academic assistant at gpullen@caspercollege.edu or 268-2389.

 

Wednesday, January 10, 2007
HOMECOMING FEATURES T-BIRD RIVALS AND FREE CHILI

The Casper College Alumni Association is again hosting Homecoming at the Swede Erickson Thunderbird Gym on Saturday, Jan. 27.

Perennial rival Western Nebraska will take the courts against both the T-Bird men’s and women’s teams. Games begin at 6 p.m. for the women and 8 p.m. for the men, and admission is only $1 per person. Children 6 and under will be admitted for free.

The festivities include free chili to the first 500 fans through the door. According to Derrel Carruth, alumni board president, the free chili has become very popular with T-Bird fans. “The chili goes fast. We often do not have any left over.”
In addition to the free chili, the alumni association has teamed up with the Make A Wish Foundation to provide two young T-Bird fans the opportunity to become “T-Bird Captains for a Day.” Both youngsters will be announced over the loudspeaker, receive an official T-Bird uniform, and meet the players.

The Western Nebraska Cougars and the Casper College T-Birds are the oldest rivalry in Region IX, dating back to 1945. Both games will be broadcast live on KVOC (1230 AM) radio.

 

Tuesday, January 9, 2007
COLLEGE ANNOUNCES JANUARY MEETING TIMES

The Casper College District Board of Trustees will hold their January board meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 16 beginning at 7 p.m. in the Strausner Student Center, Room 217.

Prior to the board meeting the trustees will hold its work session and finance meeting from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Strausner Student Center, Room 207.

All meeting minutes and schedules for the board are available on the Casper College Web site at www.caspercollege.edu/community.

Both meetings are open and the public is invited to attend.

 

Monday, January 8, 2007
ANNUAL WORLD’S FAIR FOCUSES ON CUBAN THEME

The food and culture of Cuba will be the focus of the next Casper College ethnic dinner and annual World’s Fair on Thursday, Feb. 1 from 5 to 6:45 p.m. in the Roberts Commons Cafeteria.

The Cuban theme is in support of the 40th Annual Kinser Jazz Festival guest artist Arturo Sandoval, who will appear in concert the following Tuesday, Feb. 6, according to Robert Kleinschmidt, jazz festival co-director.

The Cuban dinner menu will feature avocado & pineapple salad, tropical fruit salad (canned pineapple, guava, mangos, fresh bananas), tossed green salad, puerco asado (roast pork), arroz con pollo (chicken & yellow rice), camarones al ajillo (garlic shrimp), frijoles negros (black beans & white rice), and frituras de maiz tierno (corn fritters). For dessert Coconut Flan, torticoas de morón (Cuban cookies), and plantánitos horneados (banana crisp) will be served.

“We had some really nice exhibits from 20 countries and cultures at last year’s World’s Fair," said Janet de Vries of the college's diversity committee. "We hope to have as many or more this year." The fair portion of the evening will be located in the Roberts Commons Ballroom from 5 to 7 p.m. and is free and open to the public.
Tickets for the Cuban dinner are $8 in advance and only available through Friday, Jan. 26. Advance tickets can be purchased at the Roberts Commons Cafeteria Monday through Thursday from 7 to 9 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4:45 to 6:45 p.m.; at the coffee bars located in the Administration Building and the Wold Physical Science Center between the hours of 8 a.m. and 1 p.m., and in the Casper College Office of Accounting and Financial Management from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Tickets will also be available at the door the night of the dinner at a cost of $9.50 for adults. All ticket sales are cash only.

The Casper College Diversity Committee sponsors the World’s Fair and Cuban ethnic diversity dinner. Other ethnic diversity dinners scheduled include Italy on March 1 and Poland on April 12.

 

Monday, January 8, 2007
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY OFFERED IN NIGHT CLASS

If you are like most people with a digital camera you have some great photos on your computer that you would like to turn into prints, but just don’t know how. It may be easier than you think, with the help of a digital photography class being offered for the spring semester at Casper College.

“Electronic Digital Photo” (ELTR 2145) will include the basic techniques of digital photography and an overview of what is needed to acquire, store, retouch, and print digital and hybrid photographs.

Miles Hecker, digital photography professional, will teach the class on Thursday nights from 6 to 9. Hecker will start with the basics of digital photography and also cover the use of scanners and printers. Students will learn the basics of Adobe’s Photoshop software program to both restore prints, negatives and slides, and to create prints from digital camera images.

For more information or to register, call Casper College at 268-2100. “Electronic Digital Photo” begins on Jan. 18.

 

Monday, January 8, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE OFFERS GRANT WRITING CLASS

Casper College will offer a grant writing class, starting on Saturday, Jan. 20, and continuing on two more Saturdays, Feb. 3 and 24.
According to Shirley Jacob, adjunct instructor of English at Casper College, the class is designed for staff and volunteers of nonprofit organizations who want to write successful grant proposals to local, state, and national foundations. The class is also appropriate for in-service and pre-service teachers and social workers. Students must have a connection to a nonprofit organization that would be eligible for a grant from a foundation.

“‘Beginning Grant Writing’ (ENGL 1500) is not a theory class but a real life application of grant writing principles,” says Jacob. “For this initial class, I focus on foundations because, in general, foundation grants are easier to get and the applications are less complicated than for government grants. Nothing increases a beginning grant writer’s confidence more than winning the first grant he or she submits.”

“Beginning Grant Writing” is a hybrid course where Jacob will meet with students in a traditional classroom setting for three Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The students will then submit their assignments and communicate with Jacob via WebCT, an Internet-based instructional tool. “This is a time-intensive course and worth three credit hours,” says Jacob, “but the thrill of writing a successful proposal is worth the hard work.”

Students wishing to sign up for “Beginning Grant Writing” can do so through January 19, according to Jacob. The class, which meets in the Thorsen Institute of Business, Rm. 122 on the Casper College campus, has a limit of 12 students.

TopFor more information or to register call 268-2100, 800-442-2963 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Monday, January 8, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE PREPARES NEW DEGREE PROGRAM THANKS TO $1 MILLION GRANT

With the announcement in late December 2006 that the U.S. Department of Labor had awarded Casper College a grant worth over $1 million for a three-year program the college is now in the process of moving the program forward.

“Casper College and its partners are establishing a degree program to train power plant operators for a regional market,” says Bill Edwards, director of the Casper College Center for Training and Development. “This market includes power plants operated by our partner, Rocky Mountain Power, in six states (Wyoming, Utah, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and California),” adds Edwards.

Plans for the new program call for the hiring of a project director and faculty, facility modifications at Casper College for program specific instruction, equipment purchases and final curriculum development. The new degree program will be offered to students beginning with the fall 2007 semester.

“Although an increasing number of people are discovering the opportunities and high wages available in the power generation industry, an adequate number of skilled workers are not readily available to fill the need,” says Rod Hensley, Rocky Mountain Power human resources consultant. Hensley projects that within the next 10 years “a large number of operation and maintenance personnel from the current operator positions may retire.”

Other partners in the program include Casper Workforce Center (Wyoming Workforce Development Office), and the Natrona County School System, according to Laura Driscoll, dean of continuing education and community partnerships.

“All four partners are actively engaged in the process to address the workforce issues in our region,” says Driscoll. To that end, the energy industry, specifically the power generating industry, “was identified as an industry that is and would be in need of highly trained and skilled employees,” she notes.

Casper College was one of 72 community colleges nationwide to be awarded a grant from the President’s Community-Based Job Training Grants program out of a total of 429 entries. Administered by the Department of Labor, the grant program was established by President Bush in 2004 to “build community college’s capacity to equip workers with the skills growing local industries require for success.”

 

Wednesday, January 3, 2007
T-BIRDS HONOR MARTIN LUTHER KING WITH FREE CLINIC

The men’s and women’s basketball teams at Casper College are issuing a special invitation to young basketball fans in the community.

The T-Birds are offering a “Pop and Picture Day” basketball clinic for kids in grades kindergarten through eighth grade as part of the community’s Martin Luther King celebration day. The clinic is free of charge and runs 2 to 4 p.m. Jan. 15 (Monday) at Casper College’s Erickson Thunderbird Gymnasium.

Youngsters will have the opportunity to meet the T-Birds up close. All participants will be given a free pass to an upcoming T-Bird game, along with a free Pepsi and other gifts.

For more information about the MLK celebration day, or about the T-Bird clinic, call 268-2446.

 

Wednesday, January 3, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE HOSTS FREE EVENTS TO CELEBRATE MLK DAY

MLKCasper College will be celebrating Martin Luther King Day on Monday, Jan. 15 with a free basketball clinic, and will serve as the site for a lunch, service project and multi-cultural competence workshop in collaboration with community sponsors.

Following a march starting at City Park at 10 a.m., lunch will be served in the Casper College Roberts Commons Cafeteria. According to Janet de Vries, Casper College Diversity Committee member, the lunch is free to all MLK March and afternoon program participants. The cost for all others is $6. Natrona County School District Diversity Task Force and the We Speak Coalition are sponsoring the lunch.

Beginning at 1 p.m. participants will be able to build a starter emergency preparedness kit as a service project. The event will be held in the Casper College Roberts Commons Ballroom, adjacent to the cafeteria. “People can help serve their community by building starter emergency preparedness kits for those who need them,” said de Vries.

From 2 to 4 p.m. a free basketball clinic for youth in grades K - 8 will be held at the Erickson Thunderbird Gym on the college campus. Pop and Picture Day with the T-Birds will take place at the same time. Participants should carry in gym shoes to wear on the gym floor.

The multi-cultural competence workshop will also begin at 2 and run until 5 p.m. The workshop is free to adults and students in grades 6 - 12. It will be held in the Casper College Roberts Commons Ballroom.

For more information, contact de Vries at 268-2446.

 

Wednesday, January 3, 2007
FIBER OPTICS WORKSHOP OFFERED FOR SPRING

A fiber optics workshop will be offered on Saturdays during the spring 2007 semester at Casper College.

“Electronics Workshop IV” (ELTR 2945), will “train electricians, network technicians, and electronic technicians on the installation and termination of optical fiber and cable,” said Dave Arndt, Casper College electronics instructor.
According to Arndt, those who successfully complete the two-credit workshop can take the test to become a Certified Fiber Optic Installer. “The certification is through the Electronic Technicians Association International. This certification is recognized in the United States and throughout the world,” Arndt said.

For more information on the class, contact Arndt at 268-2521, toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2521 or darndt@caspercollege.edu. To register for the class, call Casper College at 268-2100 or toll free at 800-442-2963.

Top“Electronics Workshop IV” (ELTR 2945) will begin on Saturday, March 24 and will run through Saturday, April 28.

 

Wednesday, January 3, 2007
"YEE-HAW" LIVESTOCK JUDGING TEAM SCORES BIG WIN

The Casper College Livestock Judging Team under the direction of Heath Hornecker scored a big win at the recently held North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville, Ky.

"We had a great day at one of the most prestigious contests in the country," says Hornecker. The team took first overall at the contest. "Yee-haw is all I can say!" Hornecker exclaims. The team competed against 23 teams and 111 students at the contest.

To achieve the honor of first overall, the team took 11th in sheep, second in swine and reasons and first in beef. "The team was just one point away from setting the team beef record," notes Hornecker.

Individually, the Casper College team had three judgers in the top four. "That doesn’t happen very often," says Hornecker. "The students work hard, have a great attitude and are open minded and willing to learn. I’m proud," Hornecker adds.

Randall Von Krosigk took 14th in sheep, 13th in swine, fifth in beef, first in reasons (where he tied the all-time record) and first overall. Von Krosigk, a 2005 graduate of Shoshoni High School, is a sophomore agri-business major at Casper College and the son of Wendell and Sandy Von Krosigk of Riverton, Wyo.

Sophomore Kayla Auen placed 17th in reasons, eighth in beef, seventh in swine and second overall. "She continues her dominating performances," says Hornecker. A 2005 graduate of Natrona County High School the general agriculture major is the daughter of Jeff and Rainey Auen of Casper.

Nicole Thomas of Pavillion, Wyo. took 10th in swine, fourth in beef and overall, and second in reasons. A sophomore agri-business major, she is the daughter of Kerry and Frank Deede also of Pavillion and a 2005 graduate of Wind River High School.

In addition, both Tyler Kralicek and Megan Mavencamp had overall placings: Kralicek at 27th and Mavencamp at 39th. Kralicek is a 2005 graduate of Killdeer Public School and a sophomore agriculture education major at Casper College. He is the son of Curt and Brenda Kralicek of Manning, N.D. Mavencamp is a 2005 graduate of Hagerman High School and a sophomore animal science major. She is the daughter of John and Stacy Mavencamp of Hagerman, Idaho.

Judging Team

The Casper College Livestock Judging Team proudly shows off the many placques and trophies they won recently at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville, Ky. Pictured l-r, back row: Heath Hornecker, Tyler Gray, Megan Mavencamp, and Tyler Kralicek. Front row: Kayla Auen, Randell Von Krosigk, Nicole Thomas, and Taylor Ostergaard.
(Casper College photo by Matt ‘Moose’ Young.)

 

Wednesday, January 3, 2007
GIS AND GPS OFFERED AT CASPER COLLEGE FOR SPRING

Two classes dealing with geographic information science (GIS) and one dealing with global positioning systems (GPS) will be offered at Casper College for the spring 2007 semester.

"GIS is a new high tech mapping field that is being used by almost every discipline now," said Jeff Sun, GIS instructor at the college.

Students, especially in the fields of agriculture, biology, business, environmental science, engineering, fire science, geography, geology, health science and others "can take ‘Introduction to GIS’ (GEOG 1100/ENTK 1505) to learn more about GIS and acquire basic GIS mapping skills that will make them more employable after school," Sun noted. The class will be offered during the day Monday and Wednesday from 10 to 10:50 a.m. with a lab on Tuesday and Thursday from 9 to 10:50 a.m.

The other GIS class offered for the spring semester, "Management and Implementation of GIS" (GEOG 2490) is for those students who want to advance their GIS skills and have an introductory knowledge of GIS. Students taking the Wednesday night class "will learn GIS and mapping techniques that would potentially be performed if the student had a job using GIS on a daily basis," Sun said.

The third class, "Introduction to GPS and Maps" (GEOG 1080) will be taught on Tuesday nights. Students will "learn basic map reading, the basics of GPS, how to operate a GPS, and how to upload and download data from a GPS into various mapping software packages on the computer," said Sun.

TopFor more information or to register, call Casper College at 268-2100 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu. Spring semester begins Tuesday, Jan. 16.

 

Wednesday, January 3, 2007
ARENA REGISTRATION SET FOR JANUARY 12

The final day for students to register before spring classes begin will be Friday, Jan. 12 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Arena registration gives all students who have applied and been accepted to Casper College, but who have not yet registered, the opportunity to meet with an advisor in their field of interest and sign up for classes. No appointment is necessary. Each student will be given a login and pin number at registration so that they can access WebAdvisor, the online registration system, according to Alison McNulty, enrollment services coordinator.

"Each student’s advising session will last between 15 and 45 minutes, but the convenience of this, (coupled with WebAdvisor), is that they can meet with an advisor and then can leave and not have to go over to admissions and stand in line to get classes entered into the system," said McNulty.

"Some advisors will register the students right there in the gym. Others will have the students register themselves. It depends on the instructor. To use WebAdvisor, all the student needs is a computer with Internet access. There will be computers available for student use in the computer lab in the Administration Building, Room 6," she said.

McNulty noted, however, that for the best selection of classes students should register prior to arena registration.

A new student orientation will also be held and is "for the first-time college student or those starting college again. All who attend will be able to discover what Casper College has to offer from study resources to financial aid, housing to student clubs and organizations and more," said Kirstie Auzqui, senior admissions representative. Auzqui noted that prizes and giveaways would be given to all who attend orientation.

Spring semester begins at Casper College on Tuesday, Jan. 16. The final day for late registration is Friday, Jan. 19. To RSVP for the new student orientation or for more information call 268-2100, toll free at 800-442-2963 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Wednesday, January 3, 2007
T-BIRDS OPEN SECOND HALF OF SEASON

The Casper College men’s basketball team hopes to pick up where it left off when it takes the court tonight against the College of Eastern Utah.

Coach Gary Becker expects it to be a tough task. The T-Birds (9-4) will be short-handed against the Eagles, who won the first meeting between the two teams 82-79 in Casper’s home opener back on Nov. 3. Since then, Becker’s T-Birds have won nine of 12 games, including eight in a row at one point.

Two players missed airline connections and fell victim to snowstorms, so Becker expects only to field seven or eight players in the second half opener. Sabahudin Hodzic, the Birds’ 7-2 center, was one of the missing players Tuesday. Hodzic was driving back from Texas and ran into a snowstorm in southern Colorado. He hopes to be in Price tonight for the game. Josh Davis, the team’s leading scorer (15.5 per game), missed practices the past two days because of airline difficulties but should be there by game time.

Becker said Matthew Powell, a freshman from Toronto, has been dismissed from the team. Powell was averaging three points per game.

Angelo Hill’s women’s team is on the road in Arizona this week. The T-Birds (9-4) play Chandler-Gilbert College Thursday night, Arizona Western Friday and Yavapai College on Saturday.

A trio of sophomores has led the way thus far for the Lady T-Birds. Carine Reimink and Mary Brown are averaging double figures, while Magdalena Pawlaczyk is averaging eight points per game. The guard line has been solid as well and Hill expects Kelly Fargen, a freshman from Glenrock, to be back in the lineup Thursday. Fargen suffered a broken leg in November.

Hill said Linda Harris, a freshman from Chicago, has left the team.

TopThe T-Bird men play Trinidad State Jan. 11 at home. Both T-Bird teams host Northeastern Colorado Jan. 13.

 

Wednesday, February 28, 2007
“PERFECT PLAY” COMES TO KRAMPERT THEATRE

Shakespeare’s “As You Like It,” called “the perfect play for Wyoming,” will be performed at the Gertrude Krampert Theatre Friday, March 2 through Saturday, March 10.

Set in two locales, the court of Duke Frederick and the “idyllic” Forest of Arden, “As You Like It” has as its theme “the benefit of country life over the overly civilized, socialized and structured life of the court or city life,” says director Tom Empey.

More importantly, perhaps, is that this “perfect play for Wyoming” is one brimming with humor and understandable language. “This is so easy to follow and understand, and it is really a very funny comedy,” notes Empey.

In addition to the comedic aspects, the college’s production of “As You Like It” includes five songs composed for the show by James Olm, Casper College musical theatre instructor. “The songs Jim has composed are very important to the romantic and comedic aspects of this show,” Empey says.

The show also boasts an actual pool of water on stage as part of the representation of the Forest of Arden. “Sean McIntosh, our theatre design instructor, has created a spectacular set for this play featuring both the court of Duke Frederick and a fantasy forest. The set feels huge,” says Empey.

Not to be outdone, Douglas Garland, Casper College theatre costuming instructor, has created costumes that Empey calls flowing, colorful, and very much in the tradition of the late medieval and early Renaissance period.

The cast has also embraced the play. Empey notes that the two-minute wrestling scene was staged by freshman Tyson Smith. “Tyson has a background in pro wrestling and has done a great job staging this scene,” Empey says.
“As You Like It” will begin each night at 7:30 p.m. on the McMurry Main Stage of the Krampert Theatre. The Thursday, March 8 show will be signed for the hearing impaired. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for students 5 to 18.
Tickets may be purchased on line at www.caspercollege.edu/theatre or by calling 268-2500, toll free 800-442-2963, ext. 2500 or at the box office one hour before each show. The box office is open daily from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.

 

Monday, February 26, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE ALUMNI NAME SCHOLARSHIP WINNER

The Casper College Alumni Association has released the name of its winner for the Casper College Alumni Association Outstanding Student Scholarship, Lenee Ann Chamberlain of Douglas, Wyo.

According to Linda Nix, alumni coordinator, academic achievement is the highest selection criteria for the scholarship, but community involvement and financial need are also taken into consideration. Chamberlain was awarded $2,000 for the spring 2007 semester.

Chamberlain, a returning sophomore is studying pre-physical therapy at Casper College. “Without completing my college education, I could not be a physical therapist,” says Chamberlain.

Upon graduation from Casper College, Chamberlain plans to transfer to the University of North Dakota where she plans to pursue her doctorate in physical therapy. “I would like to work in a hospital that has a ward for children, and eventually open a camp for children who need physical therapy,” she says.

Chamberlain, who is from Douglas, Wyo., is the daughter of Roy and Cheryl Chamberlain, also of Douglas.

For more information about the Casper College Alumni Association Outstanding Student Scholarship and other scholarships available at Casper College log on to www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Monday, February 26, 2007
Award Presentation

Enzi Accepts 2007 National Education Service Award
United States Senator Mike Enzi accepts the 2007 National Education Service Award from Casper College President, Walter Nolte. The award was given to Enzi by the Association of Community College Trustees and the American Association of Community Colleges during its Annual Legislative Summit held in Washington, D.C. February 12 through 14. Enzi “was recognized for his strong advocacy of community college priorities while he was Chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee.” Enzi noted that community colleges “educate hundreds of people and train them to do their jobs. They are the backbone of America; they can change direction on a dime and meet the needs of the community and state.
(Photo courtesy American Association of Community Colleges.)

 

Monday, February 26, 2007
COLLEGE ANNOUNCES MARCH MEETING TIMES

The Casper College District Board of Trustees will hold their March board meeting on Tuesday, March 20 beginning at 7 p.m. in the Strausner Student Center, Room 217.

Prior to the board meeting the trustees will hold its work session and finance meeting from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Strausner Student Center, Room 207.

All meeting minutes and schedules for the board are available on the Casper College Web site at www.caspercollege.edu/community.

Top Both meetings are open and the public is invited to attend.

 

Thursday, February 22, 2007
T-BIRD LADIES HOPE TO FINISH STRONG; PREPARE TO HOST REGION IX

Casper College women’s basketball coach Angelo Hill says there are two advantages to his team hosting the Region IX post-season tournament.

First, his team doesn’t have to travel and sleep in a motel room. But second, and perhaps most important, the T-Birds will only have to play three games if they can last in the single-elimination event. The winner of the Region IX tournament advances to the national tournament in Salina, Kan. in late March, a trip Casper has not made since 2000.

The Women’s Region IX Tournament begins March 4 at Casper College, sandwiched right in between the two high school state tournaments. Tickets for the event will be general admission. An adult four-day pass is $20, and single-day passes are $6. Students are $4 per day.

Twelve teams will play in the tournament. Casper, Miles City, Northeast Nebraska and Northeastern Colorado earned first-round byes. First round games will be played Sunday at 1, 3, 5 and 7 p.m. The second round will run at the same times, with Casper playing the late game Monday night. Semi-final games will be played Tuesday at 5 and 7, with the championship scheduled for 6 p.m. Wednesday.

The Men’s Region IX Tournament begins March 3 in Scottsbluff. Casper College will play at 3 p.m. Saturday (March 3) against Dawson College (Mont.). If the T-Birds win their first round game, they would play at 3 p.m. Monday. The men’s games can be heard live on KVOC Radio (1230 AM).

Here are the first and second round games of the women’s tournament to be held in Casper:

Sunday (March 4)
Western Nebraska vs. McCook (Neb.), 1 p.m.
Otero vs. Western Wyoming, 3 p.m.
Northwest Wyoming vs. Dawson (Mont.), 5 p.m.
Sheridan College vs. Little Big Horn (Mont.), 7 p.m.

Monday (March 5)
Northeast Nebraska vs. Western Nebraska-McCook winner, 1 p.m.
Miles City (Mont.) vs. Otero-Western Wyoming winner, 3 p.m.
Northeastern JC (Colo.) vs. Northwest Wyoming-Dawson winner, 5 p.m.
Casper vs. Sheridan-Little Big Horn winner, 7 p.m.

 

Wednesday, February 14, 2007
COLLEGE OBSERVES EATING DISORDERS WEEK WITH EVENTS

The Casper College Counseling and Student Development Center will join colleges across the country as they observe Eating Disorders Awareness Week February 25 through March 3.

“Casper College will be offering educational and screening activities during the week, which are free and open to the public,” says Joanne Theobald, student services counselor.

The documentary film “Thin” will be shown on Tuesday, Feb. 27 at 6:30 p.m. in the Saunders Health Science Center, Room 224. According to Theobald, the film was an official selection of the 2006 Sundance Film Festival, and “will take the audience inside the walls of Renfrew Center, an inpatient treatment facility for eating disorders.” A short discussion will follow the film showing.

A mental health screening for eating disorders will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 28 in the Casper College Counseling and Student Development Center located in Room 112 in the Administration Building from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
For those who would like to remain anonymous, an online screening can also be taken by logging onto: www.mentalhealthscreening.org/screening/welcome.asp.

“In the United States, as many as 10 million females and one million males are struggling with the devastating, life-threatening effects of eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. It is estimated that 25 million more suffer from binge-eating disorder,” says Theobald “We hope to promote awareness of and education about eating disorders during this week.”

For more information, contact the Casper College Counseling and Student Development Center at 268-2366.

 

Wednesday, February 14, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE TO HOST MATH CONTEST

Casper College will again be the site for the Casper region of the Wolsborn-Drazovich State Math Contest on Tuesday, Feb. 27.

The Wyoming Council of Teachers of Mathematics holds the contest, which also takes place in nine other regions throughout the state.

According to Jack Webb, district director and mathematics instructor at Casper College, the contest is open to seventh through 12th grade students, and each school may enter any number of students.

Students in grades 11 and 12 compete in Class A, those in grades nine and 10 compete in class B, while 7th and 8th graders compete separately. Individual and team honors will be awarded based on the highest scores. The state winner will be determined from all the statewide results.

Mathematics students from Natrona Converse County schools compete in the yearly event in the Casper region.

The contest will begin at 9 a.m. and an awards ceremony will be held at 1:15. The Topawards ceremony is free and open to the public.

For more information call Casper College at 268-2372.

 

Wednesday, February 14, 2007
RENAISSANCE TOPIC OF 22ND ANNUAL HUMANITIES FESTIVAL

“Renaissance Revisited” will be the theme for the 22nd Annual Humanities Festival at Casper College March 1 and 2.

“The first humanities festival in 1986 at Casper College also had a Renaissance theme, Shakespeare specifically, with Casper College English instructor Margaret Demorest as the keynote speaker. During this year’s festival the Renaissance will be revisited for understanding of new scholarship in the field,” says Anne Rognstad.

“The festival will feature both local and national scholars of western European Renaissance literature, social theory, music, and art history. Festival scholars will share their expertise in the humanities in 45-minute sessions followed by 10-minute audience question and answer periods,” notes Rognstad, festival co-director.

The festival will begin at 9:45 a.m. on Thursday with a welcome and opening remarks by Casper College President Walter Nolte. At 10 a.m. Brian Steele of Texas Tech University will provide an overview to the era and then discuss how images of Mary Magdalene evolved during the Renaissance, due to issues involving sexuality and theology. “Dr. Steele’s presentation will prepare participants for the specialized lectures during the festival,” says Valerie Eggemeyer, festival co-director.

At 11 a.m. Tom Empey, Casper College chair of the theatre department, will discuss the upcoming college production of “As You Like It” and Shakespearean humanism and the Shakespeare theater. Empey is also directing the college’s production of Shakespeare’s “As You Like It,” which is running in conjunction with the humanities festival and begins on Friday night, March 2 at 7:30 p.m.

The daytime events on Thursday will end with the 2 p.m. presentation by Amy Vail of Baylor University. Vail “explore the music of John Dowland, the great Renaissance writer of lute songs,” Eggemeyer says.

Two evening events will also be held on Thursday, the first a selection of Renaissance music performed by Kristi and George Armijo at 7 p.m. followed at 8 p.m. by the Demorest Lecturer, Robert Cohen of UC-Irvine, who will speak on the Renaissance theater.

Friday’s presentations will begin at 9 a.m. with Christine Sperling of Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, who “will discuss the patronage that led to the creation of some of the most well-known Renaissance works such as Donatello’s ‘David,’ says Eggemeyer.

At 10 a.m. Jean Tichenor, Casper College music department chair, and Casper College vocal students will perform compositions in both the sacred and secular idioms composed by Josquin Desprez. According to Eggemeyer, Desprez represents the climax of the 15th century Franco-Netherlandish musical tradition.

Anne Leader, from the City College of New York, will look at how religious images functioned in the daily lives of Europe’s faithful in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries. She’ll also examine how, where and when these images were viewed, and how they enriched and enlivened religious practice and spiritual life. Leader’s presentation will begin at 11 a.m.

The festival will conclude with a panel and audience discussion moderated by Bruce Richardson, associate professor of English at the University of Wyoming/Casper College Center. “The scholars who participated in the humanities festival will expand on their presentations and answer questions from the audience,” says Rognstad.

That evening the Casper College Gertrude Krampert Theatre will present Shakespeare’s “As You Like It.” Tickets for the play are $12 for adults and $10 for those 18 and under. All other humanities festival events are free and open to the public, and all presentations will occur on the McMurry Main Stage in the Krampert Theatre on the Casper College campus.

The 22nd Annual Casper College Humanities Festival and Demorest Lecture is sponsored by the Wyoming Council for the Humanities, ARTCORE, the Casper College Division of Language and Literature, the University of Wyoming/Casper College Center, the Casper College Foundation, and Casper College.

For more information, call Casper College at 268-2110 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Tuesday, February 13, 2007
FOOD OF ITALY TIES TO HUMANITIES THEME!

The food of Italy will be the focus of the next Casper College ethnic dinner on Thursday, March 1 from 5 to 6:45 p.m. in the Roberts Commons Cafeteria.

The Italian theme is in support of the 20th Annual Casper College Humanities Festival and Demorest Lecture. This year’s theme for the Humanities Festival is “The Renaissance Revisited.”

The Italian menu will consist of antipasto salad with roma tomatoes and fresh mozzarella, marinated mushroom salad, multi-bean salad, tossed salad with dressings, vegetarian minestrone soup, Italian meatballs, Italian sausage, vegetarian lasagna, clam linguine, fried calamari, mussels marinara, garlic bread sticks, focaccia bread and for dessert, tiramisu, spumoni ice cream and almond cookies.

Tickets for the Italian dinner are $8 in advance and only available through Friday, Feb. 23. Advance tickets can be purchased at the Roberts Commons Cafeteria Monday through Thursday from 7 to 9 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4:45 to 6:45 p.m.; at the coffee bars located in the Administration Building and the Wold Physical Science Center between the hours of 8 a.m. and 1 p.m., and in the Casper College Office of Accounting and Financial Management from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Tickets will also be available at the door the night of the dinner at a cost of $9.50 for adults. All ticket sales are cash only.

The Casper College Diversity Committee sponsors the Italian ethnic diversity dinner. One more ethnic diversity dinner will be held on April 12 when Polish food will be served.

 

Tuesday, February 13, 2007
TOURNAMENTS LOOM AS MUSTANGS GALLOP INTO ‘THE SWEDE’ FOR CENTRAL SUB-REGION SHOWDOWNS

Tonight (Wednesday), Casper College hosts Western Wyoming College in a pair of games that have a lot of bearing on next month’s regional tournaments.

The women’s game could determine the Region IX tournament host. Much has been made about last Saturday’s 4-point loss by the Lady T-Birds at Scottsbluff. That game was big because the winner of the central sub-region (includes Western Nebraska, Western Wyoming and Casper) earns the right to host the Region IX tournament in early March. In losing by only four, Casper took the advantage over Western Nebraska, since the T-Birds won by five points at home.

That sets up tonight’s showdown against a very talented Western Wyoming squad. Although Ken Swartz’ team has lost both sub-region games thus far, the Mustangs (18-6, 0-2) are not eliminated from hosting the tournament themselves. A win tonight over Casper and a win over Western Nebraska on Saturday would throw things into a three-way tie.

The T-Birds (18-6, 2-1) want to end all speculation tonight. To do that they will rely on their inside tandem of Carine Reimink and Magdalena Pawlaczyk, who average 20 points and 12.5 rebounds between them. The T-Bird towers have been tough to stop, especially when Mary Brown and Leah Stepovich are hitting from the outside. Lizzy Cooper sets the table from her point guard position.

The T-Birds will be facing the best shooting team in the region. The Mustangs shoot 41.7 percent overall and 39.5 from behind the 3-point arc. Shandryn Trumble, the sophomore from Green River, leads WWC in scoring at 12.3 per game. Kallie Arrington, the Mustangs’ inside threat, averages 10.4. Madison Croft is the top rebounder on the team (5.2 per game).

Much rests on the men’s game tonight as well. With a victory, the T-Birds would clinch the top seed from the central sub region. After tonight Casper has one game left in sub region play, Feb. 20 against Eastern Wyoming. Since the T-Birds own the tiebreaker over Laramie County, a win tonight clinches the top seed. The men’s tournament is scheduled for March 3-7 at Western Nebraska (which won the east sub region and the right to host).

Coach Gary Becker knows that earning a top seed would put his T-Birds on the opposite side of the bracket from fifth-ranked Northeastern Junior College, which many consider to be the team to beat next month.

The Birds (13-11, 3-1) are coming off an impressive 88-76 win over Laramie County on Monday. Scott Nelson led the way with 16 points, nine rebounds and seven assists, as five T-Birds scored in double figures. After missing four games in early January, Josh Davis has found his stride again and led the way with 22 on Monday. He averages 16, while DeMarcus Richard averages 12 for Casper. Early February was tough on the T-Birds, who played at three tough houses in a row (Sterling, Trinidad and Scottsbluff). The good news is Casper has three out of four games at home to finish the regular season.

TopCorey Kaminska averages 12.6 points per game for the Casey Jones’ Mustangs (11-12).

 

Thursday, February 8, 2007
FAFSA INFORMATION SESSIONS TO BE HELD AT PUBLIC LIBRARY

Debra Starks, coordinator of the University of Wyoming’s Student Educational Opportunity Center, will conduct Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) information sessions at the Tech Center in Natrona County Public Library on Feb. 17, Feb. 24, March 3 and March 10 at 10 a.m.

Students interested in receiving federal grants, loans or work-study awards for college financial assistance are required to complete the FAFSA. The session will guide applicants through the online forms and application process.

“Most applications for college admission and financial aid are due in the spring,” said Starks. “It’s important to complete the FAFSA as soon as possible to determine how much aid you are eligible for.”

The sessions are free. Those who want to complete a FAFSA application at the session should bring their social security numbers, driver’s license, FAFSA pin numbers, W-2 forms and 2006 income tax returns or estimates to the session.

Contact Starks at 268-2483 for more information.

 

Tuesday, February 6, 2007
NGANGA RECEIVES DISTINCTIVE EDUCATION AWARD

Lydiah Nganga, assistant professor of elementary education at the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center, was recently nominated for inclusion in the 2007-2008 edition of “Who’s Who in American Education.”

The publication is printed by Marquis Who’s Who in America and has been recognizing exceptional contributors to society since 1899. This is a significant honor - an achievement in itself - that is afforded to very few individuals in the course of a lifetime, said the editors of “Who’s Who in American Education.”

“I am thrilled,” said Nganga. “It is such an honor to know that some people whose lives I have touched have bestowed upon me the highest of awards as an educator. I am encouraged to keep doing my very best to touch others with my love of education, to make a positive difference in the lives of others and to provide leadership in my areas of expertise.”

Previously, Nganga was recognized in the 2004 and 2005 editions of “Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers” for her achievements as an educator at Natrona County High School. She began teaching for the UW/CC Center in the fall semester of 2005.

 

Tuesday, February 6, 2007
ORANGE COUNTY CHOPPER CUSTOM BIKE TO BE SHOWN AT CASPER COLLEGE

A custom motorcycle “chopper” custom designed by the famous Orange County Choppers (OCC) stars of TLC’s “American Chopper” will be on display at Casper College in the new auto body shop on Monday, Feb. 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

 

Thursday, February 1, 2007
"TALKING T-BIRDS" PLACE WELL IN TOURNAMENT

The Casper College Talking T-Birds Forensics Team recently returned from competition in Billings, Mont. at a regional tournament at Rocky Mountain College.

Sophomore Joe Tilghman (Casper) was honored for ranking fourth overall from a field of 38 contestants in the Open Parliamentary Debate Speaker Awards, according to Gretchen Wheeler, forensics coach and communications instructor.

Freshman Myles Bucher (Casper) was ranked fifth out of 22 contestants in the Novice Parliamentary Debate Speaker Awards after advancing to the semi-finals round of competition in novice debate.

Freshman Shelly Dolinar (Evanston, Wyo.) and Tilghman "both lead the team by advancing to the final rounds in multiple events. Shelly placed sixth in both Prose Interpretation and Dramatic Interpretation, while Joe placed fifth in Persuasive Speaking and sixth in Duet Interpretation with his freshman partner Michelle Anderson, (Morrill, Neb.).

The team will compete in two more regional tournaments before attending the International Forensics Association in Buenos Aires, Argentina over spring break. The Topteam will close out the year with the National Phi Rho Pi Tournament in Houston, Texas.

 

Thursday, February 1, 2007
JUDGING TEAM CONTINUES WINNING WAYS

The Casper College Livestock Judging Team has added five first places and one reserve win to its already impressive season.

At the Arizona National in Phoenix, the team took an amazing five first overall wins, one each in sheep, hogs, beef, reasons and overall.

"Eight of the top 11 individuals from the entire contest were Casper College students. I was pleased by the outstanding performance by all team members and I believe that this is a great indication of the depth and quality of our judging students," says Heath Hornecker, livestock judging team coach and chair of the Casper College Agriculture Department.

The team was led by Nicole Thomas (Pavilion, Wyo.) who took third high individual swine and high individual in beef, reasons and overall. Randell Von Krosigk (Shoshoni, Wyo.) was close on Thomas's heels with a third high in reasons, second overall and high individual sheep.

Tyler Kralicek (Manning N.D.) took a fourth overall in the contest and swine and a third overall in sheep. Kayla Auen (Casper) won seventh high individual, Mason Oswald and Morgan Nash (both of Pocatello, Idaho) placed, with Oswald taking fifth high in sheep and eighth overall and Nash taking fifth in swine and ninth overall.

Taylor Ostergaard (Durango, Colo.) received 10th high individual, Megan Mavencamp (Hagerman, Idaho) took 11th high individual and Tyler Gray (Moorcroft, Wyo.) received fourth high in beef.

Also participating at the Arizona National were Sarah Butler, (Bliss, Idaho), Kim Thayer, (Quincy, Wash.) and Jordan Wells, (Colstrip, Mont.).

The team turned in a "strong performance" at the National Western Stock Show in mid-January. "Our students continue to excel at these contests," says Heath Hornecker, livestock judging team coach and chair of the Casper College Agriculture Department.

The team took second in swine, sheep and reasons, fourth in cattle and were the reserve champion team overall.

Individually Von Krosigk took high individual in swine and reasons, second high individual overall and sixth high individual in sheep. "Randell is establishing himself as one of the elite in the country," notes Hornecker.

Auen, who Hornecker says "has been the one to beat in national competition all year," took first in high individual in beef, fourth high individual overall and eighth high individual in both swine and reasons.

Thomas took seventh high individual in reasons. "Nicole had a strong showing in this competition following her national win in Phoenix," Hornecker says. Other team members included Kralicek and Nash.

This is just a superb group of young men and women to work with. The 12 sophomores have a cumulative grade point average of over 3.5. They are great judgers and great students alike and with their success at Casper College they are beginning to receive recruiting calls from universities all over the United States," says Hornecker.

Tuesday, March 27, 2007
ANNUAL WELLNESS CONFERENCE TO INCLUDE VARIETY OF ISSUES

With a variety of important topics to be discussed, the Casper College Wellness Conference will be held March 28 through 30.

“This conference is intended to provide participants with current information on wellness-related issues,” says Keith Cross, conference director.

According to Cross, conference presentations will include a look at chronic pain, depression, sensitivity training, medical acupuncture, substance abuse treatment, recovery and many other interesting topics.

The Friday day-long workshop will feature training to introduce participants to indigenous foundations for effective therapy and the “new” ethical guidelines impacting licensed professional counselors in Wyoming, according to Cross.

Hosted by the Casper College Counseling and Student Development Center, all conference presentations are free and open to the public, except the therapy workshop, which has a fee of $30 for either the morning or afternoon session, or $50 for the entire day per person. The conference will begin each morning at 9 a.m., with Toppresentations going on throughout the day in Room 217 of the Strausner Student Center. For more information, to register for Friday’s workshop, or to receive a schedule, contact Cross at 268-2604.

 

Friday, March 30, 2007
SPRING BAND CONCERT CANCELED, TO BE RESCHEDULED

The Casper College Concert Band performance scheduled for Saturday, March 31 at 7:30 in Durham Hall has been canceled. A new date will be announced later.

 

Tuesday, March 20, 2007
IRAQ CONFLICT FOCUS OF PRESENTATION AT CASPER COLLEGE

Well-known Catholic theologian Bryan Hehir will present a free lecture, “The Iraq Debate: Politics, Strategy and Ethics” on Wednesday, March 28 at 7 p.m. at the Gertrude Krampert Theatre on the Casper College campus.

Hehir, currently the Parker Gilbert Montgomery professor of the practice of religion and public life at Harvard University, is also the secretary for Social Services and the president of Catholic Charities in the Archdiocese of Boston.

“Reverend Hehir will challenge the audience to think about how we approach critical issues in life and the pros and cons that are involved,” says Jane Sullivan, Casper College Board member.

According to The Harvard Crimson, in December of 2002, Hehir “voiced opposition to the invasion of Iraq at an Institute of Politics forum, invoking the ‘just war’ theory of early Catholic philosopher St. Augustine. ‘War is only moral when it is absolutely necessary,’ Hehir told students.”

Hehir was secretary of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops when the bishops issued their influential letter on nuclear weapons in 1983, “The Challenge of Peace – God's Promise and Our Response.”

Hehir served on the faculty of Georgetown University (1984 to 1992) and the Harvard Divinity School (1993 to 2001). His writings include: The Moral Measurement of War: A Tradition of Continuity and Change; Military Intervention and National Sovereignty; Catholicism and Democracy; and Social Values and Public Policy: A Contribution from a Religious Tradition.

Following his lecture, Hehir will take questions from the audience. The lecture is free and open to the public and is sponsored by the Catholic Diocese of Cheyenne, the University of Wyoming/Casper College Center and Casper College.

 

Tuesday, March 20, 2007
STUDIO 24 – COLLEGE ARTISTS CREATE NEW WORKS FOR SALE

The Casper College Visual Arts Department will present “Studio 24,” a two-day event culminating in a silent auction at the Nicolaysen Art Museum on Friday, March 30 from 7 to 9 p.m.

According to Valerie Eggemeyer, visual arts department chair, all Casper College art students are invited to stay in the Visual Arts Center all night on beginning on Thursday, March 29 and create a work. “The theme is television, and students can do any media. We don’t know exactly what will be done until that night, but I am sure that painting, sculpture, photography and printmaking will be included,” Eggemeyer says.

The works will then be set for display at the NIC where the public is invited to the free silent auction on Friday. Proceeds from the silent auction will go to the students and the Casper College Visual Arts Department.

Dress for the auction will be casual. Refreshments and live jazz music will be provided during the silent auction, which is free and open to all.

 

Tuesday, March 20, 2007
DENVER TRIP FEATURES ZOO AND ROCKIES GAME

A spring weekend in Denver offers Casper College and University of Wyoming/Casper College Center students and their families a big city weekend for a rock bottom cost.

Single travelers will pay only $25 for the trip, complete with lodging, a trip to the zoo and a Denver Rockies professional baseball game. For families sharing a room, the cost is only $100.

The Casper College Student Activities Board (SAB) is sponsoring the weekend event, April 28 and 29. According to Jamie Demmitt, the SAB has been offering the Denver trip for the last several years. “It is a nice way for students to economically get away. They don’t have to worry about driving in the big city. Plus, our hotel is located right in downtown Denver off the 16th Street Mall so everyone will have plenty to do and see during their free time on Saturday night.”

The trip cost includes transportation, lodging (maximum of four per room), a pass to the Denver Zoo and a Denver Rockies game where the Rockies will play against the Atlanta Braves. “This is an affordable way for our nontraditional students to get away with their children. And it is great for our traditional students too. A lot of people who go on this trip have never been to a zoo or seen a professional baseball game before,” says Demmitt, student activities coordinator.

Those taking the trip will be responsible for their meals, but Demmitt notes that everyone is welcome to pack their cooler and bring it along. The two-day trip will begin at 6 a.m. on April 28 with buses arriving back in Casper on April 29 around 10 p.m.

Reservations are being taken on a first-serve, first-come basis, and are limited to 110 Toppeople. For more information, or to register, stop by the main desk in the Strausner Student Center, or call Demmitt at 268-2638.

 

Tuesday, March 20, 2007
SHORT CLASS TO TEACH AFFORDABLE ENERGY EFFICIENCY FOR HOUSE

A half-semester class designed to teach students the techniques available to improve the energy efficiency of existing and new houses with an emphasis on low cost methods will begin on March 22 at Casper College.

The class, “Energy Efficient Houses” (CNTK 1490) will be held on Thursday evenings from 6 to 9 and will provide students with real-life examples.

“This class will not only provide students with information about what they can do to improve the energy efficiency of their own homes but will look at actual materials – windows, insulation, HVAC systems, and more,” says Megan Graham, instructor.

According to Graham students who complete the class will be able to determine the proper type of insulation, conduct ventilation tests to determine airflow, and select appropriate passive solar methods, energy efficient lighting and building materials.

In addition, the class will perform a true energy audit on the Casper College Greenhouse and come up with ways to make a future building on the Casper College campus energy efficient. “This last project will give students more freedom to research out areas that are of interest to them,” Graham says.

For more information or to register for the course contact Casper College at 268-2100.

 

Friday, March 16, 2007
GETT – GIRLS EXPLORING TOMORROW’S TECHNOLOGY KICKOFF SET

Girls in grades 7 through 12 will get a chance to explore technology hands-on during the GETT (Girls Exploring Tomorrow’s Technology) kickoff event on Saturday, March 24. The free event will be held at the “Swede” Erickson Thunderbird Gym at Casper College.

“Young girls rob themselves daily by saying that they can’t do something, like pursue a career in technology. They believe that they have to be really math minded, and the fact is they don’t,” says Karla Volpi, organizer. “GETT is a great opportunity for girls to learn the facts about how technology careers can be fulfilling, fun and rewarding personally, professionally and financially,” Volpi notes.

The day will begin with registration from 8 to 8:45 a.m. Pre-registration is preferred, and can be done by logging onto www.caspercollege.edu/forms/gett.html. Four different 25-minute learning sessions will be held and girls will rotate between them.

“Inside the Box” will give girls exposure to the inside of a computer. Led by Donielle Williams, Casper College computing coordinator, girls will learn, among other things that “the computer won’t bite,” says Volpi.

“Robotics” led by Megan Graham, Casper College electronics technology instructor, will give girls a chance to see hands-on how robotics are driven by technology and what is involved in the process.

“GPS” (Global Positioning Systems) will be led by Melissa Connely, Casper College geology instructor. Connely will show girls how GPS works and discuss the many applications for GPS.

The fourth topic session will allow girls to participate in an interactive videoconference with girls from Chester County Pennsylvania’s GETT event. “This will be a fun interactive session where girls will play games with their Chester County counterparts to win prizes,” Volpi says.

The day will end with lunch which will begin at 11:45 a.m. Shirley Collier, CEO of the wireless technologies firm Optemax LLC, will be the guest speaker during lunch. “The day will end around 1 p.m.,” notes Volpi.

All girls are urged to attend, because, according to Volpi, it makes no difference what a girl’s life-long ambition is “she will still interact with technology – the better she understands it, the better she will be able to do her job.”

Volpi, Casper College information technology director at Casper College, says that in general technology jobs are good paying jobs. “Even if you are not in a technology job, if you know technology that can help your employer you become hard to get rid of if not indispensable,” she says.

Volpi became involved with GETT when she worked in Pennsylvania and became involved with the Innovative Technology Action Group in Chester County. After she moved back to Casper, Volpi decided that the program would be a great fit for Wyoming girls.

“Wyoming is supposed to be the equality state, but in truth it’s not. There are a lot of women in this state that believe they are stuck in traditional jobs and I want them to realize that technology is out there and can help bail them out. Technology is a great equalizer between men and women. If you know what you are doing in technology, you will do just fine. The best geeks are women,” Volpi says.

In addition to the four sessions and lunch, participants will also be eligible to win an Apple iPod. “Those who pre-register will actually have two chances to win an iPod,” says Volpi. For more information contact Volpi at 268-3018 or by emailing her at kvolpi@caspercollege.edu.

 

Thursday, March 15, 2007
“WOMEN OF ALCOVA” TOPIC OF WOMEN’S HISTORY CELEBRATION

“Women of Alcova” will be the topic of the 23rd Annual Women’s History Celebration at Casper College’s Goodstein Foundation Library on Thursday, March 22 from 2:30 - 4:30 p.m.

According to Kevin Anderson, organizer, sisters Minnie Stevens and Vina Bower will speak about the women of Alcova, tell stories about their own experiences in Alcova, and may relate some stories that were told to them as well.

“At different times, Minnie and Vina and their families owned and operated Sloane’s General Store in Alcova. Vina bought the store in about 1958, and Minnie bought it from her in 1978 and ran the business until 1996,” says Anderson. “They told me a story about the 1960’s singing group, the Beach Boys, visiting their store and discovering a skunk beneath the boardwalk,” notes Anderson.

Famous products from Sloane’s included their “Alcova Special” – coffee with a dollop of ice cream, jackalope milk, ‘plush animal’ jackalopes and other jackalope products, according to Anderson.

TopThe Women’s History Celebration is free and open to the public and refreshments will be served. Stevens and Bower will begin their presentation at 3 p.m.

 

Wednesday, March 14, 2007
BIG NAMES ARE GONE; T-BIRD MEN IN REBUILDING MODE

CC women poised to make springtime run toward a CRMR title Garrett Henry is gone. Karlon Knudson has packed up his saddle and said farewell. Tucker Sheets has moved on, too. Those three and four other T-Bird cowboys who scored points a year ago – and helped lead Casper College to a strong third-place finish in the Central Rocky Mountain Region – have departed.

With a lack of college experience among his red-vested cowboys this year, Casper College rodeo coach Tom Parker is realistic. “We’re pretty young,” he says. “But if we have a respectable spring I think we can finish among the top five.”

The Central Rocky Mountain Region season resumes next Friday at Eastern Wyoming College, with eight rodeos on tap over the next nine weeks.

A couple of CC sophomores – O.J. Huxtable (Douglas) in the steer wrestling and Jake Hamilton (Casper) in the tie down roping – have high hopes and the confidence of their coach as the second half of the year gets underway. Huxtable stands ninth in his event heading into next week.

Parker looks for Jimmy Roedeske (Cartwright, N.D.), who works the three timed events, and K.C. Schell (Glenrock), steer wrestling, to score some points and possibly make a run at the top three this spring. Chris Robinette (Powder River) is another cowboy to watch; he stands seventh in the team roping after the fall half of the season.

While the men’s team is rebuilding, Parker’s women’s team is building momentum. The T-Bird coach thinks his cowgirls have a bonafide chance at finishing in the top two in the region and qualifying for the College National Finals.

Clarissa Tavener (Rigby, Idaho) stands third in the barrel racing after the fall half. Freshman Katie Felix (Lander) is second in the breakaway roping going into the spring, while Kylee Rinehart (Highmore, S.D.) is sixth in the breakaway. Rinehart will be unable to compete at EWC because she will be with the T-Bird women’s basketball team at the national tournament next week. Tavener, according to Parker, “is capable of beating anyone on a given Sunday.”
Three other T-Birds – Surrey Nugent (Big Piney) and Carla Weiser (Wheatland), who work all three events, and breakaway roper Staci Miller (Gillette) should contribute this spring as well.

Going into the spring season, Casper stands fifth in the team standings with 335 points. While the University of Wyoming had built a commanding lead by November (1,270 points), second place Northeastern (Colo.) is less than 300 points ahead of Casper – well within reach, according to Parker.

“If they perform the way they are capable we should be very strong,” Parker says of his women’s team.
One event the T-Birds hope to improve on is the goat tying, where they were shut out in the fall. The arrival of Heidi Knapp as Parker’s assistant should make a difference. Knapp is a three-time regional goat-tying champion.
Parker says this year’s women’s contingent reminds him of the team that qualified for the CNFR in the mid-‘90s, a team led by Knapp’s sister Natalie, Tara Anderson and Bobby Fortier (now Talmadge).

“I think this team has that kind of talent,” Parker says.
On the men’s side, the University of Wyoming leads the team standings going into the EWC rodeo with 1,530 points. Central Wyoming is second with 1,480 and Eastern Wyoming third with 1,385.
The CRMR visits Colorado State March 30-April 1. After a week off, Casper College will host its annual Ropin’ and Riggin’ Days Rodeo April 13-15.

 

Wednesday, March 14, 2007
T-BIRDS OPEN NATIONAL TOURNAMENT TUESDAY VS. NO. 4 ODESSA

The Casper College women’s basketball team will open national tournament play next Tuesday morning in Salina, Kan.

The National Junior College Athletic Association released the bracket late Wednesday, and the T-Birds will play the tournament opener at 9 a.m. MDT against Odessa College (Texas). The T-Birds come into the game having won eight consecutive games, including the 14-point decision over Western Nebraska in the Region IX championship game. Odessa (28-2) is ranked No. 4 in the latest NJCAA poll,. The T-Birds are the 14 seed in the tournament; Odessa the No. 3 seed.

CC coach Angelo Hill says he is looking forward to the challenge. “To be the best, you have to beat the best,” he said after practice Wednesday. “Actually, I think this is a good matchup for us. We already know some things about them. We will have to attack their zone defense and shoot well from the outside. I know we will play good defense.

“It’s a great honor to go to the national tournament, and I know this team will go down there and represent our community well. Some of our players have worked two years for this opportunity.”

Casper College is making its first appearance since 2000 in the NJCAA national tournament. Win or lose in the opening round, the T-Birds will play Wednesday evening in the double elimination tournament.

The national tournament games can be heard live on KVOC Radio (1230 AM).

 

Wednesday, March 14, 2007
CC’S CHORALE, UNRUH AND PATTON TO PERFORM AT CAM-PLEX

The Casper College Collegiate Chorale will perform in concert with the Gillette Chamber Singers and the Powder River Symphony in a performance of Gabriel Faure’s “Requiem” Saturday, March 24 at the Cam-plex Heritage Center in Gillette, Wyo. at 7:30 p.m.

Eric Unruh, Casper College piano instructor and chair of the fine arts division at the college, will also perform during the concert as the guest performer in Beethoven’s “Choral Fantasy” written for orchestra, piano soloist, and choir.

“The performance of both of these selections will be under the baton of Steven Trinkle, former Casper College band instructor,” says Patrick Patton, Casper College voice and choir instructor.

TopTickets are $12 for adults and $10 for youth and seniors and can be purchased online by logging onto www.cam-plex.com or by calling 307-682-8802.

 

Wednesday, March 14, 2007
ART SHOW CELEBRATES RETIREMENT OF LONG-TIME INSTRUCTOR

The retirement of long-time Casper College drawing and painting instructor Richard Jacobi is being celebrated in “Molting,” a retrospective and new work exhibit of his art now through Friday, March 30 at the Goodstein Gallery.

Jacobi began his career at Casper College in the fall of 1981. Since that time his works have been displayed throughout the region. According to Jacobi, “Molting” is “about shedding skins and growing while retaining an integrated body of work through a period of 16 years.”

Jacobi’s works are both delicate and complicated in their final form. “Mountains, pools, waterfalls, and the phenomenon of growth are often inspirations for my imagery as they express the changing forms of nature and the animating breath of life,” says Jacobi.

“Occasionally a specific idea directs an image. More often than not, the image has a life of its own; analogies come later. I have a healthy regard for the process of art, believing that the quality of the finished product is implicit in the intensity and purity of the study, which must include spontaneous new-ness as a primary component. Hence, art becomes very much like the process of nature itself,” Jacobi says.

A reception will be held on Thursday, March 22 from 3 to 6 p.m. in the Goodstein Gallery. The gallery is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Both the exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.

The Goodstein Gallery is located in the Visual Arts Center on the Casper College campus.

 

Tuesday, March 13, 2007
SECOND ANNUAL ROCKHAI FEATURES LOCAL BANDS

The Casper College Bakkhai will present the Second Annual Rockhai on Saturday, March 24 at the Gertrude Krampert Theatre on the Casper College campus.

The Bakkhai (Association of Theatre Performance and Technical Students) uses the proceeds from the concert to help cover the costs of trips theatre students take throughout the school year for educational purposes, according to Dustin Jones, theatre technical director at the college.

This year’s concert will feature Notch, We’re All At War, Waiting For Ten, Dead Ashore and several others. “There will be something for all ages at this concert by these local groups including rock, metal and some punk,” says Jones.

Tickets are $10 at the door and doors open at 5 p.m. with the show set to start at 6 p.m.

 

Tuesday, March 13, 2007
COURSE EXAMINES WYOMING’S LAND, WATER CONNECTION

“Topics: The Land and Water Connection in Wyoming” (ENR 4890/5890), offered through the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center this fall, will focus on the effects of residential and industrial growth on Wyoming.

Anne MacKinnon, a part-time instructor for the UW/CC Center, will lead the class in discussions about the potential impact of newly constructed housing, Wyoming’s vulnerability due to scarce water resources and the effects that residential and industrial growth will have on the state.

“The course will focus on the challenges such problems pose to an assortment of communities across the state,” said MacKinnon, “and the innovative approaches Wyoming communities are taking.”

During class, students will choose an issue to research and then develop options for handling the problem. In lieu of an exam, they will compile their research results into a final written and oral presentation.

“Students will get acquainted first-hand with people involved with these issues from around the state, and will get a chance to grapple with some aspect of a current real-life land-water impact problem in Wyoming,” MacKinnon added.

Six presentations will be given by community experts on related topics during the course, as part of the UW/CC Center’s regular fall lecture series on natural resource issues. Students are expected to attend for course credit and public attendance is encouraged.

Contact the UW/CC Center at 268-2713 for more information on this and other interesting courses.

 

Monday, March 12, 2007
FOLTZ TO PRESENT COLLEGE 101

Kyla Foltz will present “College Info. 101” at Casper College on Thursday, March 22 and again on Thursday, April 12.

The free three-hour class is designed to show high school seniors and juniors the value of a college education, and how to go about getting that education.

“Studies show that students with an associate’s degree will earn $1.6 million over their work life compared to someone with just a high school degree who will earn $1.2 million. The amount really increases for those with a bachelor’s degree who will earn $2.1 million over their work life,” says Foltz, Casper College admissions coordinator.

“It has also been found that those with a higher education have a better lifestyle, are healthier and have an improved quality of life for their offspring,” Foltz notes.

Foltz will address the increasing problem of scholarship scams. “For instance, students should never have to purchase scholarship applications, or pay a fee to submit the FAFSA (Free Application For Student Aid),” says Foltz. The availability of scholarships as well as tips on filling out forms, writing essays and not missing deadlines, grants and loans, programs of study available at Casper College, the admission process and career opportunities in Wyoming will also be discussed.

“There are many employable careers in Wyoming and I will share with students the education needed to be employed in those careers,” Foltz says.

Registration is required for the free event. Both will run from 6 to 9 p.m. and will be held in the Thorsen Institute of Business, Room 310.

TopFor more information or to register call the college at 268-2100 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Monday, March 12, 2007
CASPER REGION MATHMATICS CONTEST RESULTS RELEASED

Results for the Casper region of the Wolsborn-Drazovich State Math Contest have been released. The contest is open to seventh through 12th grade students from Natrona and Converse County schools, and each school may enter any number of students. The Wyoming Council of Teachers of Mathematics holds the contest, which also takes place in nine other regions throughout the state.

According to Jack Webb, director and mathematics instructor at Casper College, once results are tabulated from all regions a state winner will be determined.

The following are the results in all four classes: A - 11th and 12th grade; B - ninth and 10th grade; 8th grade, and 7th grade. According to Webb a team score is also kept in Class A and Class B and are tabulated by the top three scores from each school.

Class A Results:
Individual Places:
1. Luke Ginsbach, Kelly Walsh High School, 745
2. Jeff Stamp, Natrona County High School, 700
3. Caleb Atwood, Kelly Walsh High School, 600
4. Daniel Bulfer, Kelly Walsh High School, 525
5. Jay Shah, Natrona County High School, 495
6. Eric Yeager, Natrona County High School, 480
7. Todd Cheney, Kelly Walsh High School, 455
T8. Amber Lebsock, Kelly Walsh High School, 435
T8. Derek Beamer, Kelly Walsh High School, 435
10. Chris McAulay, Kelly Walsh High School, 425
 
Team Scores:
1. Kelly Walsh High School, 1870 points. Luke Ginsbach, 745; Caleb Atwood, 600 and Daniel Bulfer, 525.
2. Natrona County High School, 1675 points. Jeff Stamp, 700; Jay Shah, 495 and Eric Yeager, 480.
3. Douglas High School, 865 points. Liz Brown, 340; Sonja Erickson, 280 and Sally Gray, 245.
4. Midwest High School, 815 points. Brendan Fiorini, 330; Derek Smith, 275 and Kristin Steiner, 210.
5. Glenrock High School, 710 points. Michael Hedges, 340; Nick Allington, 225 and Laura Dobler, 145.

Class B Results:
Individual Places:
T1. Derek Sibrel, Glenrock High School, 505
T1. Korlee Adams, Kelly Walsh High School, 505
T3. Parker Blakeley, Glenrock High School, 485
T3. Jamie Wiggins, CY Jr. High, 485
5. Joseph Bearnson, CY Jr. High, 475
6. Kendra Nelson, Kelly Walsh High School, 470
7. Joseph Cotton, Glenrock High School, 455
T8. Casey Hoskinson, Glenrock High School, 445
T8. Gloria Wickman, Natrona County High School, 445
10. Brendon Park, Kelly Walsh High School, 435

Team Scores:
1. Glenrock High School, 1445 points. Derek Sibrel, 825; Parker Blakeley, 485 and Joseph Cotton, 455.
2. Kelly Walsh High School, 1410 points. Korlee Adams, 505; Kendra Nelson, 470 and Brenden Pard, 435.
3. CY Junior High School, 1380 points. Jamie Wiggins, 485; Joseph Bearnson, 475 and Kevin Crank, 420.
4. Natrona County High School, 1220 points. Gloria Wickman, 445; Samantha Marquard, 430 and Jonathan Greer, 345.
5. Centennial Jr. High School, 655 points. Aaron McComas, 275; Robert Yarbro, 205 and John Stepansen, 175.
6. Midwest High School, 275 points. Merena White, 150; Kaitlyn Bain, 115 and Kahel Chapman, 10.
7. Douglas High School, no team score. Jennifer Butler, 170.

Seventh Grade:
Individual Places:
1. Ashley Brown, Centennial Jr. High, 590
T2. Ashley Terry, CY Jr. High, 560
T2. Michael Harden, Centennial Jr. High, 560
4. Laura Stamp, Dean Morgan Jr. High, 540
5. Miller Colton, CY Jr. High, 515
T6. Ryan Boner, Glenrock Middle School, 475
T6. Liz Meyer, CY Jr. High, 475
8. Daniel Dahlby, Dean Morgan Jr. High, 455
9. Morganne Juarez, Frontier Middle School, 420
10. Cooper Moore, Douglas Middle School, 395

Eighth Grade:
1. Saxon Bull, Douglas Middle School, 730
2. Marja Ritchie, Douglas Middle School, 585
3. Brittany Myler, CY Jr. High, 545
T4. Lindsay White, Douglas Middle School, 535
T4. Brian Schlidt, Centennial Jr. High, 535
6. Mitch Espeland, Douglas Middle School, 515
7. Kevin Buffington, Centennial Jr. High, 500
8. Rebecca Downs, Glenrock Middle School, 480
Top9. Ted Huss, Centennial Jr. High, 445
10. Ray Varland, Douglas Middle School, 420

 

Monday, March 12, 2007
PRESIDENT’S HONOR ROLL AT CASPER COLLEGE ANNOUNCED

Casper College officials have released the names of students who made the President’s Honor roll at Casper College for the 2006 fall semester. To qualify, a student must take at least 12 hours and receive a grade point average of 3.5 pr better. They are:

Rebecca M Moore Albin, WY
Shannon H Jackett Alcova, WY
Bailey A Moberly Aurora, CO
Aleya R Alvarez Bar Nunn, WY
Kristina M Gray Bar Nunn, WY
Miles E Krieger Big Piney, WY
Andrew J Springman Big Piney, WY
Kierstin M Smothermon Billings, MT
Michael S Hage Boise, ID
Cassie H Essington Boulder, WY
Victoria R Armstrong Brule, NE
Kelsey A Cattles Buffalo, WY
Andrew F Joy Buffalo, WY
Thomas F Aitchison Casper, WY
Cheryl E Alexander Casper, WY
Tyler W Ambrosino Casper, WY
Mark A Bates Casper, WY
Richard A Bennett Casper, WY
Sheryl L Bevier Casper, WY
Jennifer A Bowden Casper, WY
Whitney M Braig Casper, WY
Donni M Brantley Casper, WY
Andrea M Brewster Casper, WY
Jeanne R Briddle Casper, WY
Andrea K Brown Casper, WY
Dee E Brown Casper, WY
Stephen M Brown Casper, WY
Mark W Bull Casper, WY
Keena M Bynum Casper, WY
Myra A Cellar Casper, WY
Rachael J Cestnik Casper, WY
Shannon D Clark Casper, WY
Rose M Cleary Casper, WY
Rebecca S Conger Casper, WY
Jason R Cory Casper, WY
Kathleen R Couey Casper, WY
Meghan E Creel Casper, WY
Kelsey W D'Arcy Casper, WY
Linda A Edwards Casper, WY
Andrew B Elston Casper, WY
Skye C English Casper, WY
Tyler J Esau Casper, WY
Andria R Fowles Casper, WY
Trisha M Frost Casper, WY
James G Gay Casper, WY
Daniel B Graff Casper, WY
Leah J Grosinger Casper, WY
Irina G Grosz Casper, WY
Jennifer K Haddenham Casper, WY
Melissa A Harris Casper, WY
Frederick J Harrison Casper, WY
Theresa A Heide Casper, WY
Benjamin J Houck Casper, WY
Audrey J Jaeger Casper, WY
Leah M Johnson Casper, WY
Tamarah L Johnson Casper, WY
Barry P Johnston Casper, WY
Morgan J Jones Casper, WY
Leah M Juarez Casper, WY
Laura B Kane Casper, WY
Kelsey L Katen Casper, WY
Jahna K Kaufman Casper, WY
Sean C King Casper, WY
Edward L Kobobel Casper, WY
Sei Hyun S Ko Casper, WY
Brigit J Kretzer Casper, WY
Yuet Fu  Lee Casper, WY
David W Livingston Casper, WY
Stephanie M Martin Casper, WY
Julie D McAulay Casper, WY
Tanya A Meek Casper, WY
Isis N Mena Casper, WY
Annessa L Miller Casper, WY
Andrea N Moncayo Casper, WY
Paul M Nash Casper, WY
Jason H Nelson Casper, WY
Keli R Ortiz Casper, WY
Shanda L Parrent Casper, WY
Jennifer J Pettry-Johnson Casper, WY
Bree M Phillips Casper, WY
Carey A Pixler Casper, WY
John M Raehal Casper, WY
Gabrielle A Reeves Casper, WY
Jennifer L Rodgers Casper, WY
Casey L Rubin Casper, WY
Gregory S Rumsey Casper, WY
Katelin A Schenk Casper, WY
Kelsey A Schulte Casper, WY
Jill M Sellars Casper, WY
Brooke N Shafer Casper, WY
Brittani L Shreve Casper, WY
Angelia D Smith Casper, WY
Tracee A Smith Casper, WY
Ashlee K Stapert Casper, WY
Kendra A Steadman Casper, WY
Denise M Steinhaus Casper, WY
TopNoel J Trost Casper, WY
David A Unruh Casper, WY
Sara C Urban Casper, WY
Sonia E Urban Casper, WY
Jennifer  Wales Casper, WY
Allyssa D Washut Casper, WY
Wesley D Wells Casper, WY
William J Whitmire Casper, WY
Cheralee J Willard Casper, WY
Kimberly A Wise Casper, WY
Jennifer L Wolfe Casper, WY
Melinda S Woody Casper, WY
Philip N Zaharas Casper, WY
Holly L Christensen Casper, WY
Consuelo Y Hernandez Casper, WY
Stephanie R McBeath-VanDamme Casper, WY
Robin L Ahrndt Casper, WY
Aimee L Albertson Casper, WY
Erin E Alexander Casper, WY
Gina M Allen Casper, WY
Whitney M Allen Casper, WY
Callie L Alspach Casper, WY
Nikki L Alvey Casper, WY
Opal A Anderson Casper, WY
Ryan M Atkins  Casper, WY
Kayla M Auen Casper, WY
Angie N Bailly Casper, WY
Veronica R Bates Casper, WY
Ashley J Benbo Casper, WY
Austin R Berlin Casper, WY
Genna M Boatright Casper, WY
Cynthia M Brachtenbach Casper, WY
William L Brummond Casper, WY
John R Bryson Casper, WY
Jeffrey J Buckman Casper, WY
Kylie C Burch Casper, WY
Carol J Burdess Casper, WY
Stephen M Centanino Casper, WY
Dena V Colgrove Casper, WY
Wayne F Cummings Casper, WY
Megan L Curtis Casper, WY
Loren P Davis Casper, WY
Anna M DiIorio Casper, WY
Gwendolyn M Doelger Casper, WY
Haley B Eley Casper, WY
Andrea S Gann Casper, WY
Katherine E Geise Casper, WY
Paul T Givens Casper, WY
J. Annette  Green Casper, WY
Cynthia G Guy-Thomas Casper, WY
Sarah J Hall Casper, WY
Christena E Isaacs Casper, WY
Alisha R Isaacson Casper, WY
Elisa M Jones Casper, WY
Traci J Keating Casper, WY
Cortnie M Keil Casper, WY
Amanda J Knudson Casper, WY
Kimberly R Kunckel Casper, WY
Jennifer M Limmer Casper, WY
Ryan C Limmer Casper, WY
Alicia L MacMillan Casper, WY
Kimberly S Maxwell Casper, WY
Tamillia K Moore Casper, WY
Kimberly R Morrison Casper, WY
Shereen D Mosier Casper, WY
Donna S Patten Casper, WY
Stevie A Patton Casper, WY
Kylie D Peck Casper, WY
Bradford L Perkins Casper, WY
Kristi L Prado Casper, WY
Paula M Reece Casper, WY
Jamie L Rodenburg Casper, WY
Tiffany D Rostad Casper, WY
Trevor A Rutar Casper, WY
Mark B Sanders Casper, WY
Hannah R Schirlinger Casper, WY
Jennifer R Schmidt Casper, WY
Sarah N Shepherd Casper, WY
Alyss M Smith Casper, WY
Heather M Smith Casper, WY
Megan L Smith Casper, WY
James A Stengel Casper, WY
Andria K Sterkel Casper, WY
Jessica R Steward Casper, WY
Tamera R Stotts Casper, WY
Andrea L Sullivan Casper, WY
Adam T Thornton Casper, WY
Sarah A Vahlberg Casper, WY
Eric C Vierkant Casper, WY
Jill R Walker Casper, WY
Cynthia I Wallace Casper, WY
Angela M Whitlock Casper, WY
Travis R Wilkinson Casper, WY
Nickolas H Will Casper, WY
Jordan K Wilmes Casper, WY
Kierah D Wonser Casper, WY
Tawney C Wylie Casper, WY
Liqun  Yang Casper, WY
Anna T Ylijarvi Casper, WY
Colleen L Zeglin Casper, WY
Tricia N Edwards Casper, WY
Jean A Johnson Casper, WY
Jade M Keller Casper, WY
Douglas L Nelson Casper, WY
Joseph L Shane Casper, WY
William A Wells Casper, WY
Tamara S Armann Casper, WY
Dustin L Asay Casper, WY
Michael B Behrens Casper, WY
Lindsey B Bell Casper, WY
Desmond C Bennion Casper, WY
Krysti L Bills Casper, WY
Jessica D Bradshaw Casper, WY
Matt C Breckenridge Casper, WY
Caitlyn C Brown Casper, WY
John R Bruno Casper, WY
Laura B Camilleri Casper, WY
Matthew K Carey Casper, WY
Jason R Carlson Casper, WY
Jacob W Clouthier Casper, WY
James H Cordonier Casper, WY
Drew A Felton Casper, WY
Robin C Ferguson Casper, WY
Briana C Flanagan Casper, WY
Jessica E Grace Casper, WY
Britnee R Greenlee Casper, WY
Tasha M Gumpert Casper, WY
Andrea L Hampson Casper, WY
Eric A Hanes Casper, WY
Jeremy M Hanneman Casper, WY
Candace J Harmon Casper, WY
Colin B Holmes Casper, WY
Matthew S Holmes Casper, WY
Christopher M Isaacson Casper, WY
Marci L Johnson Casper, WY
TopSausha L Kearns Casper, WY
Karissa D Keever Casper, WY
Lori L Kimball Casper, WY
Amy C Kinner Casper, WY
Jesse M Knoll Casper, WY
Gavin B Lawlis Casper, WY
Rebecca D McIntosh Casper, WY
Lorraine J McKenzie Casper, WY
Tami J McMillan Casper, WY
Ashley R Mikels Casper, WY
Braiden S Miller Casper, WY
Kellen W Miller Casper, WY
Torrie C Mitchell Casper, WY
Buddy J Morgan Casper, WY
Tate A Mullen Casper, WY
Laurie C Parrish Casper, WY
John M Pedroza Casper, WY
Nathan L Perkins Casper, WY
Telicia D Ramon Casper, WY
Russell W Reddick Casper, WY
Courtney L Reynolds Casper, WY
Heather N Rice Casper, WY
Christopher M Riedl Casper, WY
William D Royer Casper, WY
Kelly L Russell Casper, WY
Tracey E Schempp Dudley Casper, WY
Christina R Schulte Casper, WY
Natalie D Scissons Casper, WY
Misti F Simmons Casper, WY
Janessa R Sorlien Casper, WY
Leah M Stefansen Casper, WY
Christopher A Stone Casper, WY
Julie K Strayer Casper, WY
Erika L Swirzcki Casper, WY
Brett A Tebeest Casper, WY
Christopher D Thomas Casper, WY
Jackie M VanGundy Casper, WY
Kodi A Walker Casper, WY
Morgan L Walker Casper, WY
Justina L Wallis Casper, WY
Amber N Walsh Casper, WY
Grace M Werner Casper, WY
Jessica E Willis Casper, WY
Bridget P Wolden Casper, WY
Mattie J Wyatt Casper, WY
Shana M Zimmerschied Casper, WY
Ashley R Fulton Centerville, IA
Morgan J Hespe Chadron, NE
Brandon J Lliteras Chadron, NE
Brianna M Bohmbach Charlson, ND
Michael L Baragar Cheyenne, WY
Justin C Dykes Cheyenne, WY
Samantha K Lind Cheyenne, WY
Christopher A Poch Cheyenne, WY
Sarah N Read Cheyenne, WY
Jessica M Sell Cody, WY
Chance P Kilgore Colstrip, MT
Zachariah R McLain Custer, SD
Christina E Galindo Denver, CO
Stephen J Calderon Douglas, WY
Lenee A Chamberlain Douglas, WY
Donald L Cohrs Douglas, WY
Casey E Darr Douglas, WY
Sarah L Forgey Douglas, WY
Grant J Henson Douglas, WY
Mikah D Knopp Douglas, WY
Matthew C McCullough Douglas, WY
Adam D Pauli Douglas, WY
William L Weber Douglas, WY
Michael R Shaw Dubois, WY
Brianna R Blake Effingham, IL
Neave D Stover Englewood, CO
Shelley B Dolinar Evanston, WY
Kevin L Hutchinson Evanston, WY
Hilary B Jones Evanston, WY
Hope A Dewell Evansville, WY
Michelle A Dollentas Evansville, WY
Brandy R Dudley Evansville, WY
Ann M Fisher Evansville, WY
Melissa L Newport Evansville, WY
Tracey P Sorensen Evansville, WY
Jessica L Taggart Evansville, WY
Jordan L Wells Forsyth, MT
Gregory A Ley Fort Collins, CO
Kathryn A Rhoades Fort Collins, CO
Jamie L Barrett Fountain, CO
James R Williams Ft Collins, CO
Elizabeth M Heady Gillette, WY
Jessica M Lambert Gillette, WY
Kimberlie R Martinson Gillette, WY
Edward A Rosier II Gillette, WY
Samantha J Myers Gillette, WY
Kimberly D Bell Gillette, WY
Paul M Lempka Gillette, WY
Alex G Bailey Glenrock, WY
Melody A Dugan Glenrock, WY
Kelly A Fargen Glenrock, WY
Paula A Flynn Glenrock, WY
Kathryn K Gutierrez Glenrock, WY
Jennifer R Hendricks Glenrock, WY
Denielle R Laird Glenrock, WY
Casey K Schell Glenrock, WY
Geoffrey C Zeiger Glenrock, WY
Christian D Liedtke Green River, WY
William C Schell Green River, WY
Anna C Jennings Greybull, WY
Megan R Mavencamp Hagerman, ID
Bryan E Dixon Houston, TX
Douglas H Adam Hyannis, NE
Randi A Esplin Hyde Park, UT
Andres A Garcia Imperial, CA
Sean I Butcher Jackson, WY
Tanner T Anderson Kinsey, MT
Anna R Duncan Lander, WY
Katie W Felix Lander, WY
Ashley N McOmie Lander, WY
Madti M Reed Lander, WY
Andy J Pokorny Laramie, WY
Tessa L Huizenga Lusk, WY
Amy D Nelson Lusk, WY
Andrew W Smyth Lusk, WY
Michael O Hughes Manila, UT
Kelsey A Roberson Meeteetse, WY
Kristin W Rothaupt Menomonie, WI
Kimberly A Burgess Midwest, WY
Charlene  Shrock Midwest, WY
Carol  Alumbaugh Mills, WY
Gwendolyn C Fordham Mills, WY
Warren A Haygood Mills, WY
Veronica L Julian Mills, WY
Dianna R Kintzler Mills, WY
Janae C Morton Mills, WY
Douglas H Rigsby Mills, WY
Anna L Sell Mills, WY
TopDonna L Belcher Minatare, NE
Tyler T Gray Moorcroft, WY
Jessica C Tracy Moorcroft, WY
Ginger D Brower Mountain View, WY
Dustin P Ferguson Newcastle, WY
Ryan D Hieb Newcastle, WY
Madison C Shoop Newcastle, WY
Nicole D Thomas Pavillion, WY
Jennifer B Crandall Pine Bluffs, WY
Morgan S Nash Pocatello, ID
Mason B Oswald Pocatello, ID
Kimberly G Thayer Quincy, WA
James A Neal Rawlins, WY
Cassandra R Robinson Rawlins, WY
Kelsey M Warren Rawlins, WY
Patrick J Cosner Riverton, WY
Marta K Poff Riverton, WY
Molly A Steele Riverton, WY
Ashton L Wilcox-Brown Riverton, WY
Elizabeth A Cooper Robina Australia
Olivia J Rakness Saratoga, WY
Randell T Von Krosigk Shoshoni, WY
Afton N Meeks Sinclair, WY
Gerald H Phipps Sinclair, WY
Joseph  Guy St Paul, MN
Mary L McNally Sundance, WY
Victoria L Greet Ten Sleep, WY
Mary M Brown Thermopolis, WY
Zachariah T Hickman Thermopolis, WY
Shandi L Foos Torrington, WY
Miljana  Cejic Vrsac Serbia Montenegro
Jacob W Heath Washington, MO
Michael J Thomas Watertown, SD
Carla M Weiser Wheatland, WY
Kimzi L Bryant Worland, WY
Branden C Martinez Worland, WY
Jodi L Thiel Worland, WY
Sherri A Bertagnole Wright, WY
Graham W Boyd Wright, WY
Jessica B Gill Wright, WY
Chelsey A Kiefat Wright, WY
Mariah N Olson Wright, WY
Magdalena J Pawlaczyk Wroclaw Poland

 

Monday, March 12, 2007
DEAN’S HONOR ROLL ANNOUNCED

Casper College officials have released the names of students who made the Dean’s Honor Roll at Casper College for the 2006 fall semester. To qualify for the award, a student must have a semester grade point average of 3.5 or better. The recognition is for part-time degree seeking students (those taking six to 11 credit hours per semester) and nondegree seeking full-time students taking a minimum of 12 credit hours.

Nondegree seeking full-time students:
Mykael K Graham Bar Nunn, WY
Kevin L Condelario Casper, WY
Brandy L Talbot Casper, WY
Katie J Hubbard Casper, WY
Aaron R Bassham Casper, WY
Reid P Olson Casper, WY
Melissa L Salvato Casper, WY
Curtis A Schulz Casper, WY
Veronica  Garcia Casper, WY
Dustin S Pexton Douglas, WY
Yvonne  Niehoff New York, NY

Degree seeking part-time students:
David M Farwell Bar Nunn, WY
Sarah L Pugh Buffalo, WY
Christine A Vasco Buffalo, WY
Dan C March Canton, SD
Alison L Alleman Casper, WY
William L Allen Casper, WY
Jennifer M Baca Casper, WY
Gary A Bass Casper, WY
Stephine C Becker Casper, WY
RaeAnn  Bernat Casper, WY
Margaret L Bodyfelt Casper, WY
Melanie A Brandon Casper, WY
Kylie T Byerly Casper, WY
Maria C Carlin Casper, WY
Brooke R Chynoweth Casper, WY
Tonya R Clemens Casper, WY
Rhonda S Conner Casper, WY
Amanda L Crowley Casper, WY
Shawn W Crowley Casper, WY
Alicyn A Davis Casper, WY
Richard J Derby Casper, WY
Lillian C Dinges Casper, WY
Michael A Duffey Casper, WY
Marilyn  Dymond Wagner Casper, WY
Kimberly R Forgey Casper, WY
Jennifer L Harshman Casper, WY
Dustin D Haverlock Casper, WY
Nicole M Hool Casper, WY
Christine E Hoskins Casper, WY
Erik D Hudson Casper, WY
Amy D Hunter Casper, WY
Melissa A Hurd Casper, WY
Aryn R Hurt Casper, WY
Kathy E Johnson Casper, WY
Lisa J Johnson Casper, WY
Sharon K Johnson Casper, WY
Valeria J Johnson Casper, WY
Vicky R Kelly Casper, WY
Heidi L Kriegh Casper, WY
Tammie D Lamb Casper, WY
Gale L Lara Casper, WY
Jean F Lawlor Casper, WY
Heidi M Limmer Casper, WY
Wendy J Lucas Casper, WY
Becky S MacPherson Casper, WY
Maira A Magana Casper, WY
Jeffrey S Masters Casper, WY
Everett I Maynard Casper, WY
Kevin J McDermott Casper, WY
Ty O McDowell Casper, WY
Jade R McMichael Casper, WY
Robyn K Meyer Casper, WY
Kenith R Middleton Casper, WY
Jeanne M Miller Casper, WY
Linda B Miller Casper, WY
Violeta G Montes de Oca Casper, WY
Carolyn M Moore Casper, WY
Shelley S Nichols Casper, WY
John K Niegisch Casper, WY
William R Norris Casper, WY
Dwan G Orr Casper, WY
Duane D Ottema Casper, WY
Heather C Pauline Casper, WY
Mildred L Payette Casper, WY
Carrie A Pellegrini Casper, WY
Leslie M Plett Casper, WY
Tina K Ross Casper, WY
TopBrandy L Sargent Casper, WY
Jerry R Shafer Casper, WY
Roberta J Shepperson Casper, WY
Elisabeth E Shipley Casper, WY
Christian A Simon Casper, WY
Matthew R Simoneaux Casper, WY
Lisa M Smith Casper, WY
Scharlotte M Smith Casper, WY
Diana R Sojourner Casper, WY
Nikki L Sweets Casper, WY
Wendy K Trembath Casper, WY
Sherri L Trujillo Casper, WY
Polly S Tufly Casper, WY
Aaron S Utton Casper, WY
Emily A Ward Casper, WY
Tori E Wasserman Casper, WY
Rich N Weaver Casper, WY
Jennifer L Wells Casper, WY
Amy J Whitman Casper, WY
Tausha A Willard Casper, WY
Cherry  Yann Casper, WY
Jewel M Carlson Casper, WY
Jamie D Ostermyer Casper, WY
Emilee N Scholtz Casper, WY
Isaac A Wentz Casper, WY
Danielle D Bassler Casper, WY
Ammon S Beddes Casper, WY
Candace  Beddes Casper, WY
Dawnie E Bernat Casper, WY
Crystal R Blankenship Casper, WY
Theresa A Boid Casper, WY
Eric J Brandon Casper, WY
Kellie C Brodrecht Casper, WY
Timothy J Brown Casper, WY
Casey M Chapman-Luckenbill Casper, WY
Lesa R Daniels Casper, WY
Susan L De Leeuw Casper, WY
Kelly L DeLap Casper, WY
Sandra A Dixon Casper, WY
Stacie L Dowler Casper, WY
Brian W Eleson Casper, WY
Kelly L Gangwish Casper, WY
Jennifer L Garnier Casper, WY
Christopher K Garwood Casper, WY
Melissa A Gates Casper, WY
Erin E Gazda Casper, WY
Heather J Gilmore Casper, WY
Lea E Goering Casper, WY
Shane M Harkins Casper, WY
Tyler C Hart Casper, WY
Shannon M Hillibush Casper, WY
Andrew D Hilston Casper, WY
Courtney A Houston Casper, WY
Janet E Hoyt Casper, WY
Ryan T Hughes Casper, WY
Mario E Jimenez Casper, WY
Rebecca A Johnson Casper, WY
Jennifer E Kessner Casper, WY
Lindsey L Kirkaldie Casper, WY
Elizabeth A Kuhnel Casper, WY
Charlene M Labrum Casper, WY
Dan C LaPlatney Casper, WY
Andrea M Long Casper, WY
Corrie L Lubenow Casper, WY
Charlene R McAulay Casper, WY
Wanda K McLean Casper, WY
Ashkia L Mestack Casper, WY
James J Meyer Casper, WY
Mark D Miller Casper, WY
Stacy M Miller Casper, WY
Christine  Monson Casper, WY
Linda A Olsen Casper, WY
Acklyn N Overfield Casper, WY
Jennifer L Paad Casper, WY
Guy V Padgett Casper, WY
Melissa L Palm Casper, WY
Benjamin I Putnam Casper, WY
Ruth M Putnam Casper, WY
Elizabeth A Restad Casper, WY
Mary A Rodrick Casper, WY
Christina A Rosenof Casper, WY
Starla C Rutz Casper, WY
Zachary D Schneider Casper, WY
Stephanie A Schnitzer Casper, WY
Gayle L Schnorenberg Casper, WY
Heather A Schumann Casper, WY
Elizabeth E Shear Casper, WY
Carol L Siegel Casper, WY
Amy L Smith Casper, WY
Tiffany L Street Casper, WY
Kenneth D Summers Casper, WY
Kyler K Taubert Casper, WY
Francis M Thomas Casper, WY
Shelly A Thomas Casper, WY
Kayla G Walker Casper, WY
Troy G Wellmaker Casper, WY
Candace B Williams Casper, WY
Kimberly D Wilson Casper, WY
Carmen A Young Casper, WY
Nicole L Brown Casper, WY
Nichole M Copper Casper, WY
Kendra L David Casper, WY
Pamela J Ingle-Boland Casper, WY
Sesha N Irwin Casper, WY
Miranda O Nelson Casper, WY
Stephanie L Adams Casper, WY
Amy N Albert Casper, WY
Natasha L Badger Casper, WY
Crystal L Balerio Casper, WY
Cynthia J Bower Casper, WY
Elise M Butler Casper, WY
Dwayne E Clark Casper, WY
Emily J Claunch Casper, WY
Beth M Cross Casper, WY
Donna G Deffke Casper, WY
Sarah N Deschenes Casper, WY
Trisha L Dorough Casper, WY
Kyle J Dye Casper, WY
Meagan M Dye Casper, WY
Casey M Dyer Casper, WY
Sarah A Feeney Casper, WY
Aaron L Finch Casper, WY
Rebecca A Grace Casper, WY
Angela R Hick Casper, WY
Cheryl R Hunt Casper, WY
Talia A Jackson Casper, WY
Kimberly J Jenkins Casper, WY
Richard L Kennedy Casper, WY
Jim M Kirkendall Casper, WY
TopAnna M Lavin Casper, WY
Sarah J Lenhart Casper, WY
Rebecca S Lussier Casper, WY
William R Maggard Casper, WY
Cheryl A Mandich Casper, WY
Brandy A Martinez Casper, WY
Sherri I Martin Casper, WY
DeMetri N Moon Casper, WY
Diana R Nooney-Hough Casper, WY
Monica R Patro Casper, WY
Sarah L Phillipps Casper, WY
Russell W Poer Casper, WY
Amanda B Reinhardt Casper, WY
Ferris J Rorabaugh Casper, WY
Shelley A Sands Casper, WY
Robbin D Shaeffer Casper, WY
Howard L Shaw Jr Casper, WY
Heather L Sides Casper, WY
Evan L Slafter Casper, WY
Steven S Smith Casper, WY
Kayci L Stripling Casper, WY
Gregory H Tanner Casper, WY
Darrin A Tromble Casper, WY
Kody J Wheeler Casper, WY
Tanesia L Sternhagen Casper, WY
Lisa K Chadwick Douglas, WY
Connie M Harn Douglas, WY
Renee T Kane Douglas, WY
Kwenna M Swanson Douglas, WY
Carman R Adams Evansville, WY
Shannan E Daley Evansville, WY
Marlo S Ferris Evansville, WY
Marshall T Jefcoat Evansville, WY
Susan M Mayo Evansville, WY
Cody E McVay Evansville, WY
Shad Q Rodgers Evansville, WY
Christina A Zarate Evansville, WY
Renee M Manzanares Fort Washakie, WY
Lindsey L Delauter Gillette, WY
Amanda L Puls Gillette, WY
Kristina A Deiss Gillette, WY
LouAnn  McClure Gillette, WY
Tyler  McLaughlin Gillette, WY
Bridget A Neal Gillette, WY
Jessica M Barnes Glenrock, WY
Carolyn M Bell Glenrock, WY
David F Bolte Glenrock, WY
Katie M Fargen Glenrock, WY
Cari M Knerr Glenrock, WY
Andrew H Kruse Glenrock, WY
Andrea D Nelson Glenrock, WY
Reid Z Phifer Glenrock, WY
Katrina R Rasmussen Glenrock, WY
Justin J Scott Glenrock, WY
Jessica L Wright Glenrock, WY
Rebecca S Figgins Green River, WY
Deb  Knudsen Green River, WY
Mariah  Lesoon Grover, WY
Kimberly K Trefren Jackson, WY
Jenny L Bly Kaycee, WY
Shirley M McKenna Kaycee, WY
Lori C Straub Kaycee, WY
Terra M Hubenka Lander, WY
Stanley L McDowell Lander, WY
Douglas G Zimmer Lewistown, MT
Jeanine S Larson Lusk, WY
Dana L Dolenc Mills, WY
Heather A Pickett Mills, WY
Linda L Schulz Mills, WY
Leann R Stover Mills, WY
Brenda K Mahoney Moorcroft, WY
Lynn C Busskohl Newcastle, WY
Christopher S Dutcher Newcastle, WY
Jody L Purviance Newcastle, WY
John T Hink Onalaska, WI
Robert J Tomac Rapid City, SD
Cherie L Hicken Rawlins, WY
Corinne R Schisel Rawlins, WY
Kathy  Skelley Rawlins, WY
Jessica M Bath Riverton, WY
Katheleen K King Riverton, WY
Angela L Lake Riverton, WY
Sundell R Lepe Riverton, WY
Jeanine M Morgan Riverton, WY
Frankye S Chandler Sheridan, WY
Theresa J Hamilton Sheridan, WY
Antoninette  Kassen Sheridan, WY
Hollee A Lane Sheridan, WY
Amanda J Larue Sheridan, WY
Kylee J Apland Thermopolis, WY
Janet K Broers Torrington, WY
Mark L Estes Torrington, WY
Jamie J Foltz Torrington, WY
Kyle T Buxton Trabuco Canyon, CA
Brady G Balzan Wheatland, WY
TopMerri M Miller Worland, WY
Samuel T Shaffer II Wright, WY

 

Thursday, March 8, 2007
KENNEDY-MILLIKEN SCHOLARSHIP AVAILABLE

Applications are now being taken for the Jacob Kennedy – Emily Milliken Scholarship. The scholarship will provide $750 to one Natrona County High School and one Kelly Walsh High School graduating senior planning to attend Casper College full time (12 credits or more a semester.)

The scholarship was established in September 2006, by the families of Kennedy and Milliken in memory of the teens who were killed in an automobile accident on Alcova Highway July 4.

To qualify, applicants must have a grade point average of at least 2.5 and be eligible for the Hathaway Scholarship and be committed to making reasonable progress toward the degree they are seeking.

In addition, successful applicants must “demonstrate their commitment to an active and balanced lifestyle including participation in school activities, have a record of community service both in and beyond school, and have a positive vision of their career life goals and objectives,” says Paul Hallock, Casper College Foundation director.
“We are pleased that these two families have established this scholarship in honor of their children and hope that N.C. and K.W. seniors will take advantage of this opportunity,” Hallock added.

Applications are available in the counselor’s office at both N.C. and K.W. and at the Casper College Financial Aid Office located in the Administration Building, Room 114. Completed applications must be received by Monday, April 9.

 

Thursday, March 1, 2007
ALCOHOL, COMMUNITY TOPIC OF UW/CC FACULTY FORUM

Ernie Johnson, lecturer of criminal justice for the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center, will address alcohol usage and its effects on the community in a faculty research forum on March 7 from 12 – 1:30 p.m. at Casper College’s Strausner Student Center, Room 217.

His presentation will incorporate information received from a two-year study conducted by the Wyoming Association of Sheriffs and Chiefs of Police and funded by the Wyoming Department of Transportation, the most recent data having been collected from all 23 counties in Wyoming.

The study shows statistics of individuals from each county who were arrested for driving under the influence, public intoxication and other alcohol-related offenses. Alcohol was a factor in more than 60 percent of the arrests made in the two-year study, while 25 percent of offenders jailed in Wyoming were arrested for driving under the influence. According to the study, the average blood-alcohol content for persons who were arrested for driving under the influence was .1639, more than double the blood-alcohol content legal limit of .08.

“We need to figure some solutions,” Johnson said. “Alcohol is driving a lot of our issues.”

Casper recently established a liquor task force that is working on issues involving alcohol that are impacting the community. The task force is actively trying to find solutions that will make a difference, said Johnson.

 

Wednesday, February 28, 2007
“PERFECT PLAY” COMES TO KRAMPERT THEATRE

Shakespeare’s “As You Like It,” called “the perfect play for Wyoming,” will be performed at the Gertrude Krampert Theatre Friday, March 2 through Saturday, March 10.

Set in two locales, the court of Duke Frederick and the “idyllic” Forest of Arden, “As You Like It” has as its theme “the benefit of country life over the overly civilized, socialized and structured life of the court or city life,” says director Tom Empey.

More importantly, perhaps, is that this “perfect play for Wyoming” is one brimming with humor and understandable language. “This is so easy to follow and understand, and it is really a very funny comedy,” notes Empey.

In addition to the comedic aspects, the college’s production of “As You Like It” includes five songs composed for the show by James Olm, Casper College musical theatre instructor. “The songs Jim has composed are very important to the romantic and comedic aspects of this show,” Empey says.

The show also boasts an actual pool of water on stage as part of the representation of the Forest of Arden. “Sean McIntosh, our theatre design instructor, has created a spectacular set for this play featuring both the court of Duke Frederick and a fantasy forest. The set feels huge,” says Empey.

Not to be outdone, Douglas Garland, Casper College theatre costuming instructor, has created costumes that Empey calls flowing, colorful, and very much in the tradition of the late medieval and early Renaissance period.

The cast has also embraced the play. Empey notes that the two-minute wrestling scene was staged by freshman Tyson Smith. “Tyson has a background in pro wrestling and has done a great job staging this scene,” Empey says.

“As You Like It” will begin each night at 7:30 p.m. on the McMurry Main Stage of the Krampert Theatre. The Thursday, March 8 show will be signed for the hearing impaired. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for students 5 to 18.

Tickets may be purchased on line at www.caspercollege.edu/theatre or by calling 268-2500, toll free 800-442-2963, ext. 2500 or at the box office one hour before each show. The box office is open daily from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.

 

Thursday, March 1, 2007
CAT IN THE HAT HEADS TO THE BEACH FOR READING EVENT

Dr. Seuss’s popular “Cat in the Hat,” the Casper College Student Wyoming Education Association (SWEA) club and the Natrona County Public Library (NCPL) are hosting a Read Across America event on Monday, March 5 from 7 to 8 p.m. in the library.

“To honor the good doctor and celebrate the fun and value of reading our celebration brings a beach front theme to the library. Children may search for seashells in a kiddie pool, compete in the hula hoop contest, catch some fish, do the limbo, have their faces painted or participate in any of the other activities planned for the event,” says Nancy Vreeland, Casper College paraeducator instructor and coordinator. Of course, the Cat in the Hat will be on hand to entertain as well.
Each child attending the event will receive a book to keep, courtesy of the Casper College SWEA. “Our goal is to show community children the joy of reading,” says Vreeland.

Top The event is free and open to all children. Parents are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Monday, April 30, 2007
HARP RECITAL FEATURES STUDENT AND GUEST ARTISTS
 
Casper College sophomore music performance-instrumental major Cynthia Bower will give a recital on the harp on Friday, May 4 at 7 p.m. in Durham Hall, located in the Aley Fine Arts Center.

Bower, the student of Casper College harp instructor Connie Wallace, will perform several solo pieces and also some ensemble pieces. For the ensemble pieces Bower will be joined by Casper College instructors Jianjun He and Wallace as well as Marianne Mabey and Gary Pehrson.

“Classical and Celtic music will be the mainstay of the program selections,” says Deanna Dyer, academic program support specialist. In addition, listeners will also be treated to American folk songs and spirituals.

The recital is free and open to all, and a reception will follow.

 

Monday, April 30, 2007
SHARMAN ANNOUNCES T-BIRD RECRUITING CLASS

A pair of Wyoming hitters, one from Star Valley and one from Kaycee, headline the Casper College volleyball recruiting class which was announced Monday by the school.

Afton’s Vanessa Muir and Kaycee’s Breanne Tobin join Cherise Bona of Taylorsville, Utah and Savanna Searle of Shelley, Idaho as the newest Thunderbirds, according to coach Angel Sharman.

Sharman said she likes what the newest signees bring to the program. “I’m excited because these are great young ladies on and off the court,” Sharman said. “I think they will have a big impact for us. We’ve got shoes to fill but I think they can do that. They should make our sophomores step up.”

Muir is a 6-foot middle blocker who earned all-state honors for coach Brandy Taylor and the Lady Braves. She participated in basketball and track and was a state 3A high jump champion as a junior. Muir received the Distinguished Scholastic Achievement award following her junior year.

Tobin, a 5-6 setter/outside hitter, had 164 kills last fall for the Buckaroos. She was a two-time all-conference player for coach Maggie Hokanson.

Bona is a 5-10 outside hitter who captained her team for two years at Taylorsville High School. She averaged 11 kills and three blocks per match as a senior.

Searle is a 5-9 setter who comes from an outstanding Shelley High School program that earned Academic State Champion team honors three years in a row. Searle co-captained both her volleyball and basketball teams and was named to the all area team in volleyball.

Sharman’s Casper College team figures to be one of the favorites in Region IX next season. She has three players returning who earned post-season honors as freshmen to a T-Bird team that finished runner-up in the Region IX tournament.

The T-Bird coach loses Academic All-Americans Shandi Foos (Yoder) and Kylie Peck (Casper-Natrona), along with Amy Nelson (Lusk), Afton Meeks (Rawlins) and Brooke Baker (Dubois).

During her six-year tenure as CC coach, the Thunderbirds have averaged more than 30 match wins per season and won the regional championship in 2003.

 

Monday, April 30, 2007
CASPER HOSTS UW OUTREACH SCHOOL INFORMATION SESSION

Representatives of the University of Wyoming Outreach School and Casper College will present information to Casper area residents about statewide educational opportunities in an open forum on May 8 at 6:30 p.m. in the Doornbos Student Lounge in the Casper College Administration Building.

Attendees will learn about various programs that are offered through the UW Outreach School, how distance education works, financial aid opportunities, and general course delivery methods. Admission forms, informational documents, transcript evaluations and academic advising will be available.

Presenters from the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center will include Brent Pickett, director and associate dean of the UW Outreach School, Scott Seville, associate dean of the UW Outreach School and professor of zoology, Dianne Davis, coordinator of undergraduate advising, and Rod Thompson, assistant professor of technical education. Casper College will be represented by Kyla Foltz, admissions representative.

“This will be a forum where potential students can learn about the higher education possibilities that are open to them, whether at the associate’s, bachelor’s, or master’s degree level,” said Pickett. “The University of Wyoming and Casper College will have representatives available to answer the full range of questions persons might have, without having to go from office to office.”

For more information, contact the UW/CC Center at 268-2713.

 

Thursday, April 26, 2007
JAZZ COMBOS HEADLINE METRO

Two Casper College jazz combos will be headlining at the Metro Coffee Company on Sunday, April 29 beginning at 6 p.m.

According to Robert Kleinschmidt, both the Mary Combo and the Tracy Pfau Combo will be in concert at the popular coffee house playing a wide variety of recognizable jazz tunes.

Kleinschmidt, Casper College woodwind instructor, directs the Mary Combo while Pfau, Casper College guitar and jazz instructor, directs the Tracy Pfau Combo.

TopThe concert is free and open to all.

 

Thursday, April 26, 2007
CAST IRON DUTCH OVEN COOKING CLASS SET

A one-day class in cast iron Dutch oven cooking is being offered through Casper College on Saturday, May 5 from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.

“Dutch Oven Cooking” (CMSV 0119 80) will instruct students on the types of cast iron, how to season, clean and store cast iron, and choices of heat sources, according to Jan Burnett, co-instructor.

“Carolyn Buff and I will help students discover the joy of Dutch oven cooking on this one-day outing to Edness Kimball Wilkins State Park, located east of Casper. Students will have fun preparing, cooking, and enjoying a complete dinner,” said Burnett.

In addition, students will learn the history of the area along the North Platte River and the Oregon Trail, and will receive a Dutch oven cookbook to take home, said Burnett.

To register or for more information, call Casper College at 268-2100.

 

Friday, April 27, 2007
CC RUNS FIRST SOAP BOX DERBY

Casper College is inviting everyone to come join the fun and excitement of its first-ever Casper College Soap Box Derby Car Race today beginning at 8 a.m. and lasting until noon.

The derby will feature over 30 races in a double-elimination tournament. Races will begin at the top of the hill near the Thunderbird Gymnasium, past the Gertrude Krampert Theatre on the right and around the corner ending on the north side of the Aley Fine Arts Center.

In addition to the race action, breakfast will be served and music provided during the entire event. In addition to the best of show, there will also be a best of costume contest for all spectators.

Spectator parking will be at the Gertrude Krampert Theatre Complex parking lot. The Casper College Soap Box Derby Car Race is free and open to all.

 

Tuesday, April 24, 2007
T-BIRDS’ REIMINK SIGNS WITH COLORADO STATE

Carine Reimink helped bring the Casper College women’s basketball team back to prominence this season.

Colorado State University hopes she can do the same. The 6-1 power forward signed a national letter of intent Tuesday to play basketball in Fort Collins for the next two seasons.

Reimink helped the T-Birds win 48 games over the past two seasons. She earned NJCAA All-America honors after averaging 10.6 points and 6.5 rebounds per game as a sophomore.

A native of Gold Coast, Australia, Reimink was an all-Region IX and all-tournament performer this season.

Angelo Hill said Reimink picked Colorado State because the school has a good physical therapy program. “That’s what we want for our kids; that they meet their academic needs first, and then find a good fit where they can play basketball,” Hill said, adding that Reimink had narrowed her choice to CSU and San Diego State.

Reimink, for at least two games, will be playing against her former teammate next season. When CSU plays at the University of Wyoming, she will likely match up against Justyna Podziemska. Two other T-Bird teammates, Kylee Rinehart and Lizzie Cooper, have signed to play with the University of Northern Colorado.

 

Tuesday, April 24, 2007
BROWN SIGNS WITH NEBRASKA-OMAHA

Casper College guard Mary Brown, the inside-outside threat who helped lead the T-Birds to a national junior college tournament appearance this year, will be playing for Nebraska-Omaha next season.

The Thermopolis native signed her letter of intent Tuesday. Brown returned to Casper College this year after a freshman season at the University of Wyoming. She averaged 10 points and 5 rebounds per game as a sophomore and earned all-Region IX honors for the T-Birds, who finished the season at 26-9.

“Academically Mary has made a great choice,” CC coach Angelo Hill said. “She wants to be a dentist someday and Omaha is a great place for her to pursue her studies. We are very happy for Mary and wish her the very best.”

 

Tuesday, April 24, 2007
OCHILTREES SAY GOODBYE TO CASPER COLLEGE AND TOWN
Farewell retirement reception set

A retirement reception will be held in honor of Casper College employees Jim and Barbara Ochiltree.

Ochiltree has been employed at Casper College since August 1985. His wife began work at the college two years later in 1987. Ochiltree is currently the vice president of student services and Mrs. Ochiltree works in the Adult Basic Education (ABE)/GED Center in recruitment and retention.

“We hope that community members will come join the Ochiltree’s many colleagues and friends as we wish them a fond farewell from Casper College and Casper,” says Lisa Icenogle, information coordinator.

TopThe free reception will be held on Friday, April 27 from 1 to 4 p.m. in the Doornbos Student Lounge located in the Administration Building.

 

Tuesday, April 24, 2007
“FLIGHT” TAKES WING MAY 4

The final play of the 2006-2007 academic year will begin on Friday, May 4 in the Black Box Theatre in the Gertrude Krampert Theatre Complex.

“Flight,” an original play by Arthur Giron, tells the story of the Wright Brothers. Beginning in 1900, Kitty Hawk, N. C., the story then moves in flashback to 1879 and Dayton, Ohio, the home of the Wright family. The play then continues to shift backward and forward in time, and between Dayton and Kitty Hawk, according to Rich Burk, director.

A playwright and educator, Giron was named “one of our best contemporary dramatists” by critic Rosette La Mont when his play “Edith Stein” premiered in New York. Giron is a founding member of The Ensemble Studio Theatre in New York and was head of the Graduate Playwriting Program at Carnegie Mellon University (where he was given the Hornbostel Award in Teaching Excellence). Since then, he has held workshops all over the country. “Flight,” recently completed a national tour of 120 cities, said Burk.

The play was originally suggested to Burk by Jim Olm, music theatre and voice instructor. “When Jim suggested ‘Flight’ last year, it was with the idea that we could have Arthur come to campus and work with our students,” says Burk. “When I met Arthur in New York last August, I found a man who is filled with passion for theatre, and anxious to share that passion. What a wonderful example he has been for our students here at Casper College,” Burk notes.

Originally written without music, “Flight” has become a musical of sorts thanks to the composing talents of Olm. According to Olm the music represents many emotions reflective of the characters in the play. “The audience will hear the songs and representations of father Milton Wright’s dreams for his sons – those of religious, traditional hymnology music. Then on the other side of the spectrum, the audience will also hear the songs and representations of Orville and Wilbur’s personal dreams of flight – those of impressionistic, 20th century ‘Debussian’-type music,” says Olm.

“Flight” will run May 4 and 5 and May 8 through 12 beginning each night at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for students ages 5 to 18 and are available at the Krampert Theatre box office (open 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday), by calling 268-2500, by logging on to www.caspercollege.edu, or one hour before show time for that show only. Tickets will go on sale Monday, April 30.

 

Monday, April 23, 2007
PIANISTS TO PERFORM IN RECITAL

Listeners will be treated to not one, but two pianists performing in a free recital on Sunday, April 29 at 3 p.m. in Durham Hall, located in the Aley Fine Arts Center.

Casper College music education students Paula Flynn, (Glenrock, Wyo.), and Sherri Bertagnole, (Wright, Wyo.) will perform separately, and end the recital in a duet by Ravel.

According to Eric Unruh, two Kabalevsky (an important 20th century Russian composer) works will be performed. “A set of ‘Variations’ explores new, creative ways to manipulate melodic material. The ‘Sonata No. 3 in F Major’ is a monumental work in three movements, with expressive ties to the Romantic period, mild 20th century dissonances and energetic rhythms, lyricism that can hypnotize the listener, and a distinctive, unmistakable Russian sonority.  Both works, perhaps new to Casper audiences, are accessible to the listener,” says Unruh, fine arts division chair and piano instructor at Casper College.

The duet to be performed by Flynn and Bertagnole, “Mother Goose Suite” by Maurice Ravel, is a famous work in five movements “that has charmed audiences for years, in both it's original piano duet form, and an orchestral arrangement Listeners will enjoy hearing Ravel's interpretation of ‘Tom Thumb,’ ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ ‘The Enchanted Garden,’ and more. The Flynn/Bertagnole performance is very sensitive, intimate, and colorful,” notes Unruh.

“This concert will showcase the brilliance, talent, technique, and superb musicianship of these two fine pianists, says Unruh.

According to Unruh, both pianists are recipients of the Charles and Cara Lou Chapman Piano Scholarship, established by the late “Chappy” Chapman to encourage excellence in piano performance.

Flynn has an A.F.A. in music education with an emphasis in piano performance from Casper College. Bertagnole is a freshman piano major at the college. Both pianists study with Unruh.

A reception will follow the performance.

 

Monday, April 23, 2007
REIMINK, PAWLACZYK EARN ALL AMERICA HONORS FROM NJCAA

Carrine Reimink and Magdalena Pawlaczyk, the twin towers who helped Casper College to its first Region IX championship in six seasons, have both been named to the National Junior College Athletic Association’s All America team.

Pawlaczyk is a two-time all Region IX player from Wroclaw, Poland. She averaged 9.7 points and 7.6 rebounds per game. She is on her way to Texas-San Antonio next season. Reimink is a two-time all Region IX tournament player who averaged 10.6 points and 6.5 rebounds her sophomore season. Reimink has narrowed her choices for next year to San Diego State and Colorado State.

‘We think this is the first time in program history that Casper College has had two players from the same team make the All-America team,” said coach Angelo Hill, who led the T-Birds to a 26-9 season. “It’s a real tribute to two young ladies who have meant a great deal to our program.”

Reimink and Pawlaczyk both earned “honorable mention” honors.

T-BIRD NOTES:
Pawlaczyk was one of the players to receive additional accolades at the Casper College awards banquet last week. Pawlaczyk was honored with the Jean Wheatley award, given to young ladies for their efforts on the court and in the classroom. Wheatley, the former athletic director at Casper College, presented the award. Andy Pokorny, a sophomore from Laramie, received the Warren Winter “Mr. T-Bird” award, which recognizes scholarship, citizenship and on the court performance. Kylie Peck, a sophomore from Casper Natrona, was named the outstanding volleyball player. TopPokorny, an all Region IX performer, announced last week that he has signed a letter of intent to play basketball next season at Regis College in Denver.

 

Monday, April 23, 2007
BECKER LANDS TWO MORE IN-STATE STARS

Casper College men’s basketball coach Gary Becker announced Monday that he has signed two more in-state players to national letters of intent.

Ryan Allen, a 6-8 post player from Torrington, and Marshall Kelly, a 6-5 swingman from Laramie are the latest signees for Becker. They join 6-2 guard Brian Ridgeway of Kelly Walsh and 6-4 Louis Ferguson as the newest Thunderbirds. Ridgeway signed last week and Ferguson, from Burns High School, just spent a red shirt season with the T-Birds and will be a freshman next fall.

Both Allen and Kelly earned first team all-state honors. Allen was recently honored as the top player in the panhandle region by the Scottsbluff Star Herald newspaper. He averaged 21 points and eight rebounds and helped the Trailblazers to a fourth-place finish in the state 3A tournament.

“Anytime you can sign somebody from Wyoming with his size it’s good,” Becker said. “His best playing years are ahead of him, and I know he will work hard to be a good player at this level.”

Kelly was the fifth leading scorer in Class 4A this past season. He led the Plainsmen on that improbable run through the post season, where they shocked Gillette and Evanston in the state tournament and ultimately finished runner-up to Casper Natrona. Kelly averaged 16 points and 10 rebounds during the tournament. He scored 25 points in the Plainsmen’s upset of Rock Springs at regionals.

“When I watched Marshal during the state tournament I liked him more with every game,” Becker said. “He’s the type of player that I like because he works hard at both ends of the floor.”

Becker guided the T-Birds to a 17-13 record and a runner-up finish in the Region IX tournament in his first year as CC’s men’s coach. He said that one of his goals going into the off-season was to sign as many Wyoming and regional players as he could.

“My goal was to land the best players in the state,” he said. “I think we have done that.”

Becker hopes to sign one or two more Cowboy State players, too. “I’m pleased with what we have been able to do so far,” he said.

The T-Bird coach said he hopes to sign four or five more players before wrapping up his recruiting efforts. Five players, including all-Region IX forward Josh Davis and point guard David McKinnie, are expected to return next season for Becker.

 

Monday, April 23, 2007
LVC HONORS LOCAL EDUCATOR

Literacy Volunteers of Casper (LVC) honored local educator Jim Zierden with its Community Recognition Award at its banquet recently.

LVC is housed under the Adult Basic Education (ABE)/GED Center at Casper College. Each Tuesday the center runs three GED student orientations for those new to the GED program.

“Jim voluntarily comes to these new student orientations every week, and has for the past two years,” says Connie Coleman, ABE/GED instructor. “As the representative from the Natrona County School District, when it is Jim’s turn to speak, he begins by congratulating each student for pursuing the GED. In his soft-spoken, caring way, he offers to meet with students over a cup of coffee to find out why they’ve left school, adds Coleman.

Through his visits with these students, Zierden tries to “find out if there is something that the school district can do to recapture the student and what the school district could do to prevent others from dropping out,” says Coleman. “He is a ‘gentle warrior’ on behalf of students who may not otherwise have their voices heard and he has compassion and genuine sincerity,” she notes.

Recipients for the Community Recognition Award are chosen based on their dedication to education, particularly adult education and literacy. Past recipients include (the late) Dr. Scott Loe, Ralph's Books and Blue Heron Books, Natrona County Detention Center, Casper Workforce Center, and Natrona County Republican Women, according to Coleman.

 

Monday, April 23, 2007
UWCC STUDENTS HONORED AT LUNCHEON

Ten students from the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center were honored at a recent luncheon for their academic achievements and community service. As recipients of the Myra Fox Skelton Foundation scholarships, the students expressed their gratitude to the Foundation for allowing them to complete their education while participating in their children’s lives and serving their community.

Funds are awarded annually to single parents who achieve academic success at the UW/CC Center and participate in community service activities. The monthly stipends allowed students to reduce workloads, giving them time to study and spend with their children.

Myra Fox Skelton, the benefactor of the funds, dedicated her life to church, education, and charity. She was elected superintendent of schools in Hot Springs County at age 23 – the youngest person to ever hold that office in Wyoming. Upon her death in 1986, Skelton’s estate was entrusted to the Foundation for annual distribution toward the causes to which she felt endeared, said Donald Chapin, a Myra Fox Skelton Foundation trustee.

The 2006 – 2007 Myra Fox Skelton scholars are: biology major Cheryl Mandich of Casper; secondary science education/biology major Kelly Keenan of Avinger, Texas; secondary science education major Kayci Stripling of Casper; elementary education majors Julie Slate, Megan Bickling, and Andra Arnold of Casper; psychology majors Angela Fankhauser of Casper and Amanda Annis of Glenrock; and social work majors Roberta Boren and Elizabeth Restad of Casper.

 

Friday, April 20, 2007
AUDITIONS TO BE HELD FOR BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

The Casper College Department of Theatre and Dance will be holding auditions for the college’s summer musical: “Disney’s Beauty and the Beast.”

The musical calls for a cast of 16 men and 15 women ages 15 through 60. There is one role for a boy, age 7 to 11 to play the part of “Chip” the small chipped teacup. “This is a wonderful family musical full of marvelous songs,” says director Tom Empey. “I am hoping that a large number of community members will come and audition for a role in this production.”

Those auditioning are asked to bring 16 to 24 measures of a song that will show the individual’s vocal range. The college will provide an accompanist.

Based on the Academy Award winning animated film, “Disney’s Beauty and the Beast” includes all of the marvelous songs from the film as well as several new songs. “This musical has such a good score,” notes Empey.

“Disney’s Beauty and the Beast” tells the story of a young woman, Belle, who discovers that her father is being held captive in an old castle by a beast. Belle trades her freedom for her father’s and during her time of captivity eventually tames the beast.

Auditions will be held on Saturday, April 28 from 2:30 to 5 p.m. and on Sunday, April 29 from 4 to 6 p.m. Appointments to audition can be made by calling the theatre at 268-2365. Callbacks will be held on Monday, May 7 at 7 p.m.

Top“Beauty and the Beast” will play on the McMurry Main Stage in the Gertrude Krampert Theatre July 13 and 14, 17 through 21 and 24 through 28 each night at 7:30 p.m.

 

Thursday, April 19, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE STUDENT RECEIVES NATIONAL RECOGNITION

Sarah Read, Cheyenne Central High School graduate and Casper College sophomore communications major, has been chosen and recognized as a “2007 New Century Scholar.”

The highest scoring student in each state in the All-USA Academic Team competition was named a New Century Scholar and received a $2,000 scholarship funded by the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation.

Read was flown to Tampa, Fla. late last week where she participated in the 2007 American Association of Community Colleges convention. All 50 winners of the New Century Scholar were honored during a reception attended by community college presidents and officials from throughout the United States.

The daughter of David and Janice Read of Cheyenne, Wyo., Read is a member of the international honor society Phi Theta Kappa and will graduate from Casper College in May with her associate of arts degree in human communications.

The New Century Scholar Program is sponsored by the American Association of Community Colleges, the Coca-Cola Foundation, the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation, and Phi Theta Kappa.

 

Wednesday, April 18, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE BUSY WITH EVOLUTION, DANCE AND COMEDY

Casper College will be busy for the next several days with a discussion on evolution in the classroom, a dance concert that looks at relationships, and a night of sharp-edged comedy.

As part of the Zimmerman Lecture Series, Kefyn Catley will present “Understanding Evolution: A View from the Classroom” on Thursday, April 19 at 7 p.m. in the Wheeler Auditorium located in the Wold Physical Science Center.

Catley is an Assistant Professor of Science Education at Peabody College, Vanderbilt University and of Biology in the Department of Biological Sciences. “My research revolves around the difficulties of understanding evolution and how these difficulties interact with peoples' perceptions of the natural world,” says Catley.

Catley’s presentation is free and open to the public.

Running through Sunday, April 22 is the annual spring dance concert. This year’s concert is entitled “Entrechat” and revolves around relationships throughout everyone’s lives. “In this concert I have tried to show these evolving relationships in ways that hopefully we all can relate to in some way. The concert starts with a group of 10 year olds on a playground and continues to move through their lives,” says Jodi Youmans-Jones, who conceived and choreographed the concert.

The concert will begin each night at 7:30 p.m. through Saturday, April 21 and includes a matinee on Sunday, April 22 at 4 p.m. The concert will take place in the Scifers Dance Performance Theatre in the Gertrude Krampert Theatre Complex. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for students 5 to 18. For tickets contact the box office at 268-2500.

Finally the campus will be filled with comedy on the night of Friday, April 20 when comedian Rachel Feinstein takes the stage at Durham Hall located in the Aley Fine Arts Center.

“Feinstein’s comedy is edgy, smart and will leave you laughing hours after she has left the stage,” notes her booking company Bass/Schuler Entertainment. “We think that she will not only appeal to our students, but to the community as well,” adds Jamie Demmitt, student activities coordinator at Casper College.

According to Bass/Schuler Feinstein is the NEW GENERATION of Comedy Central and has been featured on “Insomniac,” “Premium Blend,” “Fresh Faces of Comedy,” and on Court TV’s “Parco PI.”

Rachel Feinstein’s appearance at the college is being sponsored by the Casper College Student Activities Board and is free and open to the public.

 

Thursday, April 12, 2007
GARNETT PRESENTS WORLD MUSICAL COMMUNITIES AT FREE EVENT

Rod Garnett, professor of music at the University of Wyoming in Laramie, will be the honored speaker for this year’s President’s Speaker Series, hosted by the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center at the UW Outreach Building (951 N. Poplar) on April 26 at 7 p.m.

The presentation, in which Garnett incorporates three world communities — the Peruvian altiplano, the Celtic regions of Western Europe and Eastern Canada and the island of Bali, Indonesia — will include musical examples from each region. Entertaining and educational, Garnett’s address will include a performance of Irish traditional music on a wooden 19th century flute, Peruvian panpipes, and a Balinese gamelan instrument, which is bright red and gold, and played like a xylophone.

After his nomination by previous nominees, Garnett was selected to give the presentation by UW President Tom Buchanan. His selection was based on the important, well-rounded contributions to the university’s national standing, said the UW Office of Research.

TopFor more information, contact the UW/CC Center at 268-2713.

 

Wednesday, April 11, 2007
GLENROCK ALL STATER SIGNS WITH LADY T-BIRDS

Josie Stewart, who led Wyoming high school girls basketball in scoring this past season, signed a national junior college letter of intent Tuesday to play for Casper College.

Stewart averaged 21 points and 9 rebounds in leading Glenrock High School to 16 wins and a second place finish in East 3A conference play this year. The 5-9 guard also helped lead Glenrock to a third place finish at the state tournament her junior season. It was Glenrock’s first appearance at state in girls’ basketball.

“She made women's basketball important in Glenrock,” said Tony Lehner, her high school coach. “She turned our program around. She has set the bar pretty high for our young girls coming up.”

Lehner said Stewart chose Casper College because of the level of play and because it is close to home. “We are excited about that because our kids and our fans can get over there to see her play,” he said.

Stewart will be reunited in the T-Bird backcourt with Kelly Fargen, another Herder who will be a CC sophomore next season.

Casper College coach Angelo Hill expects Stewart to have immediate impact for the Thunderbirds. She will be counted on to pick up some of the scoring void left by the departure of seven sophomores. “ We are excited that she will be able to play her natural position at guard,” Hill said. “(Josie) is a tremendously hard worker, with a great work ethic at both ends of the floor. More important, she is a great person. She will be an asset to us on and off the court.”

Hill guided the T-Birds to 26 wins and a national tournament appearance this season and was named Region IX Coach of the Year in March.

 

Friday, April 6, 2007
GED CENTER SEEKS GRADUATES

The Casper College ABE (Adult Basic Education)/GED Center is seeking those eligible to march at this year’s GED graduation ceremony.“ There are approximately 175 graduates eligible to participate in the ceremony,” says Kelsee Miller, ABE/GED instructor.

According to Miller, graduates may pick up their caps, gowns and graduation announcements beginning April 30.
This year’s graduation ceremony is scheduled for Saturday, May 19 at 2 p.m. in the ‘Swede’ Erickson Thunderbird Gym. It is free and open to the public.

Anyone who has graduated from the ABE/GED Center within the last year should contact Miller at 268-2230.

 

Friday, April 6, 2007
COMEDY HYPNOTIST FREDERICK WINTERS RETURNS TO CASPER COLLEGE

Back by popular demand, comedy hypnotist Frederick Winters will return to Casper College on Friday, April 13 for another show of comedy hypnosis.

“We keep bringing Frederick back to Casper College because the students just love him,” says Jamie Demmitt, student activities coordinator. In addition to his popularity with the students, Winters has also developed a strong following within the community.

Winters is a certified hynotherapist and one of the busiest performing hypnotists in the United States. Winters changes his show each year “so the students are always fired up,” according to Bass/Schuler Entertainment. Demmitt agrees adding, “Frederick has a great show that always entertains everyone in the house.”

Winters will perform in the Roberts Commons Ballroom beginning at 7 p.m. The show is free and open to the public.

 

Friday, April 6, 2007
SCOTS POET LUMSDEN TO VISIT CASPER

Award-winning Scots poet Roddy Lumsden will perform a poetry reading on Saturday, April 14 at 4 p.m. at the Casper College Administration Building Room 198.

Sponsored by the Visiting Writers Series of the University of Wyoming’s fine arts master’s degree program, Lumsden will be joined by Craig Arnold, assistant professor of English at the University of Wyoming and Tom Rea, Casper author, who will lead a post-reading discussion.

Lumsden has published four books of poetry, including “Yeah Yeah Yeah,” “The Book of Love, which was short-listed for Britain’s prestigious T.S. Eliot Prize, “Roddy Lumsden is Dead,” and most recently “Mischief Night – New & Selected Poems.”

Originally from St. Andrews, Scotland, Lumsden now lives in London, where he teaches at City University and other colleges. A popular performer of his work, he has read widely in the United Kingdom and the United States, as well as in Sweden, Ireland and the Philippines.

Lumsden’s poems are chronicles of longing and heartbreak, booze and the blues. As erudite as they are hip, their humor is shot through with surprising touches of tenderness and sensuality. In the words of one reviewer, “they would be better shouted across a crowded pub, or gasped out in a motel room, or recited drunkenly at funerals and christenings.” A longtime aficionado of rock music, he has also served as poet-in-residence to the music industry.
Lumsden once made a living of sorts playing quiz machines in Edinburgh, and he works as a puzzle writer for British Broadcasting Company’s MindGames magazine.  His book “Vitamin Q” — and its related blog, “Vitamin P” — is “a temple of trivia lists and curious words,” and shows his vast knowledge of the delightful quirks and oddities of language and popular culture.

The event is free and open to the public. It is co-sponsored by the University of Wyoming/Casper College Center, Casper College and the Casper College Literary Committee.

For more information, visit the following Web sites:
www.uwyo.edu/creativewriting
Topwww.bloodaxebooks.com/personpage.asp?author=Roddy+Lumsden
http://www.vitaminq.blogspot.com/

 

Thursday, April 5, 2007
T-BIRDS HOST 52ND ANNUAL ROPIN’ AND RIGGIN’ DAYS
CC teams hoping for home Arena advantage

Fifty-two years ago, Dale Stiles decided that Casper College should host a rodeo.

No two-year college had ever done that, but Stiles knew what he was doing and a half century later cowboys and cowgirls from throughout the Rocky Mountain Region still converge on Casper for the Ropin’ and Riggin’ Days Rodeo.
Now named in Stiles’ honor, this year’s event runs April 13-15 at the Central Wyoming Fairgrounds Arena building. Performances are slated for 7 p.m. Friday, 1 and 7 p.m. Saturday and noon Sunday. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for students.

Hank Franzen and Jim Johnstone, two of Stiles’ former cowboys, will be providing the stock, and local announcer J.W. Kinder will be behind the microphone.

Saturday night’s performance will feature the now popular “Wild Ride” event. Every team picks a representative, who is judged not only on his ability to ride a bucking horse, but also on dramatics and showmanship.

CC rodeo coach Tom Parker says his team is always excited about “coming home” for their rodeo. The T-Birds spend the rest of the season – 11 rodeos in all – on the road during the fall and spring. “It means a lot for the kids to come home and perform in front of their friends and family,” Parker says.

Parker is hoping the home arena advantage will help his contestants. Jake Hamilton had a solid fourth place finish in the calf roping at Colorado State last weekend, and has moved into contention in the tie down roping. O.J. Huxtable (Douglas) ranked eighth in the steer wrestling going into the spring half of the season, but has slipped out of the top 10.

Four of Parker’s cowgirls are in contention to finish in the top three by season’s end but have yet to put together a strong rodeo collectively. Katie Felix (Lander) and Kylee Rinehart (Highmore, S.D.) are in the top 10 in the breakaway roping; Clarissa Tavenner (Idaho) and Carla Weiser are also among the top 10 in the barrel racing. As a team, Casper’s women’s team stands fifth in the region, still within striking distance of the ultimate prize.

The top two teams and the top three individuals in each event at the end of the season qualify for the College National Finals the second week in June at the Casper Events Center.

 

Tuesday, April 3, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE CLASS NEEDS HORSES

Horses needing to have their hoofs shod or trimmed are needed by the Casper College Agriculture Department for its spring horseshoeing class.

The class, which will be held through Thursday, April 12 will run from 6 to 10 p.m., Monday through Thursday, according to Tom Parker, agriculture instructor.
Taught in the Werner Ag Pavilion on the Casper College campus, the class will need three to four horses to shoe or trim each night.

Parker says owners will be charged only for the materials used on each horse. "It's good timing for those wanting to get their horses shod or trimmed up for the summer," he says.

TopAnyone interested in providing horses for the class should call Parker at 268-2262.

Thursday, May 24, 2007
ABE/GED ANNOUNCE SUMMER HOURS

Summer hours are now available to those wishing to work on their GED or gain some Adult Basic Education (ABE) skills this summer.

Hours for the Casper College ABE/GED Center, located in the Werner Technical Center on the college campus, are Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Hours for the Casper Workforce Center, located at 851 Werner Court, Suite 121, are Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For more information, contact the ABE/GED Center at 268-2230.

 

Friday, May 18, 2007
ANDERSON SELECTED AS OUTSTANDING ADMINISTRATOR

Kevin Anderson, western history specialist and certified archivist at Casper College, has been selected as the 2007 recipient of the Casper College Outstanding Administrator Award.

The award honors a Casper College administrator and is based on service to the community and Casper College.

Anderson began at Casper College in August 1987. Anderson, “is known for his great passion for the study and preservation of history, particularly history of the western United States,” says Todd Wykert, director of media services at the college. “He was one of the early adopters and proficient users of computers at Casper College, and continues to keep up with the latest uses of technology in his job.”

“Kevin is a great ambassador and resource for the college, giving presentations throughout the year to different groups,” notes Wykert.

“His passion for his work, his interest in people and their stories, his keen intellect and curiosity, his dedication and hard work, have greatly benefited those he has served as well as this institution,” says Wykert.

Each year all Casper College employees are asked to submit the names of those they wish to nominate for the award. Each nominee must then submit a detailed packet of information to a committee to be considered. The committee is composed of administrators who make the final decision for the award.

 

Thursday, May 17, 2007
GED GRADUATE AND NEUROLOGIST TO SPEAK AT GED CEREMONIES

Casper neurologist David B. Wheeler will be the keynote speaker at the 2007 GED graduation ceremony at Casper College on Saturday, May 19 at the “Swede” Erickson Thunderbird Gymnasium.

According to Kelsee Miller, ABE/GED instructor, Wheeler “dropped out of high school on his 16th birthday and within two months was living in an apartment with some older friends. He worked as a dishwasher then cook for three years before meeting his future wife. She was starting college and her excitement about learning and education was infectious. A year later he obtained his GED then took the ACT.”

Wheeler went on to earn a B.A. in zoology from the University of Montana, a M.Sc. in physiology from the University of Oxford, and a M.D and Ph.D. in neurosciences from Stanford University School of Medicine. Following his internship and residency, Wheeler “went on to acquire special training in the diagnosis and treatment of seizures and epilepsy while completing a fellowship in clinical neurophysiology at Brigham & Women’s Hospital

“Dr. Wheeler is an inspiration to every GED graduate and has a terrific story to tell,” says Miller. Currently Wheeler is in private practice at Wyoming Neurologic Associates in Casper and serves as the Medical Director for the Stroke and Epilepsy programs at Wyoming Medical Center.

According to Miller, approximately 80 graduates will walk at the ceremony, which is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the ceremony.

 

 

Wednesday, May 16, 2007
VERITAS HONORS INSTITUTE TO BEGIN FALL 2007

Beginning this fall a new program at Casper College will challenge exceptionally talented and motivated students.

Honors InstituteLed by Casper College history instructor Dr. Everett Akam the Veritas Honors Institute is designed to challenge the exceptionally talented and motivated student. “These students will have a sense of community and identity and that they belong to a program while they engage in courses that will give them the background to excel when they transfer to four-year schools and universities,” says Akam.

The Veritas Honors Institute will feature a rigorous academic program, special classes and at least four seminar classes. “The seminar classes will feature timely and relevant topics such as the quest for American identity, the history of totalitarianism and bioethics,” Akam says. Each seminar will be taught by “exceptionally well trained teacher/scholars who love both learning and teaching equally – providing an entirely unique experience for students,” he notes.

Veritas members will participate in field trips to cultural events, conference attendance, informal social gatherings, and fun outdoor activities, “Trips and excursions will be part of the program and will be at no cost to the student,” Akam notes.

Some of the other benefits of the Veritas Honors Institute include increased financial aid of up to $2,000 per year plus Hathaway scholarships for qualifying students, automatic acceptance and transfer to many honors programs in outstanding regional four-year colleges and universities, and special honors designation on transcripts and diplomas. According to Akam the program is limited to 20 students.

According to Akam, the Veritas Honors Institute was named “Veritas” “because I wanted our honors program to distinguish itself from other similar programs in the minds of students, and Veritas in particular because Veritas means truth in Latin. Thus the word connotes the spirit of our program, which is the search for truth first and foremost. The Latin origin also points toward the rich history and tradition of Western civilization.”

To qualify for the Veritas Honors Institute students must have a high school GPA of 3.5 or higher, a composite ACT score of 24 or higher (or SAT of 1200 or higher), or a letter of recommendation from an instructor familiar with the student’s work and promise.

TopFor more information call Casper College at 268-2100, toll free at 800-442-2963 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Wednesday, May 16, 2007
RECEPTION HONORS UW/CC EDUCATION GRADUATES

Forty-two graduates who have earned education degrees through the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center were honored recently at a pinning ceremony and reception.

Kay Persichitte, director of the College of Education’s Office of Teacher Education in Laramie, congratulated the degree candidates and noted the important work that each new teacher will face.

“As an elementary school teacher, you will reach more than 1,000 students throughout a 30-year career,” said Persichitte. “As a secondary school teacher, you will reach more than 4,500 students.”

After remarks from Jamie Steever, recipient of the 2006 Sue Jorgensen Excellent Student in Education award, and Jeff Pebbles, recipient of the same award in 2007, the education graduates and their mentors were called to the podium to receive their pins.

Following are the graduates who earned their elementary education pins, along with the school where they performed their residency:

Fort Caspar Academy: Marilyn Barella and Jerrie Ferguson; Mills Elementary: Brenda Tucker; Paradise Valley Elementary: Charlotte Benardis, Erin McColley, Dawn McGeowan, Nedra Parrott, Steever, Gretchen Taylor, Carolyn Ashburn, Jessica Christensen, Valerie Lane, and Staci Swenson; Crest Hill Elementary: Catherine Deleeuw, Erin Olson, Tera Petersen, Julie Slate, and Michael Zechiel; Manor Heights Elementary: Megan Bickling, Maria Clements, Jolyn Hallgren, Albert “Buddy” Johnson, Christy Keele, Anna Lavin, and Pebbles; McKinley Elementary: Craig McDaniel, Bridgette Schwindt, Kristi Stringham; North Casper Elementary: Kolleen Buckallew and Stephanie Kinsel; Woods Learning Center: Kendra Bauer.

Following are the graduates who earned their elementary education pins and will continue in a special education master’s program, along with the school where they performed their residency:

Bar Nunn Elementary: Rainey Auen; Evansville Elementary: Dirk Andrews, Michael Botkin, Tennille Grosz, and Ronald Hall; Mills Elementary: Amber Monroe and Linda Willoughby; Pineview Elementary: Barbara Balerio and Theresa Boomer; Poison Spider Elementary: Valeri Hudson and Lynn Jones.

John Kambutu, assistant professor of educational studies at the UW/CC Center, closed the program with inspiring remarks, telling the graduates to instill in their students that “life is good,” and urging them to ignite the spark of curiosity and passion in their students’ learning – to “go light their candles.”

 

Wednesday, May 16, 2007
FRANKLAND HONORED WITH SCULLY AWARD

Tammy Frankland, Casper College English instructor and language and literature department chair, was honored recently with the Judith Bailey Scully award.

The yearly award, established by Marlan O. Scully in honor of his wife Judith, was designed “... to honor faculty who demonstrate academic excellence as characterized by Judith’s outstanding accomplishments as a Casper College and University of Wyoming student,” says Scully.

Frankland began teaching as an adjunct at the college for the spring 1999 semester in the English department. She was hired full-time starting with the fall 1999 semester and “began teaching with a focus on the developmental studies students in the English Department. She knows exactly what it takes to help these students become successful. She mentored them, and focused on the whole student,” says Carmen Simone, vice president for academic affairs.

“After a few years, she moved into teaching English composition and later became English department head. She and Bob Kleinschmidt (Casper College woodwind instructor) were deeply involved in organizing the first Leadership Institute at Casper College. This is Tammy’s first year as Language and Literature division chair,” adds Simone.

“I continue to be impressed by her dedication to students, her professionalism, and her ability to listen and really hear,” says Simone.

“This award is good for the Casper College faculty in general, because it recognizes the excellence we have in our faculty,” Simone adds.

According to Paul Hallock, director of the Casper College Foundation, the selection committee chose Tammy because of her “excellence in teaching and her availability to students, her willingness to participate on committees at the college and her involvement in both the college and community.”

Frankland received her B.A. in English and psychology from the University of Rochester, her M.A. in English literature from the University of Oklahoma and is currently pursuing her doctorate in community college leadership from Colorado State University.

In addition to the Scully, Frankland has been recognized twice with a Barbara Raymond Scifers Faculty Scholarship available to female faculty at Casper College who are pursuing their doctorate award.
Previous Judith Bailey Scully award recipients include Jodi-Youmans Jones, Casper College dance instructor, in 2005 and Mickie Goodro, Casper College mathematics instructor, in 2006.

Bailey Scully won honors while attending Casper College and took her degree from the University of Wyoming only three years after graduating from Natrona County High School. She then went on to quickly win accreditation in the prestigious New York TopSchool System. Bailey Scully is the daughter of Jim and Audrey Bailey of Casper, and the niece of Walter Bailey, a founding father of Casper College.

 

Tuesday, May 15, 2007
JUDGE DOWNES TO ADDRESS CASPER COLLEGE GRADUATES

William F. Downes, Chief United States District Judge for the District of Wyoming, will be the speaker at the 2007 Casper College Commencement Ceremony on Friday, May 18 beginning at 7 p.m.

Judge Downes will present his address to more than 240 Casper College graduates who will participate in the ceremony.

A Boston native, Judge Downes was in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1968 until 1971. He served in Vietnam as an Artillery Officer in the 11th Marines and as a forward observer for the 5th Marine (infantry) Regiment.

Judge Downes came to Wyoming in 1975, shortly after earning his J.D. from the University of Houston Law Center. He previously received a B.A. from the University of North Texas. He was an associate and partner in the Green River Law firm of Clark and Downes until 1978, when he became an associate and partner in the firm of Brown and Drew. He remained in that role until 1994, when he entered into duty as a U.S. district judge. He was elevated to his current role as Chief Judge of the District of Wyoming on July 1, 1999.

As many as 538 students could receive 570 associate degrees for the spring semester, according to Lynn Fletcher, registrar. Of those students, 67 percent are female and the average age is 27.5 years. Students are not required to participate in the commencement ceremony.

Eric Unruh, division chair of the Casper College Fine Arts Division and piano instructor, will perform the preludes and the processional.

The ceremony is free and open to all and will take place at the Casper Events Center.

 

Tuesday, May 15, 2007
TWO CASPER COLLEGE FACULTY PRESENTED ROSENTHAL AWARDS

William ‘Bill’ Mixer and Anne Rognstad were the winners of Casper College’s Rosenthal Outstanding Faculty Awards for 2007.

Begun in 1987 with a grant provided by Casper resident Jack Rosenthal, two $2500 awards are given to faculty each year.

Mixer, director of the Casper College Environmental Training and Resource Center, began at Casper College January 12, 1983. “Bill developed the water quality program all by himself starting with several classes. The program went from a certificate program to a degree program. Now two degrees exist: water quality and environmental science,” says Mixer’s colleague Megan Graham.

Courses for both programs are offered in the classroom and on the Internet. “His program keeps evolving with the technology of the field and the needs of his students. He still runs classes that are not in a degree program, but are important, including OSHA and fly-fishing classes,” says Graham, electronics instructor at the college. “ Bill is first class in everything he does,” adds Graham, who presented Mixer with his award.

Rognstad, English and reading instructor and director of the Casper College Learning Community Program, began at Casper College on January 2, 1995. “I have known and worked with Anne for over the last 10 years in her position as my former supervisor, as a wonderful colleague, and as a dear friend,” says Karen Moenkhaus, who presented Rognstad with her award.

According to Moenkhaus, Casper College English Lab director, Rognstad has served as the chair of the Demorest Humanities Festival Committee for the past seven years and been co-director for five of the Humanities Festivals and Demorest Lectures Series. She has served on the International Students Advisory Board from its inception in 1998, and last spring Rognstad was asked to be the coordinator for the new Learning Communities Program.

“Anne truly believes that learning should be enjoyable and teaching creative. I think a true testament to Anne’s teaching is reflected in one student’s evaluation who said, ‘I would not have stayed in school without Anne’s support,’” says Moenkhaus.

Each year all Casper College employees are asked to submit the names of those they wish to nominate for the Rosenthal Award. Each nominee must then submit a detailed packet of information to his or her respective committee to be considered. A faculty committee makes the final decision for the two faculty awards.

The award is based on the quality of the packet submitted as well as service to the community and Casper College.

 

Tuesday, May 8, 2007
TWO RECITALS SET FEATURING TALENTED SINGERS

Two recitals will be held at Casper College featuring the voice students of Jean Marie Tichenor, vocal instructor and music department chair at Casper College.

The first recital, scheduled for Friday, May 11 at 7 p.m. will feature 11 of Tichenor’s students performing a variety of vocal selections. “This recital will cover the gamut of classical vocal styles from art song and opera to Broadway’s ‘Jekyll and Hyde,’” says Tichenor.

The variety of songs will include “selections from the Italian baroque period, Richard Strauss, Gabriel Faure, Stephanbo Donaudy, G.F. Handel and others. The recital will also include a bass aria from Mozart’s ‘Magic Flute,’” Tichenor says.

Students participating in the recital include: Andrea Hampson, Tongue River; Sherri Bertagnole, Wright; Andrew Smyth, Lusk; Brooke Shafer, Rawlins; Dan Bleak, Thermopolis; Jessica Brooks, Gillette; Branden Martinez, Worland; Paula Flynn, Glenrock; Anthony Stengel and Shereen Mosier, Casper, and Kiersten Smothermon, Billings, Mont.

The second recital on Saturday, May 12 will begin at 3 p.m. and will feature sophomore music performance majors Katie Long and Chris Riedl both of Casper. “Both Katie and Chris are outstanding and intend to pursue music careers in Nashville, Tenn. beginning this fall,” notes Tichenor.

“Katie is a mezzo soprano and will sing a variety of songs in English such as ‘The 23rd Psalm’ by Malotte, who also composed the famous ‘Lord’s Prayer’ and two songs by American composer Thomas Pasatieri. Other selections include several opera pieces including one from the baroque opera ‘Ginevra’ by Donmenico Sarri, the famous ‘Sequidille' from the opera ‘Carmen’ by Georges Bizet, and ‘The Song to the Moon’ from ‘Rusalka’ by Antonin Dvorak, which Katie will sing in Czechoslovakian,” says Tichenor.

“Chris will sing English selections by British composers Ivor Gurney and Ralph Vaughan-Williams and by American Paul Bowles. He will sing a Schubert art song and several operatic arias: ‘Si tra i ceppi’ from ‘Berenice’ by G.F. Handel, an aria from ‘The Magic Flute’ my Mozart and an aria from Gharles Gounod's opera ‘Faust.’ The recital will end with a comic duet from ‘The Magic Flute,’” Tichenor says.

Beverly Lorimer will be the accompanist for both recitals and both will be held in TopDurham Hall, located in the Aley Fine Arts Center. The recitals are free and open to the public.

 

Tuesday, May 8, 2007
CONCERT AND SIGHT SESSION SET FOR FRIDAY

Durham Hall will be filled with music on Friday, May 11 beginning at 4:30 p.m. with the Natrona County High School Band, members of the Kelly Walsh High School Band, the Casper College Jazz Ensemble and the Casper College Collaborative Sight Band.

“This will be a great concert featuring commercial, dance, jazz and big band music,” says Robert Kleinschmidt, Casper College woodwind instructor.

Following the performance, everyone is welcome to join in and play music. “We are encouraging everyone to bring their instruments with them and join us after the concert to play. The college is looking to form a group of musicians who want to get together on a regular basis and play music by sight,” says Kleinschmidt. “We plan to play until about 6:45 p.m. and we are inviting all ability levels to join us,” he adds.

According to Kleinschmidt, the idea behind the concert and the open band session that will follow is to let the public know that Casper College is a “place where music happens” and is a “center of musical activity.”

Durham Hall is located in the Aley Fine Arts Center. The concert and open session are free and open to all.

 

Tuesday, May 8, 2007
FILM FESTIVAL PRESENTS LOOKS AT HISPANICS IN WYOMING
The Casper College Multicultural Film Festival will present its second film for the semester, “Resettling the West” on Friday, May 11 at 7 p.m. in the Wheeler Auditorium located in the Wold Physical Science Center.

According to film festival director Erich Frankland, “Resettling the West” looks at “the community impact of new immigrants coming into Wyoming, focusing primarily on Mexican and Hispanic immigrants.”

The film ties in with the festival’s theme this year: “Hispanic Perspectives.” “A big aspect of this film is how communities adjust to the influx of these immigrants – schools, neighborhoods and the workforce. Not only is this an important topic for Wyoming, but also the American West, which is seeing a large flow of immigration problems relating to ‘how should we assimilate these immigrants into current values,’” says Frankland.

“This film in particular shows that this issue is something that the state of Wyoming has not given very much thought to,” Frankland notes.

Following the film, a discussion will be led by Chad Hanson, Casper College sociology instructor and Martha C. Montez, a Casper College student.

The film is free and open to all.

 

Tuesday, May 8, 2007
COLLEGE HOSTS SECURITY SESSION ON FRIDAY

“Classroom and Campus Personal Security” a training and discussion session will be held at Casper College on Friday, May 11 in the Myra Fox Skelton Energy Institute, Room 100.

Led by Mark Robinson, Casper College campus security director, the session will allow attendees to participate in a question and answer session regarding campus security issues.

“There are a lot of people who are wondering what can be done or what should be done in regard to security on a college campus in light of the incident several weeks ago at Virginia Tech,” says Robinson.

“We will try to look at several topics, including the role of the college and what an individual can do in potentially dangerous situations on campus. There are a lot of things that we can and can’t do as individuals, but I hope to shed some light on what we can do in a crisis situation,” Robinson says.

The training and discussion session is free and open to the public and will run from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

 

Tuesday, May 8, 2007
PEBBLES RECEIVES EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION AWARD AT CEREMONY

Jeff Pebbles, a senior in the elementary education bachelor’s degree program at the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center, received the Sue Jorgensen Excellent Student in Education award at a recent ceremony. He became the 11th recipient of the prestigious award, recognized as one of the center’s highest honors bestowed upon prospective teachers.

To receive this honor, a candidate must earn a minimum 3.5 grade point average while enrolled in the elementary education degree program at the UW/CC Center, exhibit professional disposition toward mentors and peers, contribute to the education field through leadership and community service, and display a positive attitude to promote excitement and curiosity about learning. Based on these criteria, candidates are nominated and selected by the elementary education faculty and staff.

At the ceremony, John Jorgensen presented the award, following a brief description of Sue Jorgensen, his late wife, and her dedication to education. She was the first coordinator of the teacher education program at the UW/CC Center.  Donn McCall, chairperson of the Central Wyoming Board of Cooperative Educational Services, which matches the Jorgensen Award, also spoke briefly about Sue Jorgensen and her legacy.

Brent Pickett, associate dean and director of the UW/CC Center, then honored Pebbles with a plaque that will hang in the center’s main office, featuring the names of all recipients of the award.

“Sue Jorgensen was instrumental to the creation of the elementary education program run through UW/CC. She had high standards and we continue to work diligently to live up to the great example that she set,” said Pickett. “I feel privileged that we continue to have the support of the Jorgensen family today and that the education students that we graduate every year embody academic rigor and excitement about learning.”

TopPebbles will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education in May.

 

Monday, May 7, 2007
COLLEGE CONCERT CELEBRATES CINCO DE MAYO, JOHN WAYNE AND MORE

Concert rescheduled due to Saturday storm
The Casper College Concert Band has rescheduled its May 5 concert, which was snowed out, for this Saturday, May 12 at 5:30 p.m. in Durham Hall, located in the Aley Fine Arts Center.

According to Doug Bull, concert director, the concert “will feature the Casper College Brass Ensemble with a reference to Cinco de Mayo, while the College Concert Band will perform the ‘Light Cavalry Overture,’ the ‘American Folk Rhapsody No. 3,’ and the ‘Poet and Peasant Overture.’”

The concert band will also “commemorate John Wayne's 100th birthday with ‘The Cowboys,’ the opening of the third ‘Pirates of the Caribbean,’ and delve into American music history with ‘Lawrence Milk Plays Guy Lumbago.’ It should prove to be an enjoyable evening,” says Bull.

The concert is free and open to all.

 

Friday, May 4, 2007
PATTON OFFERS ”WORLD” OF MUSIC IN SUNDAY CONCERT

Casper College voice and choir instructor, Patrick Patton, will lead the Casper College choirs in a concert entitled: “Music of the World” on Sunday, May 6.

“The concert features each choir singing in a variety of languages and styles,” says Patton. According to Patton, the Collegiate Chorale will perform music in Yiddish, selections from Spain, Kenya, Venezuela, and a piece from the American Spiritual repertoire.

The Casper College Women’s Choir will sing two “’Mouth Music’” selections – music using their voices like instrument – one called ‘Reel a Bouche,’ and another that features a type of ‘tribal’ sound called ‘Adiemus,’ says Patton. The group will also sing music from France and the Caribbean.

The Casper College Men’s Choir has gained a reputation for comedy, and concertgoers will not be disappointed as the group “will perform a spoof on music history that features a walk through time on the theme ‘Mary Had a Little Lamb.’ In addition, they will sing selections from Ireland, the Hebrew tradition, as well as a tune by the Beach Boys featuring our own American Pop Culture,” notes Patton.

The college’s vocal jazz group, the Contemporary Singers, will perform music from the American Jazz repertoire they recently presented at the Greeley Jazz Festival in Greeley, Colo.

The concert will begin at 2 p.m. at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church and is free and open to the public. According to Patton, a free-will offering will be taken, with the proceeds going to help “defray costs of events throughout the year,” says Patton.

 

Thursday, May 3, 2007
RECEPTION AND Q & A TO FOLLOW OPENING NIGHT PERFORMANCE

Casper theatergoers who attend the opening night performance of Casper College’s production of “Flight” on Friday, May 4 are invited to attend a reception and question and answer session with the play’s author, Arthur Giron following the presentation.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for the audience members to visit with Arthur and the cast following the play. They will be able to talk and participate in a question and answer session with all those involved in this production and enjoy refreshments at the reception,” says Richard Burk, director.

Both the reception and question and answer session are free and open to the public.

“Flight” will also run on Saturday, May 5 and continue the following week from May 8 through May 12, beginning each night at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for students ages 5 to 18 and are available at the Krampert Theatre box office (open 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday), by calling 268-2500, by logging on to www.caspercollege.edu, or one hour before show time for that show only.

 

Wednesday, May 2, 2007
TWO MORE T-BIRDS SIGN DIVISION I; POKORNY SIGNS WITH REGIS

Two more players off the Region IX champion Casper College women’s basketball team have signed to play Division I basketball, the college announced.

Kylie Rinehart, the two-sport star who returned after a season’s absence to play a pivotal role inside for the T-Birds, and Lizzie Cooper, the point guard on the team, have both inked letters of intent with the University of Northern Colorado.

Rinehart, from Highmore, S.D., also competes in rodeo for Casper College. But the 6-1 post player earned numerous looks at the national tournament, and earned the offer to play two more years of basketball for coach Jamie Wright.

Wright, a former assistant coach at the University of Wyoming, also convinced Cooper to come on board. The freshman from Gold Coast, Australia, started every game for the T-Birds until the Region IX tournament, when she was sidelined with a knee injury.

“Lizzie and I talked about the opportunity to play Division I basketball, which was her dream when she came over here,” CC coach Angelo Hill said. “It was too good an opportunity to pass up.”

Rinehart averaged eight points and six rebounds during the post season. Cooper averaged six points and four assists this past season. The T-Birds finished with a 26-9 record.

Casper College guard Andy Pokorny has signed a letter of intent with Regis College in Denver.

Pokorny earned All-Region IX honors after an outstanding sophomore season for coach Gary Becker’s T-Birds. The Laramie High School product averaged 9.5 points, 2.5 rebounds and shot 39 percent from beyond the three-point arc. He led the T-Birds in steals with 52 and shot 90 percent from the free throw line.

Pokorny had an outstanding Region IX tournament, helping lead the T-Birds to the championship game. The T-Birds posted the best turnaround season in the region, posting 20 wins under Becker after winning only 10 the year before.

Regis University plays in the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference.

 

Wednesday, May 2, 2007
SAMBA AND EGGS FEATURED AT PERCUSSION AND JAZZ CONCERT

The Casper College Percussion Ensemble and the Juju Jazz will be in concert on Thursday, May 3 at 7:30 p.m. in Durham Hall, located in the Aley Fine Arts Center.

According to Terry Gunderson, percussion ensemble director, the group will play a samba, Shostakovich, eggs and “the director’s cut, which expands to seven players for the taiko piece that premiered at the 2006 Casper College Madrigal Feast in December.”

TopThe concert is free and open to all.

 

Tuesday, May 1, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE LAUNCHES PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS SERIES

The Casper College Center for Training and Development has announced the first of two daylong events as part of its Professional Success Series.

“Mastering Personal Productivity – Moving at the Speed of Life” will be held on Friday, May 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Led by Laura Stack, president of The Productivity Pro, Inc, a personal productivity firm, the “course is designed for anyone who wants to learn how to leave the office earlier, with less stress, and more to show for it,” says Ann Dalton, Casper College Center for Training and Development specialist.

“This is not an old-school ‘time management’ class, but will offer participants a multitude of physiological, psychological, behavioral, and environmental productivity strategies,” Dalton says.

The one-day workshop is $159 per person and includes lunch.

Dr. Lynette Krenelka will present “Grant Writing: Getting the Results You Want” the second event in the series on both Wednesday, May 16 and Thursday, May 17, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. “We believe that many people will want to take advantage of this workshop so we are offering it on two different days,” says Dalton.

According to Dalton, attendees will “gain the skills and confidence necessary to successfully obtain grants by learning a proven method of grant writing designed to make fund-seeking efforts more successful.”

“Attendees will learn the four fundamental phases of grant writing – planning, identifying funding sources, developing a grant proposal, and follow-up steps. This workshop for novice grant writers is a systematic approach to grant writing for nonprofits and government organizations seeking grant funding,” notes Dalton.

A total of .7 continuing education units are available for this workshop, which costs $325 per person and includes lunch.

Space is limited for both events; so early registration is encouraged by calling Dalton at 268-2085 or logging onto www.caspercollege.edu/success.

 

Tuesday, May 1, 2007
UW/CC DONORS HONORED AT RECEPTION

Nearly two-dozen attendees gathered at a recent reception to recognize the generosity of various foundations, organizations and individuals who have made financial contributions to the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center.

Brent Pickett, associate dean and director of the UW/CC Center, presented awards to eight donors of student scholarships and 31 contributors of UW/CC student funds, offering “sincere appreciation for the generosity toward UW/CC Center students, who may otherwise not be able to continue their education,” said Pickett.

Donors of student scholarships honored at the reception were the Casper Star Tribune, Sue Jorgensen Memorial, McMurry Foundation, Myra Fox Skelton Foundation, Paul Stock Foundation, Rocky Mountain Power, Woodworker’s Supply, and Zimmerman Family Foundation.

Contributors to UW/CC Center student funds honored at the reception were Larry and Margo Bean, Jeff and Terrie Hockin, Kit and Sheridan Jennings, Pamela McMichael, Arthur and Joann Schubert, Corine Stark, Robert and Barbara Thurman, David and Mary Crum, Lorraine James, Byron and Candi Lane, Brent and Jeana Pickett, Scott and Diane Seville, Rod and Jill Thompson, Ronald Ampe, Cheryl Collums, Nick and Maggi Murdock, Susan Stanton, Gail Zimmerman, Sanford and Nanci Andrew, Bruce and Kathy Bummer, Cynthia Cottrell, Kim Lau, Bruce Richardson, Mick and Susie McMurry, Richard and Betty Mason, R. Stuart and Daney J. Tanner, the True TopFoundation, Mark and Nancy Doelger, Toby and Nancy Marlatt, Ambassador Thomas and Marta Stroock, and Bob and Carol Tarantola.

Friday, June 29, 2007
GARDEN GAIT 2007 TO BENEFIT TATE GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

The annual horticultural walk known as the Garden Gait, to benefit Casper College’s Tate Geological Museum, will be held on Wednesday, July 18.

The walk will include eight Casper area homes, which will feature a variety of beautiful gardens. Two tour times are scheduled, 9 a.m. to noon and again that same day from 4 to 7 p.m.

An ice cream social and wine and cheese tasting party will be part of this year’s event. “The ice cream social will take place at the Tate from 1 to 3 p.m. while the wine and cheese tasting party will begin at 7 p.m. at one of the tour homes,” says Marla Wold, Tate Advisory Committee member.

During the 7 p.m. event a drawing will be held for three prints. Raffle tickets for the drawing cost $1 each or six for $5 for a chance to win one of the prints. “The three prints that we will be raffling off include a garden scene by Jennifer Winship Mark, a depiction of both ancient and modern Casper showing mammoths and current diggers by Mike Kopriva, and ‘Dinosaur Hill” by Carol Swinney,” says Rachel Savage, coordinator of the Tate gift shop and exhibits and Garden Gait chair.

All proceeds raised from both the raffle and Garden Gait ticket sales will go into the Tate Endowment Fund and be matched by the state of Wyoming as part of the Community College Endowment Challenge Fund.

Tickets are $5 each or six for $25 and can be purchased at the Tate Geological Museum, The Flower Gallery, Blue Heron Books, Field’s Creek 104, The Herbadashery, Johnny Appleseed, Meadow Acres Greenhouse, Plant Station, and the Nicolaysen Art Museum.

For more information call the Tate at 268-2447 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Tuesday, June 26, 2007
DEAN’S HONOR ROLL ANNOUNCED

Casper College officials have released the names of students who made the Dean’s Honor Roll at Casper College for the 2007 spring semester. To qualify for the award, a student must have a semester grade point average of 3.5 or better. The recognition is for part-time degree seeking students (those taking six to 11 credit hours per semester) and nondegree seeking full-time students taking a minimum of 12 credit hours.

Nondegree seeking full-time students:
Lindsey L. Delauter             Houston, TX
Aaron R. Bassham                Casper, WY
Troy S. Brin                    Casper, WY
Gordon Todd Erickson            Casper, WY
William K. Ferguson             Casper, WY
Lea E. Goering                  Casper, WY
Arthur Ireland                  Casper, WY
Reid Paul Olson                 Casper, WY
Jennifer L. Paad                Casper, WY
John R. Porter                  Casper, WY
Melissa L. Salvato              Casper, WY
Brandy L. Talbot                Casper, WY
Andrea M. Williams              Lander, WY
Andrea M. Williams              Lander, WY
Andrea M. Williams              Lander, WY

Degree-seeking part-time students:
Laura Q. Bond                   Boulder, CO
Errin J. Selensky               Anaconda, MT
Douglas G. Zimmer               Lewistown, MT
Melissa A. Lundin               Altus, OK
Dan C. March                    Canton, SD
Richard H. Broderick Jr         Rapid City, SD
Sylvia R. Livingston            Rapid City, SD
Michael J. Maltaverne           Rapid City, SD
Ammon S. Beddes                 Liberty, UT
Ian S. Tabaracci                Ogden, UT
Joshua A. Brown                 Bar Nunn, WY
Savannah M. Sawyer              Bar Nunn, WY
Danita D. Chesbro               Buffalo, WY
Christine R. Joy                Buffalo, WY
Christine A. Vasco              Buffalo, WY
Amy N. Albert                   Casper, WY
Kalin L. Alexander              Casper, WY
Alison L. Alleman               Casper, WY
Gina M. Allen                   Casper, WY
Ronald W. Allen                 Casper, WY
Tamara S. Armann                Casper, WY
Emilia-Elizabeth M. Arnold      Casper, WY
Jared R. Atol                   Casper, WY
Natasha L. Badger               Casper, WY
Kara K. Baker                   Casper, WY
Kristalei J. Baskins            Casper, WY
Danielle D. Bassler             Casper, WY
Stephine C. Becker              Casper, WY
Michael B. Behrens              Casper, WY
Kimberly A. Benton              Casper, WY
Justis C. Berg                  Casper, WY
RaeAnn Bernat                   Casper, WY
Jayme R. Bjorklund              Casper, WY
Constance L. Blaida             Casper, WY
Crystal R. Blankenship          Casper, WY
Theresa A. Boid                 Casper, WY
Tammy L. Bonnegrace             Casper, WY
Joel Boone                      Casper, WY
Cynthia J. Bower                Casper, WY
Christina M. Bowman             Casper, WY
Fantasia M. Brasmer             Casper, WY
Dee E. Brown                    Casper, WY
Timothy J. Brown                Casper, WY
Jason R. Carlson                Casper, WY
Jason D. Casebolt               Casper, WY
Brooke R. Chynoweth             Casper, WY
Emily J. Claunch                Casper, WY
Tami A. Clay                    Casper, WY
Kristine L. Collins             Casper, WY
Morgan L. Collums               Casper, WY
Kevin L. Condelario             Casper, WY
Kyle L. Condelario              Casper, WY
Rhonda S. Conner                Casper, WY
Meghan E. Creel                 Casper, WY
Beth M. Cross                   Casper, WY
Amanda L. Crowley               Casper, WY
Jennifer L. Crumbliss           Casper, WY
Sarah N. Deschenes              Casper, WY
Lillian C. Dinges               Casper, WY
Gwendolyn M. Doelger            Casper, WY
Kimberly N. Doherty             Casper, WY
Oanh T. Do                      Casper, WY
Grace M. Dorethy                Casper, WY
Stacie L. Dowler                Casper, WY
Michael A. Duffey               Casper, WY
Laura L. Duquette               Casper, WY
Coral M. Dye                    Casper, WY
Meagan M. Dye                   Casper, WY
Tara J. Dye                     Casper, WY
TopLorine C. Edwards               Casper, WY
Brian W. Eleson                 Casper, WY
Sarah A. Emery                  Casper, WY
Raedel L. Enders                Casper, WY
Michelle L. Escobedo            Casper, WY
Dawood E. Esmaiel               Casper, WY
Katherine M. Farquhar           Casper, WY
Elizabeth A. Feeback            Casper, WY
Sarah A. Feeney                 Casper, WY
Janet L. Fivecoat-Asbury        Casper, WY
Kelly L. Gangwish               Casper, WY
Christopher K. Garwood          Casper, WY
Melissa A. Gates                Casper, WY
James G. Gay                    Casper, WY
Lucas B. Gooder                 Casper, WY
Cheryl A. Grapes                Casper, WY
J. Annette Green                Casper, WY
Britnee R. Greenlee             Casper, WY
Ursela M. Groat                 Casper, WY
Ilona R. Grosz                  Casper, WY
Cynthia G. Guy-Thomas           Casper, WY
Susan M. Handley                Casper, WY
Kimberly A. Hanneman            Casper, WY
Mathew R. Hans                  Casper, WY
Heather A. Harns                Casper, WY
Teha L. Harris                  Casper, WY
Jennifer L. Harshman            Casper, WY
Dustin D. Haverlock             Casper, WY
Danielle K. Hendrickson         Casper, WY
Crystal E. Hoffman              Casper, WY
Nicole M. Hool                  Casper, WY
Courtney A. Houston             Casper, WY
Christeen M. Howse              Casper, WY
Kristen K. Hubbard              Casper, WY
Erik D. Hudson                  Casper, WY
Amy D. Hunter                   Casper, WY
Nicole A. Hunt                  Casper, WY
Cynthia L. Hurley               Casper, WY
Manford N. Hurley               Casper, WY
Steven R. Immel                 Casper, WY
Pamela J. Ingle                 Casper, WY
Crimson R. Jennings             Casper, WY
Mark P. Johnson                 Casper, WY
Tanya K. Johnson                Casper, WY
Valeria J. Johnson              Casper, WY
Laurie A. Johnstone             Casper, WY
Jason J. Joreski                Casper, WY
Deborah S. Kerby                Casper, WY
Andrea J. King                  Casper, WY
Leigh Anne Koenigseker          Casper, WY
Brandi L. Kofoid                Casper, WY
Jennifer M. Kolstad             Casper, WY
Jamie N. Komma                  Casper, WY
Melissa A. Kramer               Casper, WY
Brigit J. Kretzer               Casper, WY
Kristi J. Kuhn                  Casper, WY
Kelsey L. Lack                  Casper, WY
Gale L Lara                     Casper, WY
Tricia R. Larson                Casper, WY
Lisa R. Lausten                 Casper, WY
Heidi M. Limmer                 Casper, WY
Jennifer M. Limmer              Casper, WY
Farrell B. Livingston           Casper, WY
Nichol Lofall                   Casper, WY
Wendy J. Lucas                  Casper, WY
Becky J. Lundblade              Casper, WY
Nancy J. Luse                   Casper, WY
Leah M. MacCarter               Casper, WY
Cressie L. Mahaffey             Casper, WY
Thomas V. Marnell               Casper, WY
Everett I. Maynard              Casper, WY
Stephanie R. McBeath-VanDamme Casper, WY
Ty O. McDowell                  Casper, WY
Dawn M. McGeowan                Casper, WY
Mary W. McGilvray               Casper, WY
Megan M. McGirr                 Casper, WY
Jade R. McMichael               Casper, WY
Amber L. Mesecher               Casper, WY
Robyn K. Meyer                  Casper, WY
Kenith R. Middleton             Casper, WY
Anthea B. Miller                Casper, WY
Jeanne M. Miller                Casper, WY
Linda B. Miller                 Casper, WY
Margo L. Miller                 Casper, WY
Mark D. Miller                  Casper, WY
Erienne Mitchelson              Casper, WY
Darren D. Mizokami              Casper, WY
Christine Monson                Casper, WY
Ashley P. Morgan                Casper, WY
Kimberly R. Morrison            Casper, WY
Melanie Myron                   Casper, WY
Wayne P. Neumiller              Casper, WY
Kayla A. Nielsen                Casper, WY
Sandra C. O'Hearn               Casper, WY
Alla Odynets                    Casper, WY
Linda A. Olsen                  Casper, WY
Jamie D. Ostermyer              Casper, WY
Duane D. Ottema                 Casper, WY
Guy V. Padgett, III             Casper, WY
Haydon O. Park                  Casper, WY
Galen R. Patrick                Casper, WY
Midge Payette                   Casper, WY
Jennifer J. Pettry-Johnson      Casper, WY
Randall L. Pickett              Casper, WY
Natalie A. Pique                Casper, WY
Leslie M. Plett                 Casper, WY
Benjamin M. Qureshi             Casper, WY
Heather N. Rice                 Casper, WY
Juliene J. Rivera               Casper, WY
Julie M. Robertson              Casper, WY
Jennifer L. Rodgers             Casper, WY
Robert J. Rodgers               Casper, WY
Mary A. Rodrick                 Casper, WY
Ferris J. Rorabaugh             Casper, WY
Christina A. Rosenof            Casper, WY
Starla C. Rutz                  Casper, WY
Jason A. Sawdon                 Casper, WY
Kelly D. Scherer                Casper, WY
Kenyne N. Schlager              Casper, WY
Zachary D. Schneider            Casper, WY
Stephanie A. Schnitzer          Casper, WY
Brianne M. Sexton               Casper, WY
Howard L. Shaw Jr               Casper, WY
Dorothy C. Shealy               Casper, WY
Elizabeth E. Shear              Casper, WY
Natalie F. Shein                Casper, WY
Ashlee A. Shill                 Casper, WY
Heather L. Sides                Casper, WY
Matthew R. Simoneaux            Casper, WY
Evan L. Slafter                 Casper, WY
Tamela K. Slater                Casper, WY
Emily P. Smith                  Casper, WY
Heather M. Smith                Casper, WY
Steven S. Smith                 Casper, WY
Jessica R. Snyder               Casper, WY
Benjamin A. Stagg               Casper, WY
Mala J. Stagg                   Casper, WY
Tanesia L. Sternhagen           Casper, WY
Steve Stitt                     Casper, WY
Rickie L. Stoner                Casper, WY
Tiffany L. Street               Casper, WY
Sarah A. Sulzen                 Casper, WY
Tabithah B. Sutton              Casper, WY
Andrea D. Swenson               Casper, WY
Erika L. Swirzcki               Casper, WY
Jamie L. Szeliga                Casper, WY
TopRonald W. Tatro                 Casper, WY
Kyler K. Taubert                Casper, WY
Lorie A. Thoma                  Casper, WY
Christopher D. Thomas           Casper, WY
Francis M. Thomas               Casper, WY
Wendee E. Tobin                 Casper, WY
Wendy K. Trembath               Casper, WY
Michael P. Trent                Casper, WY
Noel J. Trost                   Casper, WY
Sherri L. Trujillo              Casper, WY
Polly S. Tufly                  Casper, WY
Korina R. Urban                 Casper, WY
Sonia E. Urban                  Casper, WY
Brandi N. Vigil                 Casper, WY
Danielle C. Walling             Casper, WY
Tori E. Wasserman               Casper, WY
John O. Watson                  Casper, WY
Kyle L. Wattis                  Casper, WY
Matthew W. Watts                Casper, WY
Clint R. Webb                   Casper, WY
Troy G. Wellmaker               Casper, WY
William A. Wells                Casper, WY
Isaac A. Wentz                  Casper, WY
Kody J. Wheeler                 Casper, WY
Misty J. Whitcher               Casper, WY
Candace B. Williams             Casper, WY
Christine A. Williamson         Casper, WY
Tracey L. Willis                Casper, WY
Judith L. Winslow               Casper, WY
Anne W. Wirthlin                Casper, WY
Bridget P. Wolden               Casper, WY
Jermaine D. Wolfe               Casper, WY
Cherry Yann                     Casper, WY
Jacob C. Yelton                 Casper, WY
Carmen A. Young                 Casper, WY
William L. Zimmer               Casper, WY
Nicole V. Graham                Cheyenne, WY
Donna M. Keslar                 Cheyenne, WY
Irene C. Martinez               Cheyenne, WY
Jessica M. Sell                 Cody, WY
Lisa K. Chadwick                Douglas, WY
Shawna L. Cook                  Douglas, WY
Cynthia E. Hansen               Douglas, WY
Connie M. Harn                  Douglas, WY
Shannon L. Polk                 Douglas, WY
Cathy VanNorman                 Edgerton, WY
Carman R. Adams                 Evansville, WY
Katherine F. Cureton            Evansville, WY
Marlo S. Ferris                 Evansville, WY
Tammi L. Hanshaw                Evansville, WY
Ralph E McKnire Jr              Evansville, WY
Mariah N. Olson                 Evansville, WY
Neala A. Roberts                Evansville, WY
Nils Schuetrumpf                Evansville, WY
Deborah A. Schuetz              Evansville, WY
Jessica L. Taggart              Evansville, WY
Chaynee L. Washut               Evansville, WY
Jason P. Yocum                  Evansville, WY
Renee M. Manzanares     Fort Washakie, WY
Betty J. Adams                  Gillette, WY
Romelle C. Hoon                 Gillette, WY
Peggy A. Raine                  Gillette, WY
Heidi M. Stilwell               Gillette, WY
Tanya M. Stratton               Gillette, WY
Jessica M. Barnes               Glenrock, WY
Carolyn M. Bell                 Glenrock, WY
Justin G. Blair                 Glenrock, WY
Kayla M. Bockman                Glenrock, WY
Rebecca J. Dona                 Glenrock, WY
Katie M. Fargen                 Glenrock, WY
Timothy M. Gomes                Glenrock, WY
Kathryn K. Gutierrez            Glenrock, WY
Patricia L. Hiatt               Glenrock, WY
Gina R. Kron                    Glenrock, WY
Tamara C. Mason                 Glenrock, WY
Andrea D. Nelson                Glenrock, WY
Brenda G. Orszulak              Glenrock, WY
Sean J. Orszulak                Glenrock, WY
Reid Z. Phifer                  Glenrock, WY
Katrina R. Rasmussen            Glenrock, WY
Roxanna G. Roberts              Glenrock, WY
Jessica L. Wright               Glenrock, WY
Rebecca S. Figgins              Green River, WY
Jennifer E. Bush                Jackson, WY
Jennifer L. Bly                 Kaycee, WY
Lori C. Straub                  Kaycee, WY
Stanley L McDowell              Lander, WY
Nicole Scott                    Lingle, WY
Deborah K. Moritz               Lovell, WY
Wayne Shrock                    Midwest, WY
James D. Tobin                  Midwest, WY
David O. Baker                  Mills, WY
Drew M. Davis                   Mills, WY
Dana L. Dolenc                  Mills, WY
Megan I. Ferguson               Mills, WY
Keith C. Jones                  Mills, WY
Linda L. Schulz                 Mills, WY
Leann R. Stover                 Mills, WY
Jessica C. Tracy                Moorcroft, WY
Lynn C. Busskohl                Newcastle, WY
Carmela J. Graves               Pine Bluffs, WY
Debra K. Scott                  Powell, WY
Cherie L. Hicken                Rawlins, WY
Corinne R. Schisel              Rawlins, WY
Kathy Skelley                   Rawlins, WY
Troy L. Barnett                 Riverton, WY
Katheleen K. King               Riverton, WY
Jeanine M. Morgan               Riverton, WY
Adam L. Halvorsen            Rolling Hills, WY
Nicole L. Bennett               Saratoga, WY
Tracy L. Buckler                Sheridan, WY
Lori L. Clark                   Sheridan, WY
Theresa J. Hamilton             Sheridan, WY
Antoninette Kassen              Sheridan, WY
Amanda J. Larue                 Sheridan, WY
Jeanne R. Briddle               Shoshoni, WY
Patricia L. Powell              Shoshoni, WY
Janet K. Broers                 Torrington, WY
Pammie R. Rapp                  Torrington, WY
Denise S. Steffens              Torrington, WY
Brian D. Artery                 Wheatland, WY
Brandy L. Cain                  Wheatland, WY
Merri M. Miller                 Worland, WY
TopSamuel T. Shafer II             Wright, WY
David W. Sulewski               Yellowstone National Park, WY

 

Tuesday, June 26, 2007
PRESIDENT’S HONOR ROLL AT CASPER COLLEGE ANNOUNCED

Casper College officials have released the names of students who made the President’s Honor roll at Casper College for the 2007 spring semester. To qualify, a student must take at least 12 hours and receive a grade point average of 3.5 or better. They are:

Carine D. Reimink    Reedy Creek, Australia
Bailey A. Moberly               Aurora, CO
Christina E. Galindo            Denver, CO
Taylor J. Ostergaard            Durango, CO
Gregory A. Ley                  Fort Collins, CO
Kathryn A. Rhoades            Fort Collins, CO
Ashley R. Fulton                Centerville, IA
Ashley E. Nash                  Pocatello, ID
Morgan S. Nash                  Pocatello, ID
Mason B. Oswald                 Pocatello, ID
Cindy L. Van Wagner             Sugar City, ID
Brandy A. Durham                Chicago, IL
Jared W. Martin                 Oregon, IL
Kierstin M. Smothermon          Billings, MT
Chance P. Kilgore               Colstrip, MT
Jordan L. Wells                 Forsyth, MT
Olaf D. Hedstrom                Reedpoint, MT
Brianna M. Bohmbach             Charlson, ND
Victoria R. Armstrong           Brule, NE
Morgan J. Hespe                 Chadron, NE
Brandon J. Lliteras             Chadron, NE
Torey N. Zuver                  Chadron, NE
Douglas H. Adam                 Hyannis, NE
Michelle L. Anderson            Morrill, NE
Cody J. Stewart                 Whitney, NE
Christopher E. Hericks          Rapid City, SD
Michael J. Thomas               Watertown, SD
Shelly J. Thayne                Altonah, UT
Michael O. Hughes               Manila, UT
John M. Pedroza                 St. George, UT
Kendra A. Steadman              Olympia, WA
Alyssa A. Lindemeier            Quincy, WA
Rebecca M. Moore                Albin, WY
Amy L. Farlinger                Banner, WY
Laura B. Camilleri              Bar Nunn, WY
Mykael K. Graham                Bar Nunn, WY
Zachary R. Heid                 Big Horn, WY
Andrew J. Springman             Big Piney, WY
Andrew F. Joy                   Buffalo, WY
Rebeca Martinez                 Buffalo, WY
Manuel D. Rodriguez             Buffalo, WY
Lila B. Scantling               Buffalo, WY
Wesley D. Wells                 Buffalo, WY
David A. Foster                 Carlile, WY
Edwin L. Ferguson, IV           Carpenter, WY
Tasha M. Gumpert                Casper, WY
Nicole A. Aguilar               Casper, WY
Robin L. Ahrndt                 Casper, WY
Thomas F. Aitchison             Casper, WY
Aimee L. Albertson              Casper, WY
Cheryl E. Alexander             Casper, WY
Alicia B. Alger                 Casper, WY
Whitney M. Allen                Casper, WY
Nikki L. Alvey                  Casper, WY
Tyler W. Ambrosino              Casper, WY
Theresa R. Anthony              Casper, WY
Kayla M. Auen                   Casper, WY
Jennifer M. Baca                Casper, WY
Lela M. Bach-Sabus              Casper, WY
Angie N. Bailly                 Casper, WY
Michael L. Baragar              Casper, WY
Andrea D. Barelle               Casper, WY
Kara D. Barrick                 Casper, WY
Mark A. Bates                   Casper, WY
Veronica R. Bates               Casper, WY
Thad S. Behunin                 Casper, WY
Maria C. Beken                  Casper, WY
Lindsey B. Bell                 Casper, WY
Ashley J. Benbo                 Casper, WY
Christopher W. Bender           Casper, WY
Richard A. Bennett              Casper, WY
Bryce M. Berchenbriter          Casper, WY
Austin R. Berlin                Casper, WY
Sheryl L. Bevier                Casper, WY
Krysti L. Bills                 Casper, WY
Genna M. Boatright              Casper, WY
Graham W. Boyd                  Casper, WY
Cynthia M. Brachtenbach         Casper, WY
Mallory L. Brackmann            Casper, WY
Whitney M. Braig                Casper, WY
Teresa K. Brand                 Casper, WY
Donni M. Brantley               Casper, WY
Madison M. Breckenridge         Casper, WY
Matt C. Breckenridge            Casper, WY
Andrea M. Brewster              Casper, WY
Jennifer L. Briggs              Casper, WY
Theresa L. Briscoe              Casper, WY
Caitlyn C. Brown                Casper, WY
William L. Brummond             Casper, WY
John R. Bruno                   Casper, WY
John R. Bryson                  Casper, WY
Travis L. Bullington            Casper, WY
Mark W. Bull                    Casper, WY
Carol J. Burdess                Casper, WY
Elise M. Butler                 Casper, WY
TopArrin A. Cage Welch             Casper, WY
Raymond J. Catellier            Casper, WY
Myra A. Cellar                  Casper, WY
Stephen M. Centanino            Casper, WY
Rachael J. Cestnik              Casper, WY
Kamfung Chan                    Casper, WY
Jennifer C. Clark               Casper, WY
Valerie L. Clarson              Casper, WY
Whitney B. Claypool             Casper, WY
Rose M. Cleary                  Casper, WY
Dena V. Colgrove                Casper, WY
Rebecca S. Conger               Casper, WY
James H. Cordonier              Casper, WY
Michael D. Cotter               Casper, WY
Kathleen R. Couey               Casper, WY
Kaylee D. Cowan                 Casper, WY
Jesse N. Creel                  Casper, WY
Devon B. Crotteau               Casper, WY
Wayne F. Cummings               Casper, WY
Kelsey W. D'Arcy                Casper, WY
Theresa A. Danielson            Casper, WY
Kendra L. David                 Casper, WY
Alicyn A. Davis                 Casper, WY
Loren P. Davis                  Casper, WY
Agata Dawidowicz                Casper, WY
Madelyn J. DeFrank              Casper, WY
Kristin J. Dickinson            Casper, WY
Lori B. Donnell                 Casper, WY
Michael J. Dudack               Casper, WY
Kyle J. Dye                     Casper, WY
Justin C. Dykes                 Casper, WY
Matthew J. Elmore               Casper, WY
Skye C. English                 Casper, WY
Drew A. Felton                  Casper, WY
Gloria L. Fiorini               Casper, WY
Amanda A. Fisher                Casper, WY
Jessica J. Fisher               Casper, WY
Briana C. Flanagan              Casper, WY
Gwendolyn C. Fordham            Casper, WY
Daniel R. Foster                Casper, WY
Robyn H. Frisby                 Casper, WY
Andrea S. Gann                  Casper, WY
Katherine E. Geise              Casper, WY
Luke R. Gilmister               Casper, WY
Rachel J. Gilmore               Casper, WY
Andres Gonzalez                 Casper, WY
Jessica E. Grace                Casper, WY
Shawn C. Graham                 Casper, WY
Tyler D. Griffin                Casper, WY
Courtney J. Griswold            Casper, WY
Leah J. Grosinger               Casper, WY
Irina G. Grosz                  Casper, WY
Kyle A. Gunderson               Casper, WY
Patricia K. Gunderson           Casper, WY
Rachelle C. Gunnels             Casper, WY
Jennifer K. Haddenham           Casper, WY
Andrea L. Hampson               Casper, WY
Eric A. Hanes                   Casper, WY
Cambria J. Harmon               Casper, WY
Melissa A. Harris               Casper, WY
Frederick J. Harrison           Casper, WY
Kenna L. Hasbrouck              Casper, WY
Kody R. Hawes                   Casper, WY
Tonya M. Hedquist               Casper, WY
Theresa A. Heide                Casper, WY
Rachael N. Henley               Casper, WY
Leslie K. Herda                 Casper, WY
Consuelo Y. Hernandez           Casper, WY
Sarah A. Holberg                Casper, WY
Colin B. Holmes                 Casper, WY
Matthew S. Holmes               Casper, WY
Allison M. Horne                Casper, WY
Benjamin J. Houck               Casper, WY
Ryan T. Hughes                  Casper, WY
Cheryl R. Hunt                  Casper, WY
Lauren J. Huntington            Casper, WY
Aryn R. Hurt                    Casper, WY
Kevin L. Hutchinson             Casper, WY
Christena E. Isaacs             Casper, WY
Alisha R. Isaacson              Casper, WY
Christopher M. Isaacson         Casper, WY
Audrey J. Jaeger                Casper, WY
Eric T. Jamieson                Casper, WY
Ashtan L. Johnson               Casper, WY
Jean A. Johnson                 Casper, WY
Leah M. Johnson                 Casper, WY
Marci L. Johnson                Casper, WY
Tamarah L. Johnson              Casper, WY
Barry P. Johnston               Casper, WY
Laura B. Kane                   Casper, WY
Benson H. Kariuki               Casper, WY
Kelsey L. Katen                 Casper, WY
Jahna K. Kaufman                Casper, WY
Sausha L. Kearns                Casper, WY
Traci J. Keating                Casper, WY
Heather K. Keever               Casper, WY
Karissa D. Keever               Casper, WY
Jennifer E. Kessner             Casper, WY
Lori L. Kimball                 Casper, WY
Sean C. King                    Casper, WY
Amy C. Kinner                   Casper, WY
Clayton D. Kirn                 Casper, WY
Amanda J. Knudson               Casper, WY
Tara L. Kofakis                 Casper, WY
Jacqueline M. Koslowsky         Casper, WY
Heidi L. Kriegh                 Casper, WY
Rachel A. Krueger               Casper, WY
Kimberly R. Kunckel             Casper, WY
Tammie D. Lamb                  Casper, WY
Dan C. LaPlatney                Casper, WY
Damian W. Lara                  Casper, WY
Parker S. Larsen                Casper, WY
Sarah J. Lenhart                Casper, WY
Patrick J. Lewallen             Casper, WY
Ka Po Li                        Casper, WY
Aaron J. Locker                 Casper, WY
Andrea D. Long                  Casper, WY
Anne M. Luben                   Casper, WY
Sarah J. Maluchnik              Casper, WY
Cheryl A. Mandich               Casper, WY
Stephanie M. Martin             Casper, WY
Andrew E. Maxon                 Casper, WY
Kimberly S. Maxwell             Casper, WY
Ben W. McCarlson                Casper, WY
Eric W. McDonald                Casper, WY
David A. McNeill                Casper, WY
Faye Medrano                    Casper, WY
Tanya A. Meek                   Casper, WY
Ashkia L. Mestack               Casper, WY
Ashley R. Mikels                Casper, WY
Annessa L. Miller               Casper, WY
Kellen W. Miller                Casper, WY
Robert R. Miller                Casper, WY
Sheena A. Mitchell              Casper, WY
Torrie C. Mitchell              Casper, WY
Shereen D. Mosier               Casper, WY
Tate A. Mullen                  Casper, WY
TopDouglas L. Nelson               Casper, WY
Ashley L. Nickolai              Casper, WY
John K. Niegisch                Casper, WY
Julie A. Norris                 Casper, WY
Dwan G. Orr                     Casper, WY
Lindsey R. Orr                  Casper, WY
Keli R. Ortiz                   Casper, WY
Stevie A. Patton                Casper, WY
Magdalena J. Pawlaczyk          Casper, WY
Michael A. Peppersack           Casper, WY
Nathan L. Perkins               Casper, WY
Bree M. Phillips                Casper, WY
Kameron R. Phillips             Casper, WY
Jeffrey A. Piel                 Casper, WY
Russell A. Pitts                Casper, WY
Russell W. Poer                 Casper, WY
Angelena M. Potter              Casper, WY
Justin D. Putzier               Casper, WY
Jonathan A. Rader               Casper, WY
John M. Raehal                  Casper, WY
Telicia D. Ramon                Casper, WY
Russell W. Reddick              Casper, WY
Paula M. Reece                  Casper, WY
Krista L. Reed                  Casper, WY
Bethany J. Reichenbach          Casper, WY
Courtney L. Reynolds            Casper, WY
Christopher M. Riedl            Casper, WY
Jamie L. Rodenburg              Casper, WY
William D. Royer                Casper, WY
Gregory S. Rumsey               Casper, WY
Keifer A. Russell               Casper, WY
Kelly L. Russell                Casper, WY
Trevor A. Rutar                 Casper, WY
Tiffany M. Sabatka              Casper, WY
Barbara J. Sanders              Casper, WY
Mark B. Sanders                 Casper, WY
Brandon M. Schafer              Casper, WY
Tracey E. Schempp Dudley        Casper, WY
Katelin A. Schenk               Casper, WY
Curtis A. Schulz                Casper, WY
Natalie D. Scissons             Casper, WY
Shaina L. Serelson              Casper, WY
Brooke N. Shafer                Casper, WY
Jerry R. Shafer                 Casper, WY
Stephanie M. Lopez              Casper, WY
Joseph L. Shane                 Casper, WY
Sarah N. Shepherd               Casper, WY
Tiffeny Shockey                 Casper, WY
Madison C. Shoop                Casper, WY
Carol L. Siegel                 Casper, WY
Misti F. Simmons                Casper, WY
Nakalembo N. Simwaka            Casper, WY
Angelia D. Smith                Casper, WY
Heather M. Smith                Casper, WY
Jennifer J. Smith               Casper, WY
Lisa M. Smith                   Casper, WY
Megan L. Smith                  Casper, WY
Tracee A. Smith                 Casper, WY
Nathan K. Soper                 Casper, WY
Janessa R. Sorlien              Casper, WY
Cameo D. Stahl                  Casper, WY
Ashlee K. Stapert               Casper, WY
Leah M. Stefansen               Casper, WY
Denise M. Steinhaus             Casper, WY
James A. Stengel                Casper, WY
Andria K. Sterkel               Casper, WY
Jessica R. Steward              Casper, WY
Christopher A. Stone            Casper, WY
Tiffany E. Stone                Casper, WY
Julie K. Strayer                Casper, WY
Andrea L. Sullivan              Casper, WY
Kelly S. Szewczyk               Casper, WY
Emily J. Thebert                Casper, WY
Jefferie B. Thielbar            Casper, WY
Stephen M. Tygard               Casper, WY
David A. Unruh                  Casper, WY
Sara C. Urban                   Casper, WY
Sarah A. Vahlberg               Casper, WY
Eric C. Vierkant                Casper, WY
Elizabeth A. Waldron            Casper, WY
Jennifer Wales                  Casper, WY
Jessica R. Walker               Casper, WY
Juanita L. Walker               Casper, WY
Kayla G. Walker                 Casper, WY
Kodi A. Walker                  Casper, WY
Morgan L. Walker                Casper, WY
Cynthia I. Wallace              Casper, WY
Amber N. Walsh                  Casper, WY
Angela M. Whitlock              Casper, WY
William J. Whitmire             Casper, WY
Travis R. Wilkinson             Casper, WY
Jennifer L. Wolfe               Casper, WY
Kierah D. Wonser                Casper, WY
Melinda S. Woody                Casper, WY
Mattie J. Wyatt                 Casper, WY
Tawney C. Wylie                 Casper, WY
Liqun Yang                      Casper, WY
Anna T. Ylijarvi                Casper, WY
Philip N. Zaharas               Casper, WY
Marisa J. Beahm                 Cheyenne, WY
Kaley A. Clement                Cheyenne, WY
Christopher T. Kinkade         Cheyenne, WY
Samantha K. Lind                Cheyenne, WY
Christopher A. Poch             Cheyenne, WY
Sarah N. Read                   Cheyenne, WY
Lynnette L. Whipple            Chugwater, WY
Stephen J. Calderon             Douglas, WY
Lenee A. Chamberlain            Douglas, WY
Donald L. Cohrs                 Douglas, WY
Anna R. Duncan                  Douglas, WY
Grant J. Henson                 Douglas, WY
Adam D. Pauli                   Douglas, WY
Dustin S. Pexton                Douglas, WY
Brooke N. Baker                 Dubois, WY
Michael R. Shaw                 Dubois, WY
Hope A. Dewell                  Evansville, WY
Michelle A. Dollentas           Evansville, WY
Ann M. Fisher                   Evansville, WY
Dawna M. Jacobs                 Evansville, WY
Marshall T. Jefcoat             Evansville, WY
Shawn R. Johnson                Evansville, WY
Ingrid C. Jourgensen            Evansville, WY
Tracey P. Sorensen              Evansville, WY
TopMichelle A. Crook               Freedom, WY
Mark E. Fleming                 Gillette, WY
Elizabeth M. Heady              Gillette, WY
Paul M. Lempka                  Gillette, WY
Kimberlie R. Martinson          Gillette, WY
Samantha J. Myers               Gillette, WY
Scott R. Nelson                 Gillette, WY
Edward A. Rosier II             Gillette, WY
Janna M. Schriber               Gillette, WY
Casey W. Urman                  Gillette, WY
Melody A. Dugan                 Glenrock, WY
Kelly A. Fargen                 Glenrock, WY
Meghan D. Ferguson              Glenrock, WY
Paula A Flynn                   Glenrock, WY
Charles R. Hayslip, II          Glenrock, WY
Jennifer R. Hendricks           Glenrock, WY
Holly M. Hodecker               Glenrock, WY
Denielle R. Laird               Glenrock, WY
Jordan E. Nilsen                Glenrock, WY
Casey K. Schell                 Glenrock, WY
Abby C. Uhrich                  Glenrock, WY
Cody J. Wiebe                   Glenrock, WY
Geoffrey C. Zeiger              Glenrock, WY
Christian D. Liedtke            Green River, WY
Anna C. Jennings                Greybull, WY
William A. Haines               Kaycee, WY
David W. Livingston             Lander, WY
Ashley N. McOmie                Lander, WY
Amy L. Merling                  Lander, WY
Robin N. Neubauer               Lander, WY
Madti M. Reed                   Lander, WY
Joel Alworth                    Laramie, WY
Corey R. Haefner                Laramie, WY
Michael J. Even                 Lusk, WY
Will G. Johnson                 Lusk, WY
Amy D. Nelson                   Lusk, WY
Andrew W. Smyth                 Lusk, WY
Jeremy J. Fahy                  Manville, WY
Kelsey A. Roberson              Meeteetse, WY
Charlene Shrock                 Midwest, WY
Carol Alumbaugh                 Mills, WY
Brenda A. Fisher                Mills, WY
Veronica L. Julian              Mills, WY
Justine M. Patton               Moorcroft, WY
Ryan D. Hieb                    Newcastle, WY
Nicole D. Thomas                Pavillion, WY
Jennifer B. Crandall            Pine Bluffs, WY
Ryan W. Cain                    Pinedale, WY
Tessi R. Travis                 Pinedale, WY
Kai B. Blakesley                Rawlins, WY
Sara E. Bohl                    Rawlins, WY
Cassandra R. Robinson           Rawlins, WY
Kelsey M. Warren                Rawlins, WY
Patrick J. Cosner               Riverton, WY
Marta K. Poff                   Riverton, WY
Delina M. Schiefer              Riverton, WY
Molly A. Steele                 Riverton, WY
Ashton L. Wilcox-Brown         Riverton, WY
Olivia J. Rakness               Saratoga, WY
Sara B. Rangitsch               Saratoga, WY
Jacob W. Clouthier              Sheridan, WY
Gerald H. Phipps                Sinclair, WY
Mary L. McNally                 Sundance, WY
Mary M. Brown                  Thermopolis, WY
Trevor J. Hostetter             Thermopolis, WY
Shandi L. Foos                  Torrington, WY
Matthew K. Perkins              Torrington, WY
Seth L. Perkins                 Torrington, WY
Tamara J. McMillan              Upton, WY
Ashley E. Moody                 Wheatland, WY
Nicholas J. Uhrig               Wheatland, WY
Shawn G. Wilde                  Worland, WY
Cheralee J. Willard             Worland, WY
Kimberly A. Wise                Worland, WY
Sherri A. Bertagnole            Wright, WY
TopChelsey A. Kiefat               Wright, WY
Ting Yue                        Chengdu, ZZ

 

Tuesday, June 26, 2007
THREE OF FIFTEEN LIVESTOCK JUDGING ALL-AMERICANS FROM CASPER
Three of the Livestock Judging All-Americans named for the 2006-2007 academic year are from Casper College: Randell Von Krosigk of Shoshoni, Wyo., Kayla Auen of Casper, Wyo., and Nicole Thomas of Pavilion, Wyo.

According to Heath Hornecker, Casper College livestock judging coach, each year the National Junior College Livestock Judging Coaches Association selects 15 All-Americans from the livestock judges active in that calendar year’s events. “Selection is based upon the performance of the students at six national contests – Kansas City, Louisville, Denver, Ft. Worth, San Antonio and Houston – and their academic success,” says Hornecker.

“Those students that are selected are not only the best livestock judges but also the most academically accomplished. There are usually 23-25 schools that are represented at these National Contests and 125 students that are eligible for selection,” Hornecker says.

All three Casper College students have won many awards and honors throughout the year and at all six national contests. Each has a grade point average above 3.5.

Hornecker notes that Von Krosigk and Auen have accepted full-ride scholarships to Kansas State University to continue their livestock-judging career, while Thomas will stay in Casper and pursue her nursing career.
“This is quite an honor for three of our members to be named to All-American status considering the number of schools and students that are eligible for selection. It is truly an indication of the student’s talent but most importantly work ethic to achieve great judging and academic success all in one,” says Hornecker.

For more information on the Casper College livestock judging program and team contact Hornecker at 800-442-2963, ext. 2525.

 

Thursday, June 14, 2007
TATE MAMMOTH DIG RESUMES

Sundell and Cavigelli hope to retrieve complete skull.

Last fall when digging up the remains of “Dee,” a Mammuthus columbi or Columbian Mammoth, Casper College geologists, Tate Geological Museum workers and volunteers knew they would return the following summer for the rest of Dee’s bones. At the time of the site closing, Kent Sundell noted, “We still have five major big bones to find.” Those bones are the skull, a tusk, the lower jaw and the tibia and ulna in the leg.”

Sundell, Casper College geology instructor, and J.P. Cavigelli, Tate prep lab manager, are again co-supervising what they hope will be the final excavation at the site.

“We are digging now through July 6, or until we find most of the missing bones or convince ourselves we've found what there is,” says Cavigelli.

Based on bone size measurements, “we know that Dee is bigger than any of the mammoth specimens at the Hot Springs mammoth site in South Dakota,” notes Sundell. Dee is thought to have lived between 10,000 and two million years ago (known as the Pleistocene Epoch), and stood about 14 feet tall at the shoulder.

At the time of death, Dee is thought to have been a full-grown adult based on the condition of his bones. “I would say that Dee was at least 40 years old – middle age for mammoths since the average lifespan for a mammoth is thought to have been between 60 and 80 years,” Cavigelli says.

The public is invited to volunteer or view, however casual drives out to the site are not allowed. Because the mammoth site is on private land, people coming to the dig must have Tate Geological Museum or landowner permission.

Those wishing to volunteer are asked to come to the Casper College Tate Geological Museum to sign up in person. “This is an excellent opportunity to partake in a unique dig – this may be Wyoming's most complete mammoth, and is a large individual. Last year in six weeks we found and collected about 120 complete bones and another hundred bits and pieces, many of which are now on display at the Tate Geological Museum,” Cavigelli notes.

According to Cavigelli, volunteers can take their own vehicles out, and will be given directions to the site. No experience is necessary and tools and guidance will be provided. Those wishing to camp out at the site can do so as well, but campfires are not permitted. Work runs on the site from 8 a.m. to around 6 p.m. and is flexible.

Public visiting days will occur on three Saturdays: June 16, 23 and 30. Visiting-day plans call for everyone to leave the Tate together in the morning.

The Tate Geological Museum is located on the south end of the Casper College campus, or for more information, call 268-2447, toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2447.

Dee the mammoth background information:
Dee Zimmerschied, a bulldozer operator for Basic Energy Services of Newcastle, Wyo., accidentally discovered the mammoth’s remains, specifically the pelvis. “Dee was making an oil well drilling location pad on a piece of land on the Allemand Ranch near Douglas, Wyo. when he came across the pelvis,” says Kent Sundell, Casper College geology instructor and excavation co-supervisor.

Basic Energy Services was preparing the location pad for Joe Scott Enterprises of Casper, Wyo. “Joe Scott Enterprises thought that this discovery was important enough that they had Allen and Crouch Petroleum Engineers of Casper redesign the location to insure protection of the bone resources. In addition, Nerd Gas Company of Casper is a working interest partner in the well and they too support protection of this site adjacent to their well site operations,” notes Sundell.

According to Sundell, the well site and mammoth bones are on private deeded surface land owned by the Allemand Ranch. “The owner of the ranch, Bart Byrd, is generously donating this find to the Casper College Tate Geological Museum,” says Sundell. The excavation site is named “Allemand Ranch Site,” Douglas, Wyoming.

Initial identification and preliminary fossil exposure was done by Sundell, J.P. Cavigelli, Tate prep lab manager and excavation co-supervisor, and several Casper College geology/paleontology students in March, 2006. At that time, 28 bones, including the pelvis, ribs, and vertebrae were initially uncovered.

TopThe specimen has been named “Dee” in honor of Zimmerschied.

 

Wednesday, June 13, 2007
FELLOW PHYSICIANS HONOR LATE DOCTOR WITH SCHOLARSHIP

A scholarship in the memory of Dr. Paul Johnson has been established by his fellow physicians at Casper College.

“The Paul Johnson Memorial Scholarship” will provide financial assistance to students who are studying to become medical laboratory technicians, according to Paul Hallock. “The establishment of this scholarship recognizes the growth of health science programs on our campus,” says Hallock, Casper College Foundation executive director.

Drs. Gregory Brondos and Robert Tobin initiated the scholarship. “These two doctors sent out a letter to their colleagues in central Wyoming informing of their intention, and requesting donations to support the idea. So far more than $11,000 has been received from our medical community,” Hallock says.

The monies received have been matched by the State of Wyoming as part of an additional matching fund initiative and “the fund balance is now over $22,000,” notes Hallock.

“This is a wonderful tribute by Paul’s many friends and represents a commitment from the medical community to not only remember a colleague, but to encourage students to pursue a career in medical laboratory technician at Casper College,” Hallock says.

The first Paul Johnson Memorial Scholarship will be awarded in the spring of 2009.

 

Tuesday, June 12, 2007
WERNER WILDLIFE SUMMER HOURS ANNOUNCED

Summer hours for the Casper College Werner Wildlife Museum are Monday through Friday from 2 to 5 p.m. each day, now through August 3 excluding the July 4th holiday.

According to Sarah Sulzen, Casper College academic assistant, the Werner Wildlife Museum is home to a variety of “vertebrate wildlife indigenous to Wyoming including fish, amphibians, and reptiles, as well as birds and mammals.”
The museum also has on display a number of other animal specimens from Asia, Malaysia, Africa, Europe and others.

Admission is free and Sulzen notes that tours are available during other times of the day by appointment calling 235-2108.

 

Monday, June 11, 2007
BULL SELECTED AS “TLC” FOR 2006-2007 ACADEMIC YEAR

In only his first year as an instructor at Casper College, Doug Bull has received the distinction of “Terrific Learning Coach” (TLC) for 2006-2007 at Casper College.

Bull, band and brass instructor began teaching at the college in August of 2006. “I think this is great,” he says of winning the award. “I am terribly humbled and very honored. This award tells me that I am reaching students. A standard has been set, and I can’t let down now!”

The TLC award is presented each month, September through April by the Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) student honor society at Casper College. From those eight recipients, the TLC coach of the year is chosen.

According to Jim Ochiltree, vice president of student services and a PTK sponsor, the recipients of the TLC monthly and yearly awards “are not only academically but personally involved with their students. Each of these instructors is passionate about what they do.”

The TLC recipients for the 2006-2007 academic year are: September, Patrick Amelotte, English; October, Chad Hanson, sociology; November, John Chase, biology; December, Ben Lareau, English; January, Gretchen Wheeler, communications and forensics; February, Angel Sharman, volleyball coach; March, Tracy Hollister, mathematics, and Bull.

Ochiltree noted that this is the 18th year that the TLC of the month and year recognitions have been awarded.

 

Monday, June 11, 2007
ADMINISTRATOR AND STAFF RECOGNIZED BY STATE

Janet de Vries has been recognized with the professional staff award and Erica Costello has been recognized with the student of the year award from the Wyoming Association of Community College Trustees for the 2006-2007 academic year.

de Vries, director of the Casper College Career Center, was noted for her ability to communicate, willingness to accept responsibility, high energy level and professionalism. “Janet represents Casper College with enthusiasm and vigor,” says Alison McNulty, admissions and student records director.

The recipient of the 1997 Casper Woman of Distinction award, de Vries is “a confident, effective, creative individual with a high energy level and a deep sense of commitment to whatever challenge she takes on. She always goes beyond what is expected and strives for the ‘extraordinary,’” notes McNulty.

A high achieving nontraditional student, Costello has already completed an associate of science degree in wildlife management but continues to take Casper College science and foreign language classes to support and supplement her UW degree curriculum.

Costello was recognized for her academic honors and successes, participation in student activities, work to improve Casper College and efforts to bring positive recognition to the school.

“Erica is an outstanding person who exemplifies the academic prowess, the personal characteristics and the community involvement that this award acknowledges,” says Jim Ochiltree, vice president of student services at Casper College.

In addition to her educational achievements, Costello has been a tireless volunteer who has given of her time for the past 20 years. “She is someone who believes in ‘paying it forward’ to help others in the community,” notes Ochiltree.

As a Casper College student Costello stayed busy through her involvement with the Phi Theta Kappa chapter at Casper College, serving as president for the 2006-2007 academic year. In her role as Phi Theta Kappa president, Costello was an initiator for the chapter’s service involvement with Project Gradation: Feed a Body/Feed a Mind, the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life, the Jason’s Friends Society’s Bowl-A-Thon, the Casper Humane Society’s Dog Walk fund raiser, and the Meals On Wheels Craft Fair.

TopThe awards are presented annually by the WACCT.

 

Wednesday, June 6, 2007
BIKER CULTURE EXPLORED IN AFTERNOON SESSION

For many the term "biker" still conjures up images of bad guys on motorbikes. But a special Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at Casper College lecture aims to change that.

"People still have wrong ideas about men and women who ride motorbikes - they think that all bikers are scary or that they are rebels, but that just isn't the case," says Vicki Pollock, OLLI specialist.
Presented by Dan Cantine and members of the Natrona County H.O.G. (Harley Owners' Group) chapter, "Hogs and History - Biker Culture in America" will not only show that the rebel image of the biker has changed over the years to include baby boomers and business people, but will look at the history of bikers and biker culture.

Following the lecture, participants will visit the local Harley-Davidson store to meet the staff and view some of the bikes discussed in the lecture.

"Hogs and History - Biker Culture in America" (OLLI 7030-01) will be held on Thursday, June 28 from 2 to 5 p.m., and the cost is $8 per person. To register or for more information on this and other OLLI programs at Casper College, call 268-2100.

 

Tuesday, June 5, 2007
LITERATURE AND READING CLASS OFFERED ON NET

For the first time "Literary Genres: Short Story" (ENGL 2440-N1) will be offered online during the summer semester at Casper College.

The course will provide students throughout the state with an opportunity to study short stories from a wide variety of authors including Phillip K. Dick, Edgar Allen Poe, Stephen King, Nathaniel Hawthorne, D.H. Lawrence, Amy Tan, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Anton Checkov, and James Joyce.

"The stories will be studied in an historical context, emphasizing close reading, critical analyses, and the development of the short story as a literary genre," says Melanie Young, English instructor.
According to Young the class should prove most appealing to those who like literature and reading, such as those who enjoy book clubs. And, because the course will be taught online, students will be able to set their own schedules.

The summer semester begins Monday, June 11 and runs through Friday, August 3. To register, call Casper College at 268-2100 or toll free at 800-442-2963.

 

Tuesday, June 5, 2007
READING BAND BEGINS; OPEN TO ALL

A new reading band is being formed at Casper College, according to Doug Bull, band and brass instructor at the college.

A reading band is composed of musicians who can play music by sight.

"Wyoming has never had a reading band, so it seemed logical that Casper College should be the place for musicians to get consistent experience in this area," says Bull.

According to Bull three Saturday sessions have been scheduled for the summer - June 9 and 30 and July 21. Further scheduling will be announced at a later date. Each session will be held in the Aley Fine Arts Center, Room 107 from 1 to 3 p.m. and are open to all musicians. Participants should bring their own instrument.

Through the reading band Bull hopes to expose more players to big band swing and the styles of many varied writers and bands from the big band era to the present. "We will be playing music written for large bands, and this will include swing," says Bull.

"Most places have reading bands and people just love to play in them. You see these a lot of these in metro areas. I was surprised that there were none in Wyoming," Bull adds.

For now those who come to play will be doing it for enjoyment, but Bull hopes that in the future the group will be able to perform in concert.

 

Tuesday, June 5, 2007
FICTION COURSE PREPARES WRITERS FOR PUBLISHING

Learn how to write fiction and get published in “Writer’s Workshop in Fiction” (ENGL 4050), a course offered through the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center this summer.

Part-time instructor Patrick Amelotte will lead students in the reading of fiction, including short story classics by Ray Carver, Richard Ford, Yukio Mishima, Edna O’Brien, and Anton Chekov. While learning the art of naming characters, writing dialogue, and creating narrative, students will write their own stories, which will be reviewed by classmates in a workshop format.

In addition, Amelotte will discuss the mechanics of getting published, including how to write query letters and where to send manuscripts.

“By the end of the class, students will have compiled three lists of publishing companies to send their manuscripts – an A-list, a B-list, and a C-list,” said Amelotte.

TopFor more information about this or other exciting summer courses, call the UW/CC Center at 268-2713.

 

Tuesday, June 5, 2007
SULZEN RECOGNIZED WITH DURST AWARD
 
Casper College Academic Assistant Sarah Sulzen has been recognized with the first Robert Durst Classified Staff Award.

Sulzen was chosen from 11 nominees. “Sarah stood out above the rest of the nominees as a tireless supporter of the staff at Casper College. She is an outstanding role model and a wonderful person,” says Rachel Wright, Durst committee chair.

“In a relatively short period of time, beginning in August 1999, Sarah has become part of the operations of the Casper College Life Science Division in general, and the biology department in particular. She is the person that keeps the faculty on track. Since coming to Casper College, Sarah has become involved in many aspects of the campus such as the United Way Campaign and various committee assignments. Her knowledge of campus is extensive and was acquired very quickly,” says Tom Clifford, life science division chair.

Former Casper College Biology Department Chair Doug Crowe notes that “Sarah is keenly aware of the need for Wyoming’s community colleges to be visible and involved in their communities and for the personnel of these colleges to be cared for and thus retained. Her concern and action on these fronts clearly demonstrates her commitment to this educational system.”

Sulzen was chosen based on a number of criteria including personal improvement, participation in campus activities and participation in community activities.

The Robert Durst Classified Staff Award is named in honor of Robert Durst, former Casper College custodial worker who recently retired after nearly 27 years at the college.

In addition to a commemorative plaque, Sulzen also received a check for $1,000.

 

Tuesday, June 5, 2007
IMPROVE WRITING SKILLS IN PRACTICAL COURSE

The University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center is offering "Technical Writing in the Professions" (ENGL 4010) this summer, a practical course designed to build written communication skills for the corporate environment and other work settings.

Patrick Amelotte, part-time instructor for the UW/CC Center, will discuss the importance of concise communication in business, with a focus on writing reports, application packages, PowerPoint presentations, and more.

"The course will emphasize clear communication," said Amelotte. "Students will learn how to move away from the jargon."

"I often speak with employers who say that they wish their employees had better writing skills," said Brent Pickett, associate dean and director of the UW/CC Center. "This course is specifically designed to help build those skills. The ability to write well is frequently a key to job advancement."

For more information about this or other exciting courses, contact the UW/CC Center at 268-2713.

Friday, July 13, 2007
BILL STRICKLAND TO HEADLINE LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP AT CC

Seats are still available for Casper College’s next Professional Success Series workshop featuring nationally known community leader and motivational speaker Bill Strickland. The workshop will take place on Tuesday, July 24.

The Art of Leadership – Unleashing Your Creativity” is designed to “instill creativity into the workplace, to motivate employees and to encourage innovation,” says Laura Driscoll.

“I believe that Strickland’s simple message of leadership through believing in people and treating them with respect strikes a universal cord. I have heard Strickland speak on several occasions and he has received a standing ovation at each. Bringing Strickland to Casper is a wonderful collaborative effort between Casper College and CAEDA,” adds Driscoll, Casper College dean of continuing education and community partnerships.

In addition to Strickland, Gretchen Wheeler and Linda Ryan will also be presenters. “Bill Strickland will begin the workshop and Gretchen and Linda will follow with presentations,” says Driscoll.

Wheeler, Casper College communication instructor, will present “Adding the Artistic ‘Lilt’ to Leadership” while Ryan, Casper College art instructor, will lead a hands-on workshop entitled: “Creating Alchemy.”

“Gretchen’s presentation will examine the role of laughter in the work place, draw the connections between laughter and leadership, and provide opportunities to ‘apply’ this miraculous talent to different styles of leadership,” Driscoll says.

During Ryan’s hands-on portion of the workshop attendees will be engaged in creating artistic works from ordinary household materials. “Through manipulating these humble materials in unexpected ways, participants will experience the power of creative thinking and its potential to transform their approach in generating ideas,” says Driscoll.

The day will end with Ryan and Wheeler who will explore the realm of infinite possibilities for expansion and growth in the individual workforce and business setting. “With the use of ‘The Art of Leadership’ tools: proper attitude, creative frame of mind, and artistic lilt, participants will share in a direct application activity resulting in a unique vision for an innovative approach to leadership,” notes Driscoll.

Registration cost is $199 per person and includes lunch. “The Art of Leadership – Unleashing Your Creativity” workshop will take place in the Roberts Commons TopBallroom at Casper College. To register contact Ann Dalton at 268-2085 toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2085 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu/success.

August 31, 2007
T-BIRDS OPEN STRONG AT TWIN FALLS, PLAY WYOMING FOES TODAY

The Casper College volleyball team will face six back yard opponents this weekend at the Wyoming Conference tournament in Cheyenne.

Angel Sharman's T-Birds are coming off a strong performance in their season-opening tournament at Twin Falls, Idaho, where they finished 4-3 and stood toe-to-toe with traditional powers College of Southern Idaho and Salt Lake CC.

Sharman knows the conference affair will be a good test. While the T-Birds defeated Western Wyoming last weekend, their coach says she expects WWC and Central Wyoming to be very good. Those three clubs battled for regional supremacy a year ago, with WWC outlasting Casper in the championship match of the tournament.

The T-Birds play Northwest College at 1 p.m. today, Central Wyoming at 3 and Eastern Wyoming at 7. On Saturday, the Birds face Laramie County at 11, Sheridan at 3 and Western Wyoming at 5.

As for her T-Birds, Sharman says her goal is that they continue to improve. "We've had good practices all week and the girls are beginning to learn what they can do," she says. "Now it's just a matter of getting better every week."

Savannah Searle, the freshman from Shelley, Idaho, stepped into the setter's role and wound up with 148 assists in 15 games. She also served at a 96 percent clip. Sharman's international trio of Agata Dawidowicz, Maja Jechorek and Julia Gruszecka were outstanding. Dawidowicz averaged 4.4 kills per game. Sharman also praised Bridget Neal (Gillette), who moved to the libero position and recorded 98 digs. Freshman Vanessa Muir (Star Valley) helped anchor the middle and led the T-Birds in blocks.

The T-Birds' first home match is Sept. 11 against Western Nebraska.

 

Friday, August 24, 2007
WATER, LAND, DEVELOPMENT TOPIC OF UW FALL SERIES IN CASPER

The intricate connections between water and land in Wyoming, and the ease with which development can disrupt them, are the topics of the University of Wyoming's lecture series in Casper this fall.

The University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center series, free and open to the public, begins September 13 from 7 - 9 p.m., and runs five Thursday evenings through November 15. The lectures will be held in Room 103 of the Casper College Physical Science Building.

"Delicate Networks" examines the water-land connection that sustains Wyoming's much-loved landscapes, and how Wyoming people are seeking to protect those networks when dealing with residential and industrial development.

Development issues affecting land and water in a number of communities including Casper, Buffalo, Cheyenne, Laramie and Pinedale will be addressed by guest speakers from those communities and from the University of Wyoming.

A UW/CC Center course, for undergraduate and graduate credit, is being offered in conjunction with the series. Registration for the course is still open, and the class starts Aug. 30.

The series is sponsored by UW's Helga and Otto Haub School and William Ruckleshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources, the UW/CC Center, the UW Outreach School, and the Casper Star-Tribune.

For more information on the series or to register for the course, call the UW/CC Center at 268-2713.

 

Thursday, August 23, 2007
SPOTS STILL OPEN FOR T-BIRD SCRAMBLE GOLF TOURNAMENT

A few team spots still remain for the T-Bird Scramble golf tournament, scheduled for Sept. 7 at the Casper Country Club.

The tournament is hosted by the T-Bird Booster Club and sponsored by Pepsi-Cola Bottling of Casper. There are three divisions again this year – Master's, T-Bird and Women's. The Master's Division allows two golfers to carry a 12 handicap or lower (the other two golfers must be 13 or above). All four team members must carry 13 handicaps or higher to compete in the T-Bird division.

Players will be shooting for hole in one prizes on every par three and many other great prizes. Cost is $120, which includes a season basketball pass, a great T-Bird gift, greens fees, cart and dinner. Since the tournament has sold out the past eight years, golfers are encouraged to register right away.

For more information about the tournament, or to register your team, call 268-2667 or 268-3000.

 

Monday, August 20, 2007
SHARMAN HOPES SEVENTH SEASON WILL BRING ANOTHER BANNER

Casper College volleyball coach Angel Sharman has been around long enough to know that you take nothing for granted.

Maybe that’s why there was some urgency when the T-Birds began their three-a-day workouts in August. Even though Sharman welcomed back what many consider to be a top twenty national caliber team, she knows that these T-Birds haven’t dug or spiked anything yet.

Much work lies ahead if these T-Birds hope to return to the championship match – a spot they have occupied three years running.

This 2007 contingent, Sharman’s seventh team at Casper College, is loaded with sophomores who experienced an up and down season (27-23) and the loss in that championship match. The Polish trio of Agata Dawidowicz, Maja Jechorek and Julia Gruszecka is formidable all by itself. Bridget Neal (Gillette) is back on the outside and Victoria Armstrong (Brule, Neb.) is back in the middle.

Add to that stable of hitters a returning setter in Kari Tofte, and well, it’s easy to understand why Sharman’s team is earning some votes in the national polls.

All three of Sharman’s international stars – Dawidowicz, Gruszecka and Jechorek – earned post-season honors a year ago, either all region or all tournament. Dawidowicz was the team’s leading hitter with 535 kills. Jechorek and Armstrong combined for more than 200 blocks.

Fans remember a 2006 campaign, which was marred by injury. Neal struggled all season long with back pain. Meanwhile, Tofte broke her foot barely 10 matches into the season. She returned the week of the Region IX tournament and nearly led the T-Birds to a national tournament appearance.

Good as she was a year ago, Tofte has a battle on her hands this fall. Savanna Searle, a 5-8 freshman from Shelley, Idaho, looked good enough in preseason to give Sharman some options. If Searle can anchor the setter position some of the time, Tofte could shore up a defense that lost Kylie Peck from a year ago. Peck was arguably one of the top two or three defenders ever to play for the T-Birds. Tofte and Searle may actually share time at the quarterback position. Not far behind those two is Breanne Tobin of Kaycee, who is an outstanding setter in her own right. Sophomore Jodi Williams will be counted upon in the back row.

Other newcomers include Cherise Bona, a 5-10 hitter from Taylorsville, Utah; Katie Young, a 5-9 hitter from Casper (Natrona); and Vanessa Muir, a 6-0 hitter/blocker from Star Valley. As if opposing defenses didn’t already have their problems, Bona and Muir have the potential to provide immediate help on the outside.

Sharman says the return of so many strong sophomores gives her some luxury. “They’re coachable and know what it takes,” she says. “The number two thing about this team is that everyone has potential to be a great player.”
“The ’03 team was strong, but this might be the best hitting team we have had,” she adds. “They need to come together as a group, and not fall into petty conflicts. Mental toughness will be a key.”

Even though strong defense has been a hallmark of Sharman’s teams, she admits that she would like her T-Birds to be stronger at the net this fall. “Believe it or not, I thought our blocking held us back last year. There were times that we just seemed to relax and not take care of our responsibilities.”

As usual, the T-Birds will find the going tough early in the season. The schedule includes Top Twenty caliber teams like Salt Lake, North Idaho, the College of Southern Idaho and Snow College, along with Western Wyoming, the team that nipped the T-Birds in last year’s championship match.

The T-Birds open their season Aug. 24 (Friday) at the College of Southern Idaho tournament. Their first home match is scheduled for Sept. 11 against Western Nebraska, another Top Twenty team.

TopIf the T-Birds can get through a tough schedule and find the chemistry their coach is looking for, count on them to be one of the favorites at tournament time.

 

Monday, August 20, 2007
SHARMAN: THERE IS STILL WORK TO DO

Casper College volleyball coach Angel Sharman says she didn’t even know it was coming.

The milestone, that is.

When she was honored last September for her 300th career victory, it caught her totally by surprise. The T-Bird coach is generally more concerned about getting her team ready for the next match than how many career victories she has.

Still, it is worth noting that Sharman is one of the top 30 volleyball coaches in the country in terms of career wins. She is entering her seventh season at Casper College and her 12th season as a college coach. Her career record is an impressive 320-271.

During her tenure with Casper College, the T-Birds have racked up 210 of those wins for an average of 35 match victories per season. Not bad, especially when you consider that Sharman always plays a tough preseason schedule that includes several Top Twenty programs.

But the quiet T-Bird coach would be the first to say that players, not coaching wins, and they are her focus. That’s why she didn’t even realize she had reached a milestone last season.
Sharman has coached four NJCAA All Americans, eight academic All Americans and 19 all-Region IX performers. Her 2003 team won the Region IX West championship.

In the past two seasons, the T-Birds wound up bridesmaids, not brides. They narrowly missed another title in 2005, and lost in the championship match again last season.

Her first three years as Casper coach were easily the best three seasons in program history. The 2003 team racked up 43 match victories. Her winning percentage at CC still hovers close to 68 percent.

Her goal this season is simple. “We want another banner,” she says.

Sharman coaches a very aggressive style of volleyball. At the net, the T-Birds will attack. But defense has probably been the hallmark of the Sharman era. Her teams are always among the best defensive teams in the country. She has coached the likes of Kylie Peck, Trisha Clark, Whitney Schilling and Katie Bird – some of the best defensive players in the history of Region IX volleyball.

Off the court, the T-Birds have also shined. Last season, the T-Birds posted a team GPA of 3.56, and three T-Birds earned academic All-America honors. That is no accident either. “I want my players to graduate,” she says.

Sharman serves as physical education department chair at Casper College. She was an outstanding basketball and volleyball player at Mid-Plains Community College (North Platte, Neb.) and Fort Hayes State (Kan.). She played for NJCAA Hall of Famer Sally Thalken at Mid Plains. Prior to coaching in Casper, she coached for five seasons at Colby College (Kan.), where she led her teams to two Region VI playoff appearances.

Sharman earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Fort Hays State.

 

Monday, August 20, 2007
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY OFFERED IN NIGHT CLASS

If you are like most people with a digital camera you have some great photos on your computer that you would like to turn into prints, but just don’t know how. It may be easier than you think, with the help of a digital photography class being offered for the fall semester at Casper College.

“Electronic Digital Photo” (ELTR 2145) will include the basic techniques of digital photography and an overview of what is needed to acquire, store, retouch, and print digital and hybrid photographs.

Miles Hecker, digital photography professional, will teach the class on Thursday nights from 6 to 9. Hecker will start with the basics of digital photography and also cover the use of scanners and printers. Students will learn the basics of Adobe’s Photoshop software program to both restore prints, negatives and slides, and to create prints from digital camera images.

For more information or to register, call Casper College at 268-2207. “Electronic Digital Photo” begins on August 30.

 

Monday, August 20, 2007
CLASSIC FILMS PART OF CRITICISM CLASS

Students enrolling in a class that has not been offered at Casper College in quite a while, “Film and Society” (ENGL 2490), will be viewing a number of classic films from the 1960’s to the early 21st century.

“Students will learn to use the vernacular of film and film criticism. In the process we will study the great film critics and write some of our own,” says David Zoby, instructor.

“So far I have 30 films that I want to show, but I will cut that down to 10 or 12,” Zoby notes.

Films Zoby is considering for the class include: “The Birds,” “The Wild Ones,” “Easy Rider,” “The Wild Bunch,” “Full Metal Jacket,” “The Shining,” “Monsoon Wedding,” the documentary “Grizzly Man,” and “Monster.”

“Film and Society” will be held on Thursday nights from 6 to 9 p.m. For more information or to register call Casper College at 268-2207, toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2207 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Friday, August 17, 2007
COLLEGE ANNOUNCES NEW SCHOLARSHIP HONORING JASON CORBETT

A new scholarship honoring Corporal Jason Corbett is currently seeking applicants for the fall 2007 semester that attended Kelly Walsh High School.

According to Corbett’s mother, Megan Schafer, the memorial was established in February 2007 following the death of Corbett. Corbett died on January 15 from injuries sustained when his military unit came in contact with enemy forces during combat operations in Karmah, Iraq.

“This scholarship was created for students who often fall through the cracks and don’t qualify for financial support due to need or merit. Without financial help, these students just aren’t able to go on to college – my son Jason fit into this category,” says Schafer.

“We decided to do this scholarship because something positive needed to come out of his death,” Schafer says. Schafer was inspired to begin the scholarship in part because of the scholarship that Brenda Kennedy had been instrumental in establishing for her son Jacob Kennedy and Emily Milliken following their deaths last year. “Knowing what she had done was how I came up with this idea,” notes Schafer.

“After Jason died I received tons of cards from his teachers and people I didn’t even know who knew Jason. They all remembered his smile and how it lit up the room and his friends all said he was always very encouraging. I didn’t know it, but he really made a big difference in so many people’s lives,” Schafer says.

Applications for the Corporal Jason Corbett Memorial Scholarship are available at the Office of Financial Aid at Casper College. Several scholarships will be awarded to Casper College sophomores who either graduated from Kelly Walsh High School or TopGED graduates who attended Kelly Walsh. Application deadline is Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2007.

 

Thursday, August 16, 2007
LITERATURE AND HUMANITIES ELECTIVES OFFERED FOR FALL

Casper College is offering 10 different classes on literature and the humanities for the fall 2007 semester. Each class will provide an opportunity for anyone wanting to read and talk about some of the finest works ever written.

Students enrolled in “J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis: The Men, Their Careers, Their Writings” (ENGL 2025) will not only read works by Tolkien and Lewis, but also read works about these two fascinating men “for a better understanding of their lives as scholars and writers,” says Jay Graham, English instructor at Casper College.

Graham will also teach “Introduction to Shakespeare” (ENGL 2230), “World Literature I” (ENGL 2140), and “Ideas in Renaissance Literature” (HUMN 2252). “In ‘Introduction to Shakespeare’ students will begin a study of Shakespeare’s major works by reading dozens of the Bard’s plays and sonnets,” says Graham. In “World Literature I” students “will examine the literature of the classical period of ancient Greece and Rome and also look at the art, religion and philosophy,” he says.

“Ideas in Renaissance Literature” will take the word ‘literature’ in the broad sense, and cover the humanities of the Renaissance. According to Graham, students will be exposed to Renaissance humanities through readings in the areas of philosophy and science, the plays of Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, and Webster, and poetry and fiction.
Under the direction of Terry Rasmussen, Casper College English Instructor, “Creative Writing: Poetry” (ENGL 2080) will help to enhance each student’s understanding of poetry and poets through critical and creative writing and reading. In addition, students will write free and formal verse through weekly writing assignments.

“The Bible as Literature” (ENGL 2170) will be taught by Casper College adjunct instructor Stan Durham, who says that students “will learn the key genres of biblical literature that form the common roots of the Judeo-Christian tradition: essay, poetry, drama, and story.”

Students will survey a sampling of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the 18th century in “English Literature I” (ENGL 2210). According to Casper College English instructor Evelyn Brummond, the class will emphasize reading, discussing, and writing about important works in our literary heritage.

Casper College English instructor Ben Lareau will teach “American Literature I” (ENGL 2310). “America has a treasure trove of great writers which students will discover as they explore major writers from the Civil War to the mid-20th century,” notes Lareau.

In “Native American Literature” (ENGL 2340) students will experience the richness of Native American culture through a study of its folklore, autobiographies, and contemporary literature. According to Gwen Remington, Casper College English instructor the class will place an emphasis on early Wyoming-based tribes through this online offering.

For more information or to register for these and other classes at Casper College call 268-2207, toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2207 or log on to www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Tuesday, August 14, 2007
NATIVE AMERICAN LIT OFFERED FOR FIRST TIME ONLINE

For the first time, students will be offered a broad cultural study of Native American literature online through Casper College.

“Native American Literature” (ENGL 2340) will be a combination of the written word and videos, both fictional and biographical.

According to Gwen Remington, Casper College English instructor, the class will appeal to “anyone fascinated by the uncomplicated culture of America’s first inhabitants, appreciative of the courage demonstrated by them during the colonization era, appalled by their living conditions during the early reservation decades, and inspired by their rise in the past half century.”

Books that will be read during the course include: “Native American Literature: A Brief Introduction and Anthology,” “Black Elk Speaks,” “Cheyenne Memories,” “Lakota Woman,” “Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven,” and, says Remington, “a just-for-fun novel by one of the top Native American authors, Linda Hogan, entitled ‘Mean Spirit.’”

The online class is available to anyone, anywhere who can connect to the Internet and complete online class work.

To register, or for more information contact Casper College at 268-2207, toll free at 800-442-2963 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Tuesday, August 14, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE AND SENIOR CENTER OFFER COMPUTER TRAINING
Casper College and The Central Wyoming Senior Center are offering “Introduction to Computers” (CEU 1000) beginning on Monday, Sept. 10.

The Casper College continuing education class, which will be held at the Senior Center Computer Lab, is designed for new users, and will cover such topics as computer terminology, hardware, software, mouse skills, and the Internet. “This is a great way to learn how easy it is to use computers in a relaxed, interesting, and stress-free atmosphere,” says Jan Burnett, instructor.

According to Burnett, handouts will be provided, so students are not required to purchase a book. The hands-on computer class will run for four weeks, and will be offered at two different times: 1 to 3 p.m. or 3 to 5 p.m.

For more information, or to register, contact Jamie Boyce at Casper College by calling 268-3399.

 

Tuesday, August 14, 2007
NEW UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP CLASS BEGINS SEPTEMBER 18

A new 13-week class for immigrants planning to apply for United States citizenship will begin on Monday, Sept. 10.

According to Lisa Mixer, Casper College tutor coordinator and ABE/GED co-director, the class is designed for those individuals who are able to speak, read, and write some English and are within one year of being eligible to apply for citizenship.

Mixer noted that the class is free and “will provide participants with a full understanding of United States history and government.”

The Casper College Adult Basic Education/GED Center sponsors the United States citizenship class. Pre-registration is required for the class, and can be done between August 27 and September 10 by calling Mixer at Casper College at 268-2453.

 

Monday, August 13, 2007
ABE/GED/ESL OFFER FALL LOCATIONS AND TIMES FOR LEARNING

The locations and times of operation have been released for adult basic education (ABE)/GED instruction and English as a second language (ESL) for the 2007 fall semester from Casper College.

Free instruction is provided to adults in basic reading, basic writing, basic math, and GED preparation.

The ABE/GED Center at Casper College is open on Monday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., Wednesday from 1 to 8 p.m., Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The center is located in the Werner Technical Center, Room 115 on the Casper College campus.

According to Lisa Mixer, tutor coordinator and ABE/GED co-director, a mandatory new student orientation will be held every Tuesday at 8 a.m., 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. at the ABE/GED Center. Orientation will be held in Room 102 of the Werner Technical Center. No appointment is necessary.

The Casper Workforce Center (CWC), located at 851 Werner Court, Suite 120, is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Finally, the ESL Program will be conducted at the North Casper School, on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. and again from 6 to 8 p.m. in portable number 2. The school is located at 1014 N. Glenarm.
Fall hours will begin on Monday, August 27.

TopFor more information on these programs stop by the Casper College ABE/GED Center or call Mixer at 268-2453.

 

Wednesday, August 8, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE OFFERS FIRST-YEAR COURSES IN HOT CAREER FIELD

Casper College will be offering four first-year electronics classes for the fall semester.

These four classes should be taken by anyone interested in a career in electronics technology, or who what to learn the basic knowledge of electronic circuits for their own use," says Dave Arndt, electronics instructor.

"There are many high paying employment opportunities in the electronics industry, both locally and regionally. I receive calls on a regular basis from employers looking to hire Casper College students who have these skills, notes Arndt.

"Electrical Concepts Lab" (ELTR 1620) will emphasize the analysis and troubleshooting of simple AC and DC circuits. Additional topics, which will be covered, include magnetism and electromagnetism, says Arndt.

Arndt noted that "Electrical Concepts Lab" should be taken concurrently with "Electric Circuits" (ELTR 1570). "Electric Circuits" will study the fundamentals of DC and AC circuit analysis, electromagnetics, and single-phase transformers.

The third class, "Introduction to Digital Electronics" (ELTR 1760) "teaches students the basics of digital circuits which are used to build microprocessors and many other electronic circuits," Arndt says.

Finally, "Electrical Design and Fabrication" (ELTR 1750) is a class, which uses "industrial processes to design and fabricate electronic circuitry. We will cover such topics as soldering, computer-generated schematics, computer-designed PC boards, industrial etching processes, and sheet metal fabrication," Arndt adds.

For more information or to register, call Casper College at 268-2207 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Wednesday, August 8, 2007
ECOLOGY CLASS REVEALS BOTH SIDES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUE

This fall, discover the diverse mythologies of the western United States in "Topics in Cultural Ecology: The American West" (GEOG 4540/5540), offered through the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center.

Through nature writing, government reports, fact, and fiction, students will analyze who lives in the west, why they live there, and how they interact with their environment. After choosing an area of interest, students will conduct a research project and lead the class in a discussion based on their findings.

"I've taught this class several times in the past," says Jerry Nelson, lecturer of geography at the UW/CC Center. "Students like the discussions. It helps them to examine, in detail, their own personal misconceptions or conceptions about land and how we deal with the land. It's a real eye-opener for some people."

Nelson's involvement with the oil industry as well as environmental causes provides the foundation for well-rounded discussions.

"This class will be no environmental rant," adds Nelson. "We will explore all aspects of the ecological issue."

Contact the UW/CC Center at 268-2713 or 1-877-264-9930. Fall semester at the UW/CC Center begins August 27.

 

Friday, August 3, 2007
HOW TO LIVE WITHIN YOUR BUDGET CLASS OFFERED AT CASPER COLLEGE

For those who have a hard time staying within their budget, or who would like to simply learn the efficient management of money, “Personal Finance” (BADM 1030 01) will be offered at Casper College during the fall 2007 semester.

“Personal Finance can and will help anybody have a more successful and happy life at home. Students will learn how to budget their money, purchase an automobile and home, understand insurance products and do retirement and estate planning. This is a great class that will help anyone improve their life regardless of their profession,” says Mark Oxley, instructor.

“Personal Finance” will be offered during the lunch hour on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The class is recommended as an elective for business and nonbusiness majors “and anyone who wants to learn how to manage their money,” says Oxley. The class can be taken for credit or audited.

Fall semester begins on Monday, Aug. 27. For more information on this class or to register, call Casper College at 268-2207, toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2207 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Friday, August 3, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE STUDENT RECEIVES COCA-COLA SCHOLARSHIP

Casper College student Rocky Fisher has been awarded a $1,000 scholarship from the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation.

Fisher, a CISCO networking major at Casper College, was recognized for “demonstrated academic success and participation in community service within the past 12 months,” according to the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation.

“These recognitions are a great indication of the quality of students we have at Casper College,” says Carmen Simone, vice president for academic affairs.

Through the Coca-Cola Two-Year Colleges Scholarship Program, the Foundation awards a total of 400 scholarships annually to students attending higher-education institutions granting two-year degrees.

In April, one scholar from each state received a $2,000 scholarship from Coca-Cola through the New Century Scholar Program of the American Association of Community Colleges and Phi Theta Kappa, the two-year college scholastic honorary organization. Casper College student Sarah Read represented the state of Wyoming in that elite Topgroup. This summer, an additional 350 students were awarded a $1,000 scholarship, of which Fisher was one.

 

Friday, August 3, 2007
COLLEGE ANNOUNCES AUGUST MEETING TIMES

The Casper College District Board of Trustees will hold its August board meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 21 beginning at 7 p.m. in the Strausner Student Center, Room 217.

 

Friday, August 3, 2007
LEARN ON CASPER COLLEGE WITH FREE CLASS OFFER

Casper College officials are offering Wyoming residents the chance to take a Casper College class for free.

To qualify prospective students must: be a resident of Wyoming, have graduated from high school or earned their GED before July 2002, and have not taken a college class in the last five years.

“If a person can answer yes to those criteria, then they qualify to take one three-credit class of their choice from those listed in the fall 2007 schedule,” says Darry Voigt, director of financial aid at Casper College.

Once qualified, students can choose a class for fun, or get started on a degree – there are no restrictions. A large variety of classes are being offered this fall, from serious subjects like statistics to fun topics like ceramics. In addition, there are many career-related classes offered in auto body repair, electronics, extractive resources, and machine tool to name just a few.

“A course placement test may be required for some classes, and fees may apply,” notes Voigt.

For more information and to take a class on Casper College this fall, stop by the Casper College Admissions and Student Records office in the Administration Building, Room 132, call 268-2100, toll free at 800-442-2963, or log on to www.caspercollege.edu/1stop.

 

Friday, August 3, 2007
UW/CC CLASS TAKES PILGRIMAGE WITH CHAUCER

Take a pilgrimage with the knight, the wife of Bath, the cook, and more in “Chaucer” (ENGL 4160), offered through the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center this fall.

Bruce Richardson, senior lecturer of English at the UW/CC Center, will lead students down a path of discovery when they read, discuss, and study “The Canterbury Tales” in its original Middle English dialect. The course will focus on the work itself, supporting materials about the tales, and the Middle Ages in general.

“Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’ is a dazzling array of entertainment: funny, dramatic, bawdy, spiritual, and sometimes shocking,” Richardson said. “We will read all of them and learn about the Middle Ages and Chaucer’s language along the way.”

The English writer Geoffrey Chaucer survived the Hundred Years War, the Peasant’s Revolt, the Black Death, three English kings, time in a foreign prison, and a long career of writing satirical and edgy works that nonetheless pleased his patrons. He did his writing while working many jobs: forester, justice of the peace, diplomat, chief of customs, and director of the Tower of London and other royal and public properties. His vast knowledge of all parts of society, plus his wit and skill as a writer, come together in “The Canterbury Tales,” said Richardson.

To learn more about “Chaucer” and other exciting fall courses, contact the UW/CC Center at 268-2713.

 

Thursday, August 2, 2007
ROLE OF WATER PIPES IN RURAL SPRAWL TOPIC OF UW TALKS IN CASPER OCT. 18

How investments in big water pipes to serve Wyoming communities can play a role in rural sprawl will be the topic of talks in Casper on Thursday, Oct. 18.

Public investment in major water systems – like investments in roads or other utilities – can either help or hinder local people in directing where rural development happens and where open spaces might remain, as speakers for the University of Wyoming’s free lecture series in Casper will discuss.

“Laying Pipe” will be the fourth evening in the series “Delicate Networks: Wyoming’s Land and Water and the Decisions Demanded by Growth,” at the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center.

The event, free and open to the public, takes place at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 18, in the Wheeler Auditorium, Room 103 of the Wold Physical Science Center on the Casper College campus.

Don McLeod, from UW’s department of agricultural and applied economics, and Scott Lieske, from the university’s Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center, will discuss studies they’ve worked on that examine the impact of or aid in the planning of new big public water pipelines, in northern and central Wyoming.

John Woodward, planner for Lincoln County, will discuss work now underway to see what can be done to create regional water supplies for the Star Valley, which has seen considerable scattered residential development in recent years.

UW’s “Delicate Networks” series examines the intricate water-land connections that sustain Wyoming’s much-loved landscapes, and the ease with which development can disrupt those connections. It also explores how Wyoming people are seeking to protect those networks when dealing with development, especially residential growth.

Development issues affecting land and water in a number of communities including Casper, Buffalo, Cheyenne, Laramie, and Pinedale will be addressed by guest speakers from those communities and from the University of Wyoming.
The series is sponsored by UW’s Helga and Otto Haub School and William Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources, the UW/CC Center, the UW Outreach School, and the Casper Star-Tribune.

For more information on the series, call the UW/CC Center at 268-2713.

 

Thursday, August 2, 2007
STUDY THE UNIVERSE AT CASPER COLLEGE

As physics instructor Andrew Young puts it: “Admiral Adama has the Battlestar Galactica, Captain Kirk has the USS Enterprise and students in my class will have a round-trip ticket to the universe!”

“Survey of Astronomy” (ASTR 1050) and the accompanying “Survey of Astronomy Lab” (ASTR 1050L) are both entry-level courses and fulfill the general education need for a lab science. “Students will study the planets, stars, galaxies, and the universe itself,” says Young.

Both the class and lab are being offered at different times to help accommodate students. According to Young, students will have the choice of attending the class itself on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 1 to 1:50 p.m. or on Tuesday and Thursday nights from 6 to 7:15. The lab portion of the course will be held on either Tuesday or Wednesday night from 7:45 to 9:35.

For more information or to register for “Survey of Astronomy” (ASTR 1050) call Casper TopCollege at 268-2207 or toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2207 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Thursday, August 2, 2007
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES NOW OFFERED ONLINE

A new online class designed to fill the requirements for a general education lab science and also fill the requirements for atmospheric sciences will be offered by Casper College for the fall semester.

While the course is open to anyone, Gerald Nelson, geology and geography instructor at Casper College, notes, “This particular course is needed by many education majors.”

According to Nelson, “Atmospheric Sciences” (ATSC 2000 N1) is a first course in meteorology designed for students who have a minimal background in math and science. “This course will provide a general and practical understanding of weather phenomena including atmospheric composition and structure, radiation, winds and horizontal forces, stability and vertical motions, general circulation, synoptic meteorology, clouds and precipitation, severe storms and climate, and climate change.

Fall classes begin at Casper College on Monday, Aug. 27. For more information about “Atmospheric Sciences” contact Nelson at 268-2233 or toll free at 800-442-2963, etc. 2233.

 

Thursday, August 2, 2007
LOW VOLTAGE TEST PREP OFFERED
 
If you need help wading through the electrical code Casper College is offering “Licensing for Electronics” (ELTR 2515 N1).

“This class is designed to prepare people who need to take the Wyoming Low Voltage Exam WLVE to become certified low voltage electricians,” says Megan Graham, instructor. The class is being offered as a combined Internet class with optional Saturday discussion sessions.

The course is intended for electronic, electrical, industrial and educational technicians who need to be certified, and, in addition to the WLVE, will focus on the Federal Communications Commission, Certified Electronics Technician, and other national certification exams.

The fall semester class will begin on Monday, August 27.

For more information or to register, contact Graham at 268-2539; toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2539 or by email at mgraham@caspercollege.edu.

 

Thursday, August 2, 2007
UW/CC CENTER STUDENT RECEIVES STIPEND, EXPERIENCE

Stephanie Jensen, a senior in the BOCES-supported secondary education science program at the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center, received a $3,000 stipend from the Wyoming Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). The new stipend was developed for students within the secondary teacher education program (STEP), allowing the recipient to experience laboratory research while creating engaging lesson plans. Only four students received the scholarship – three from UW Laramie and Jensen from the UW/CC Center.

Throughout the summer, Jensen has worked with the UW/CC Center’s research team on species of Eimeria, a group of protozoan parasites found infecting many animals around the world.

“I’ve had about seven weeks of hands-on experience, which I probably would not have had the opportunity to be involved in without the EPSCoR STEP stipend,” said Jensen. “I’ve learned how to manage a lab, how to set up research experiments, and how to start a project.”

Jensen’s experience in the laboratory will help foster the creation of lesson plans based on her research.  With the assistance of Dagmara Motriuk-Smith, Jensen’s mentor and assistant lecturer of zoology at the UW/CC Center, and Scott Seville, principal investigator and associate professor of zoology at the UW/CC Center, Jensen will develop ways to bring her practical experience into the high school classroom.

“The summer project involves designing laboratory experiments that can be implemented in the secondary education classroom,” said Motriuk-Smith. “In the fall or spring, these experiments will be performed by the high school students during Jensen’s internship.”

Working to isolate and sequence deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) throughout the research, Jensen is excited about the opportunity to teach such an important aspect of biology to her students.

“DNA is such an important part of our lives; it makes us who we are,” said Jensen. “We see DNA used more in prosecuting crimes and in paternity tests. I am now able to order a DNA test on my mixed breed dog to determine what breeds he has in him.”

Jensen will present her lesson plans and her laboratory experience at Undergraduate Research Day in Laramie this spring. In addition, she is eagerly anticipating her graduation in May, when she will begin her teaching career.

“Science will help all students, regardless of the line of work they want to go into,” said Jensen. “It can be applied to road construction and the mixing of concrete, to cooking, to forensic science. I can’t wait to excite the students about science by sharing with them the experiences and knowledge that I’ve acquired.”

 

Wednesday, August 1, 2007
COURSE EXAMINES WYOMING’S LAND, WATER CONNECTION

“Topics: The Land and Water Connection in Wyoming” (ENR 4890/5890), offered through the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center this fall, will focus on the effects of residential and industrial growth on Wyoming.

Anne MacKinnon, a part-time instructor for the UW/CC Center, will lead the class in discussions about the potential impact of newly constructed housing, Wyoming’s vulnerability due to scarce water resources and the effects that residential and industrial growth will have on the state.

“The course will focus on the challenges such problems pose to an assortment of communities across the state,” said MacKinnon, “and the innovative approaches Wyoming communities are taking.”
During class, students will choose an issue to research and then develop options for handling the problem. In lieu of an exam, they will compile their research results into a final written and oral presentation.

“Students will get acquainted first-hand with people involved with these issues from around the state, and will get a chance to grapple with some aspect of a current real-life land-water impact problem in Wyoming,” MacKinnon added.
Six presentations will be given by community experts on related topics during the course, as part of the UW/CC Center’s regular fall lecture series on natural resource issues. Students are expected to attend for course credit and public attendance is encouraged.

TopContact the UW/CC Center at 268-2713 for more information on this and other interesting courses.

Thursday, September 27, 2007
ALUMNI TO HONOR JACQUOT AT BANQUET

The Casper College Alumni Association will be honoring Raymond Jacquot at its 18th Annual Alumni and Friends Banquet on Saturday, Oct. 6 at the Parkway Plaza.

“Dr. Jacquot is being honored for his distinguished career as an educator, author, and mountain climber,” says Linda Nix, alumni assistant.

Tickets for the banquet are now on sale and are $30 per person. The banquet will begin with a no-host cocktail hour at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner at 6 p.m.

A Casper native, Jacquot graduated from Casper College in 1958 with an A.A. degree. He earned his B.S. (1960) and M.S. (1962) degrees from the University of Wyoming and a Ph.D. (1969) from Purdue University.

Jacquot spent his entire teaching career at UW where he retired in 2001 with the title Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering. During his career as an educator, he taught 49 different courses, primarily in engineering. He has published three major textbooks, chapters in five other books, and countless refereed journal articles. The Wyoming Engineering Society selected him as the President’s Outstanding Engineer for 2007.

Other awards include the John P. Ellbogen Meritorious Classroom Teaching Award, as well as the Sigma Tau Outstanding Teaching Award for three separate years. The American Society for Engineering Education Rocky Mountain Section honored Jacquot with their 2000 Teaching Award.

Jacquot’s current research is in the area of passive control of transient vibration in structural dynamic systems. Other recent efforts involve the authoring software for the animation of solutions to dynamic systems governed by partial differential equations.

In addition to his academic accomplishments, Jacquot is a renowned mountain climber. During his time at Casper College he was a member of the Casper College Mountaineers that existed from 1955 to 1958. Jacquot completed a book on the history of the club, “CC on the Rocks: The Story of the Wyoming Mountaineers of Casper College,” in 2005, the year of the 50th anniversary reunion of the Mountaineers. On July 29, 1961, Jacquot, along with partner Herb Swedlund, made the first ascent of the Black Ice Couloir on the Grand Teton, the classic ice route in the United States. He was among the first to climb other routes in the Tetons, Wind Rivers, Big Horns, Devils Tower, Vedauwoo, and the Snowy Range.

Tickets for the banquet must be purchased by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2. For more information or to purchase tickets contact the Casper College Alumni office at 268-2218 or toll free at 800-442-2963, ext. 2218.

 

Tuesday, September 25, 2007
RANCHERS NEED NEW OPTIONS IN SUBDIVISION PRESSURE,UW SPEAKERS SAY

Wyoming ranch families can be under major economic pressures to turn ranches into residential developments, and they need better options when they face such decisions, a leading stockman and a pioneering developer say.

The work of the Wyoming Stock Growers Association with the Wyoming Legislature’s committee dealing with subdivisions, and the potential for creating residential development while still preserving significant ranch operations, open space, and wise use of water resources will be the topic of talks in Casper on Thursday, Oct. 4 at the University of Wyoming’s free lecture series.

“Cutting Up Land” is the third evening’s talk in the series “Delicate Networks: Wyoming’s Land and Water and the Decisions Demanded by Growth,” at the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center.

The event, free and open to the public, takes place from 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 4, in the Wheeler Auditorium, Room 103 of the Wold Physical Science Center on the Casper College campus.

One of the options for ranch families facing tough economics should be “not to cut up land,” says John Jenkins, with Sand Creek Ranch Preservation Co. in Buffalo.

Ranchers should be able to partner with someone who can help them do something better, Jenkins says. He has turned his family’s ranch into a housing development that combines clusters of homes overlooking haying and cattle operations, and includes a conservation easement with the state of Wyoming, improved ranchland irrigation, and a centralized water system and planned septic layouts for the new homes.
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Jim Magagna, executive vice-president of the Wyoming Stock Growers Association, has been working with the legislature’s Joint Committee on Corporations, Elections, and Political Subdivisions in its review of subdivision laws. Magagna has proposed to the committee that it find ways to provide the opportunity for the kind of development which people like Jenkins are exploring. Jenkins says he had to overcome a number of disincentives in current law in order to accomplish his goal.

The typical rural residential development in Wyoming simply divides up a ranch into private parcels, with homeowners expected to rely on individual wells and septic systems.

Some development of former ranch lands avoids having to deal with any rules on water, roads, or other infrastructure by simply creating parcels larger than 35 acres, which are exempt from the state’s subdivision laws.

Over time, a series of private wells and septic tanks may eventually exhaust the capacity of area water resources, or the homeowners’ patience, and subdivisions around the state have ended up turning to the State of Wyoming for millions of dollars in public funds to create workable water and sewer systems, state reports show.

Magagna, on behalf of the Stock Growers, has proposed that the Legislature address the impacts of large-lot subdivisions, considering setting guidelines that would apply to them and perhaps allowing the imposition of impact fees. Others involved with the issue have noted that impact fees might be designed to help create an incentive for creation of clustered rural housing with open space.

UW’s “Delicate Networks” series examines the intricate water-land connections that sustain Wyoming’s much-loved landscapes, and the ease with which development can disrupt those connections. It also explores how Wyoming people are seeking to protect those networks when dealing with development, especially residential growth.

Development issues affecting land and water in a number of communities including Casper, Buffalo, Cheyenne, Laramie, and Pinedale will be addressed by guest speakers from those communities and from the University of Wyoming.

The series is sponsored by UW’s Helga and Otto Haub School and William Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources, the UW/CC Center, the UW Outreach School, and the Casper Star-Tribune.

For more information on the series, call the UW/CC Center at 268-2713.

 

Monday, September 24, 2007
CHEERLEADER TRYOUTS SET AT COLLEGE

The Casper College Thunderbird Coed Cheerleading Squad is seeking new cheerleaders for the 2007-2008 school year. Tryouts are scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 29 beginning with check in at 9 a.m. in the Administration Building Gymnasium.

According to Kim Byrd, sponsor, the try out will cover dance routines, gymnastic skills, and floor cheers. “Gymnastics skills are not required, but extra points will be given for those who demonstrate skills,” notes Byrd. The day will end with group stunting and females performing a dance in small groups.

Students who tryout will be judged on cheers, stunts, jumps, dance and “their appearance, enthusiasm, coordination, flexibility, and ability to be a team player,” Byrd says.

All students who try out should be in good physical condition. “Because of the heavy physical demands on cheerleaders, strength, conditioning and flexibility are necessary to prevent injuries and to perform stunts well,” says Byrd. The squad will include 10 to 12 cheerleaders, two alternates and one mascot.

To reserve a spot or for more information, contact Byrd at 268-2255, toll free at 800-Top442-2963, ext. 2255 or Tasha Colella at 720-280-6615. All applicants must provide proof of medical insurance.

 

Tuesday, September 18, 2007
WYOMING GROUNDWATER NEEDS PROTECTION FROM RURAL SPRAWL, CITIZEN LEADERS SAY

How long groundwater will be available to serve growing Wyoming communities, whether it will be good drinkable water, and who is “watching the store” on groundwater issues are the questions that motivate two citizen organizers from southeast Wyoming towns who will speak in Casper Thursday evening.

The good news is that citizens can help keep watch and take action to make a difference in protecting and conserving groundwater, say the two presenters in this week’s forum on “Delicate Networks: Wyoming’s Land and Water and the Decisions Demanded by Growth,” the second round of lectures at the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center.

The event, free and open to the public, takes place from 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 20, in the Wheeler Auditorium, Room 103 of the Wold Physical Science Center on the Casper College campus.

The two speakers Thursday will be Jim Cochran, manager of the Laramie County Conservation District, and Diana Hulme, member of an active group that has worked to protect groundwater in Albany County.

They will discuss the work of their organizations to highlight groundwater issues, get information to city and county officials on relevant geology and chemistry, and get good decisions made.

 “Science actually can impact policy” when citizens join together to make sure their elected officials have good information, says Hulme.

Her group recently succeeded in convincing the Laramie City Council to declare a current one-year moratorium on development in parts of the city where the city’s vulnerable groundwater-supply aquifer is recharged with new water.
How long groundwater supplies will last to support growth in and around Cheyenne is a big question for Cochran and his staff.

The Laramie County Conservation District, like all Wyoming conservation districts, is required by law to comment on all rural subdivision applications. That process has led the district to concerns about the rapid growth of rural subdivisions in the county. In such subdivisions, homeowners are typically expected to rely on individual wells for drinking water – and to build private septic systems, which if poorly done can pollute the groundwater that they and many others depend upon.

The district has been instrumental in promoting a state-funded study now being done for the county on groundwater supplies and conditions in the county, which Cochran said may ultimately give county commissioners better tools to decide where and what subdivisions should be permitted.

 “Delicate Networks” examines the intricate water-land connections that sustain Wyoming’s much-loved landscapes, and the ease with which development can disrupt those connections. It also explores how Wyoming people are seeking to protect those networks when dealing with development, especially residential growth.

Development issues affecting land and water in a number of communities including Casper, Buffalo, Cheyenne, Laramie, and Pinedale will be addressed by guest speakers from those communities and from the University of Wyoming.

The series is sponsored by UW’s Helga and Otto Haub School and William Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources, the UW/CC Center, the UW Outreach School, and the Casper Star-Tribune. Hulme, one of the speakers Thursday, is also assistant director of the Ruckleshaus Institute.

For more information on the series, call the UW/CC Center at 268-2713.

 

Monday, September 17, 2007
WECA KEYNOTE TO BE DELIVERED BY ALFIE KOHN

Alfie Kohn, a nationally renowned speaker and writer on education and parenting, will deliver the keynote address at the 2007 Wyoming Early Childhood Association (WECA) conference, scheduled for Sept. 21-22 at the Casper Parkway Plaza.

Kohn’s talk begins at 8 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 22 and is open to the public as well as WECA members. He will base the WECA address on his book, Beyond Discipline: From Compliance to Community. The keynote address is co-sponsored by the University of Wyoming/Casper College Center, Natrona County School District 1, and Albany County School District 1.

Kohn’s other books on education and parenting include Punished by Rewards, Unconditional Parenting, The Homework Myth and The Schools Our Children Deserve. He is one of the foremost voices heard in current debates on education in America today, including discussions about the No Child Left Behind Act.

UW College of Education faculty member Allen Trent is the WECA’s featured Wyoming speaker. Trent, head of the UW Department of Educational Studies, will open the conference on Friday night. In a session titled  “Playing with Theories: Teaching, Learning, Art and Community,” Trent will engage participants in hands-on activities that demonstrate the connections between learning theories and the arts.

Other program highlights include pre-conference workshops on “Operating a Successful Child Care Business” and “Learning Environments – The Essential Teaching Element,” and a Saturday luncheon speech by Wyoming early childhood development educational consultant Anita Sullivan.

Teachers, professionals in early child care and education, child advocates, parents and other interested citizens are welcome to attend the conference or Kohn’s keynote. For more information on the Casper event, or to register for the conference or the keynote, visit the WECA website, http://www.wyeca.org/, or call the WECA office, 1-877-234-3162.

 

Monday, September 17, 2007
SPEAKER TO DRAMATIZE HISTORY OF WOMEN’S WORK

Dorene Ludwig will use voices from history to raise questions about how society perceives and values women’s work on Monday, Oct. 1 at Casper College.

During her free presentation, “Hemmed In: Work-Life Patterns of American Women,” Ludwig will portray working women in America from colonial printers and whip makers through the factories of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Her characterizations of working women from the sweatshops to the corporate cubicle will raise thought-provoking questions about how society values women’s work, today and yesterday.

Ludwig is the artistic director of the American Living History Theater in Greybull and has appeared in one-woman productions before audiences coast to coast. She travels widely and has served as a trainer for NASA, the U.S. Army, the National Park Service and various other institutions.

“Hemmed In: Work-Life Patterns of American Women” is presented by the Wyoming Humanities Council and sponsored by the Casper College Department of Women’s Studies and the Casper College Career Center. The presentation is the first in a series called “It’s All Women’s Work.”

The free presentation will begin at 7 p.m. in the Black Box Theatre located on the southeast side of the Gertrude Krampert Theatre on the Casper College campus.

The next speaker in the series will be Melanie Francis. Her program, “Power Laced Petticoats: Wyoming’s Caroline Lockhart and Mary O’Hara,” will be presented on Tuesday, Oct. 9 at 7 p.m. in the Black Box Theatre.

Ludwig’s presentation is offered by the Wyoming Humanities Council through its 2007 Humanities Forum. Council programs explore the human experience – our lives, our communities, our world – in partnership with nonprofit organizations throughout Wyoming. Emphasis is placed on fostering forums for discussion among Wyoming residents.

Major funding for the council comes from the National Endowment for the Humanities and private contributions.

 

Friday, September 14, 2007
SPECIAL DINNER TICKET PACKAGE OFFERED FOR ETHNIC MEALS

A special ticket package is being offered for this year's five ethnic dinners at Casper College.

The first dinner, the Ninth Annual International Food Tasting Party, will be held on Friday, Sept. 28. The other four dinners will feature foods from Vietnam on October 25, Australia on January 31, the British Isles on March 6, and the Mediterranean on April 3.

The cost for the ticket packages is $35. If tickets were purchased individually in advance for each ethnic dinner the total cost would be $41.25. The savings is even larger for those diners who purchase their tickets individually at the door and spend a total of $45.

"Selling both the dinner ticket package and individual ethnic dinner tickets in advance helps us to better plan for the amount of food we need to have prepared," says Tim Hammerschmitt, food service general manager.

The ethnic dinner ticket package will be available for purchase through Friday, Sept. 21. The packages can be purchased at the Roberts Commons Cafeteria Monday through Thursday from 7 to 9 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4:45 to 6:45 p.m.; at the coffee bars located in the Administration Building and the Wold Physical Science Center between the hours of 8 a.m. and noon, and in the Casper College Office of Accounting and Financial Management from 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., Monday through Friday. Credit cards are now being accepted at the cafeteria and two coffee bars, but not in the business office.

TopThe ethnic dinner series is sponsored by the Casper College Diversity Committee.

 

Friday, September 14, 2007
CONNELY NAMED FIRST KLAENHAMMER CHAIR

Casper College geology instructor Melissa Connely, has been selected as the first "Klaenhammer Chair for Earth Sciences."

The chaired position was made possible by "a generous endowment to establish a new academic chair at Casper College given by Helen Klaenhammer and her family," says Paul Hallock, executive director of the Casper College Foundation.
"The Klaenhammers recognize the extremely important role the studies of geology, archaeology, and geography play in Wyoming and the West. It is the donor's desire that preference be given to women faculty members first. Earnings from the Klaenhammer endowment will fund Connely's salary for 2007-2008," Hallock says.

"The Klaenhammer Earth Science Chair was to be specifically chosen from one of three fields: Geology, Geography, or Archeology. An additional stipulation for the honor was a preference for a female faculty member - Dr. Walter Nolte and I felt that it was especially important to respect that preference. Melissa exemplifies all that is essential for a faculty member. She is excellent in the classroom and in the field, and she is deeply committed to our students. She is one-of-a-kind, and we are very fortunate that she has chosen to call Casper College home," says Carmen Simone, vice president for academic affairs.
" The endowment underscores the importance of the Earth Sciences to Casper College and the greater Casper community," adds Deanna Schaff, physical science division chair.

"We are extremely grateful to Mrs. Klaenhammer and her family for this generous gift for the earth sciences. We also are pleased that the State of Wyoming has matched this gift, dollar for dollar, through the Wyoming Community College Endowment Challenge Matching Program, and appreciate the vision and support of Wyoming's Legislature, says John Jorgensen, president of the Casper College Foundation Board.

Connely, now in her sixth year at Casper College, received her A.A. from Casper College in education, her B.S. from the University of Wyoming in geology and her M.S. from Utah State in geology.

 

Tuesday, September 11, 2007
WYOMING SHOULD INVEST IN PLANNING, UW SERIES SPEAKERS SAY

Wyoming will have to grit its teeth and go in for planning to deal with the rural sprawl that threatens to leave a far more permanent scar on Wyoming than energy development.

That's the message that two speakers, coming from the two different worlds of the Wyoming Business Council and the Wyoming Wildlife and Natural Resources Trust Fund, will deliver in Casper Thursday night. They'll kick off the free public lecture series sponsored by the University of Wyoming.

The event, free and open to the public, takes place from 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 13, in the Wheeler Auditorium, Room 103 of the Wold Physical Science Center on the Casper College campus.

The talks will launch the series "Delicate Networks: Wyoming's Land and Water and the Decisions Demanded by Growth," at the University of Wyoming/Casper College Center.

Energy industry impacts on Wyoming landscape and resources are "temporary - they'll last about 40 years," says Bob Budd, a former ranching industry leader who heads the Wyoming Wildlife and Natural Resources Trust Fund.

Residential development, however, has an impact that is essentially "permanent," Budd says. He will lead off the talks given Thursday evening.

"We should ask questions about what we're doing," Budd says.
The response to those questions is straightforward - planning, says Mark Willis, Chief Operating Officer of the Wyoming Business Council. He'll speak after Budd.

Willis' own experience as an economic development professional in Texas and Oklahoma, and his observations of the burgeoning cities of the southwest U.S., have convinced him of the importance of planning in dealing with residential sprawl.

"It's all about proper planning," Willis says.

"Economic development needs to be better planned and designed in order to have lesser impact on natural resources that are in limited supply," says Willis.

"Wyoming has a chance to do it right, where in most places we haven't," he says.

"Delicate Networks" examines the intricate water-land connections that sustain Wyoming's much-loved landscapes, and the ease with which development can disrupt those connections. It also explores how Wyoming people are seeking to protect those networks when dealing with development, especially residential growth.
Development issues affecting land and water in a number of communities including Casper, Buffalo, Cheyenne, Laramie, and Pinedale will be addressed by guest speakers from those communities and from the University of Wyoming. A UW/CC Center course, for undergraduate and graduate credit, is being offered in conjunction with the series.

The series is sponsored by UW's Helga and Otto Haub School and William Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources, the UW/CC Center, the UW Outreach School, and the Casper Star-Tribune.

For more information on the series, call the UW/CC Center at 268-2713.

 

Tuesday, September 11, 2007
T-BIRD SPIKERS FINALLY RETURN FOR HOME OPENER

After 3,000 miles and 20 matches, Casper College's volleyball team finally gets a chance to play at home.

While the home cooking might be nice, the T-Birds may not find the going much easier. Western Nebraska, the perennial champion from Region IX South, fills the dance card for the 7 p.m. match Tuesday night at Erickson Gymnasium. Admission is $3 for adults and $1 for students.

The match pits No. 5 vs. No. 6 in the preseason NJCAA polls. Since that poll came out, the T-Birds have taken their show to Idaho and Arizona, where they put together a respectable 13-7 match record. "We could have been better," says Angel Sharman, "and we easily could have gone 7-0 (in Arizona)."

Still, given the travel and the competition, Sharman says her T-Birds are right where she thought they would be - with one exception. Injuries have already taken a toll on Casper. Middle blocker Victoria Armstrong (Brule, Neb.) will have an MRI on her knee this week, and is out indefinitely. Katie Young, a freshman hitter from Natrona, also suffered a season-threatening knee injury.
Sharman announced that Nickole Strom, a defensive standout from Kelly Walsh, has joined the team and will suit for Tuesday's match.

"That lack of depth really took its toll (in Arizona)," Sharman says, adding that her team would only go through a light workout Monday to get ready for the home opener.

Savannah Searle, the freshman from Shelley, Idaho, continues to quarterback the T-Birds. She stepped into the setting role when Kari Tofte quit the team in August. Sharman says her hitters are still making the adjustment, but praised the work of Searle, who has averaged more than 10 assists per game.

Agata Dawidowicz, Julia Gruszecka, and Maja Jechorek continue to lead the way for Casper. The trio from Poland are all among the top hitters in Region IX. Vanessa Muir (Star Valley) and Bridget Neal (Gillette) will join those four in the starting rotation Tuesday night.

Western Nebraska brings a 12-1 record mark into the match.

 

Wednesday, September 5, 2007
“IN THE DISTANCE” FIRST SHOW OF SEASON AT GALLERY

“In the Distance” will feature the paintings of Lander artist Matt Flint through September 27 at the Goodstein Gallery in the Visual Arts Center at Casper College.

“My paintings are about isolation and transformation. I am influenced by my rural western surroundings and its history, says Flint, assistant instructor of art at Central Wyoming College in Riverton.

According to Flint, the imagery in his work consists of glyphs, abstracted plants, birds, horses, and heads that inhabit a “landscape” made up of simple geometric patterns. “This primitive geometry serves as a loose framework to organize, join, and simultaneously isolate the various subjects in the paintings,” he says.

“Rich textures and a subtle meditative light quality are created through the layering of paint and the struggle of the painting process. Through the accumulation of paint, action, and thought, my work evokes a meditative state that floats between the concrete and the temporal,” notes Flint, who received the 2007 Bobby Hathaway Jurors Choice Award and the Wyoming State Collection Purchase award at the Governors Capitol Art Exhibition.

In addition to the show, a lecture by Flint will be held on Monday, Sept. 10 beginning at noon in the Visual Arts Center, Room 102. Refreshments will be served.

TopBoth the show and lecture are free and open to the public. The Goodstein Gallery is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

 

Wednesday, September 5, 2007
“DESPERATE NEED” FOR BASIC MATH TUTORS

The Literacy Volunteers of Casper is in “desperate need” of tutors to teach adults basic math skills.

“We need volunteers who can assist our instructors as they teach adults basic math skills. These skills include teaching the very basics skills of adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing. We work through fraction, decimals, and percents primarily.  We needs tutors in our correctional programs primarily, but not exclusively,” says Lisa Mixer ABE/GED co-director and tutor coordinator.

Two tutor training workshops have been scheduled to meet all prospective tutor schedules: Wednesday, Sept., 19 from 10:30 a.m. to noon or on that same day from 6:30 to  8 p.m. The workshops will be held in the Werner Technical Center on the Casper College campus. “We are hoping to be able to fill a variety of scheduling needs during the day with these new tutors,” Mixer says.

For more information, or to preregister contact Mixer at 268-2453.

 

Wednesday, September 5, 2007
PROGRAM ALLOWS STUDENTS TO EARN GED ONLINE

A new program at Casper College allows students to earn their General Education Diploma (GED) or brush up on their Adult Basic Education (ABE) skills on line. Employers who have workers that need to learn basic skills are also encouraged to use the web-based program.

SkillsTutor is designed to help students work at their own pace, according to Rick Burgin, ABE/GED instructor at Casper College, and is a great program for those who are not only self-paced and independent learners, but also those who simply are not able to come to the Casper College ABE/GED Center on a regular basis.

SkillsTutor is designed to identify where each student needs help, provide each student customized lessons, test and monitor each student’s progress, and track each student’s performance.

In addition to students, ABE/GED Center’s SkillsTutor program can assist employers in increasing the literacy and basic skills of their employees. “I have had contractors call the center because their employee can’t do fractions for instance,” says Burgin. “Now with SkillsTutor we can help employers help their workers increase productivity, advance in their careers, and improve performance in their current jobs.”

Some of the basic skill areas covered by SkillsTutor include reading, basic and intermediate math, pre-algebra, science, social studies, information skills and workforce readiness.

Those wanting to use SkillsTutor will attend an orientation at the ABE/GED Center to learn how to use the program, take a pretest to determine learning needs, and visit with an advisor. Burgin will also make sure that each student’s system is compatible with SkillsTutor.

For more information call Casper College at 268-2372.

 

Tuesday, September 4, 2007
GENERATIONAL EXPERT TO PRESENT WORKSHOP

Generational expert Ginny Barnes will be at Casper College on Friday, Oct. 12 thanks to a partnership between Casper College and the Wyoming Business Council. Barnes will present a workshop on how to deal with Generation Y in the workplace.

“Guess Who’s Coming to the Workplace? Working with the Next Generations” is designed to help “anyone struggling to understand the different generations and how to work with them and those who would like to improve relationships in the workplace among the generations,” says Laura Driscoll, dean of continuing education and community partnerships at Casper College.

“I continue to hear from employers in the workplace who are struggling to keep their employees working together. This workshop will be focusing on Generation Y specifically because they are the newest generation coming or soon entering into the workforce,” notes Driscoll.

“We train employees in what we need but I think to retain qualified personnel it is important to know how to work with them as well,” adds Steve Elledge, Wyoming Business Council east central regional director.

Attendees will “discover solutions to generational challenges in the workplace, learn the seven core traits of Generation Y, examine the differences between Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y, and develop strategies to hire, train and integrate Generation Y into the workplace,” Driscoll says.

Barnes is an author, speaker, trainer and consultant who travels worldwide working with others on issues of leadership, planning, communications, negotiations, and conflict resolution. She is currently involved in generational research for planning and organizational purposes for schools, churches and businesses. Barnes is the author of “Eight Steps to Effective Negotiations: Letting the Other Person have YOUR Way.” Her company, G.B. Communications Inc., is located in Columbia, Mo. where Barnes conducts her consulting and training practice, while teaching for the university.

The cost to attend “Guess Who’s Coming to the Workplace? Working with the Next Generations” is $165 per person and includes lunch. The workshop will run from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Roberts Commons Ballroom located on the Casper College campus.

Natrona County School District teachers can apply for .5 credits from the Professional Teachers Standards Board Committee. In addition through a BOCES grant, all Natrona County School District, Casper College and University of Wyoming/Casper College Center employees are eligible to apply for a limited number of scholarships to attend the workshop for free.

The deadline for the BOCES scholarship is Wednesday, Sept. 19. To apply for a grant or signup for the workshop, call the college at 268-2099 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu/success.

 

Tuesday, September 4, 2007
BOCES, NCSD CONTINUE PARTNERSHIP WITH UW/CC

The Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) and the Natrona County School District (NCSD) recently voted to continue their support of the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center's secondary science education and technical education programs for another three years.

The partnership between BOCES, NCSD, and the UW/CC Center extends back to 1990, when BOCES first began funding the elementary education program. The support for this program continued until 2003, when the program grew large enough so that funds were no longer needed.

The BOCES' funding has been instrumental in bringing the new education programs to Casper. Since 2001, BOCES has assisted with funding for the technical education program; the secondary science education funding began in 2005. These funds help to support faculty salaries and benefits, purchase laboratory equipment, and purchase machines and tools. BOCES supports about 75 percent of the total cost for the technical education program, and 100 percent of the secondary science education program.

Over the past three years, the UW/CC Center has graduated about one-sixth of the UW College of Education graduates. The proportion is likely to rise, when students from the counseling, technical education, and secondary science education programs graduate in May 2008, said Brent Pickett, associate dean and director of the UW/CC Center.

"We are fortunate that UW has good degree programs to offer, and BOCES has made it possible to bring these programs to Casper through the UW/CC Center," said Pickett. "BOCES has played a vital role in expanding the higher education degree programs available for the citizens of central Wyoming."

According to Joel Dvorak, associate superintendent for curriculum and instruction for Natrona County schools, the partnership between the UW/CC Center, BOCES, and NCSD makes a lot of sense.

"The partnership is continuing to flourish, and BOCES plays a large role in making that happen," said Dvorak. "I hope the partnership continues to grow, and that the provided seed money continues to grow programs to fuel innovation and education in Natrona County."

TopFor more information on education programs offered through the UW/CC Center, call 268-2713 or visit www.uwyo.edu/uwcc.

Thursday, October 25, 2007
ENERGY IMPACTS ON WATER & TROUT TOPIC OF UW TALKS IN CASPER NOV. 1

How Wyoming people are taking action to deal with the impacts of energy development on the state's scarce water resources will be the topic of talks in Casper on Thursday evening, Nov. 1.

A local company's plans for coal bed methane water in the new Atlantic Rim field in Carbon County, and Wyoming labor union members' work to protect trout streams and wildlife habitat in the Wyoming Range from conventional oil and gas drilling will be addressed by two speakers that night in the University of Wyoming's free lecture series in Casper.

"Pursuing Energy" will be the fifth evening in the series "Delicate Networks: Wyoming's Land and Water and the Decisions Demanded by Growth," at the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center.

The event, free and open to the public, takes place at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 1, in the Wheeler Auditorium, Room 103 of the Wold Physical Science Center on the Casper College campus.

Steve Hollis, president and chief executive officer of Double Eagle Petroleum Co. in Casper, will discuss what his company has learned from industry experience with coal bed methane (CBM) in the Powder River Basin, and what Double Eagle now hopes to do to be able to treat and find uses for water produced from coal bed methane wells in the new Atlantic Rim project southwest of Rawlins.

Water produced from CBM wells in the Powder River Basin and discharged on the surface has been controversial, and has caused problems in some places. The majority owners in the Atlantic Rim project, and the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM), expect almost all the project's CBM water to be re-injected underground.

Hollis, however, believes that in the Atlantic Rim, after applying what's been learned further north, "If you pay attention, you can actually do it right, and do everybody some good" in making more water available on the surface for local use.

Kim Floyd, director of the Wyoming AFL-CIO, will discuss Thursday his group's serious concerns with the BLM's action approving the Atlantic Rim project. The BLM's decision is the target of heavy criticism and lawsuits because the agency's environmental analysis recognized the project will turn currently significant wildlife habitat into an essentially industrial area, but explicitly stated the project should nonetheless go ahead due to national energy needs.

Floyd represents labor union members who hunt and fish and have become increasingly involved in issues regarding energy development and fish and wildlife habitat. He will also discuss how and why citizens across the state have been galvanized into the effort of Sportsmen for the Wyoming Range seeking suspension of new oil and gas leasing and buy-back of existing leases that could lead to production affecting fish and wildlife habitat. The Sportsmen's group has had considerable success so far drawing attention to the issue and winning the support of Gov. Dave Freudenthal for the buy-back concept, which has been used in other states.

UW's "Delicate Networks" series examines the intricate water-land connections that sustain Wyoming's much-loved landscapes, and the ease with which development can disrupt those connections. It also explores how Wyoming people are seeking to protect those networks when dealing with development, especially residential growth.

Development issues affecting land and water in a number of communities including Casper, Buffalo, Cheyenne, Laramie, and Pinedale will be addressed by guest speakers from those communities and from the University of Wyoming.

The series is sponsored by UW's Helga Otto Haub School and William Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources, the UW/CC Center, the UW Outreach School, and the Casper Star-Tribune.

 

Friday, October 19, 2007
X-RAYS FOR TREATS, HAUNTED HOUSE, SHIP, GHOUL PHOTO AND CARNIVAL SET FOR HALLOWEEN FUN

The Casper College Health Sciences Division will again present a spooky night of X-rayed Halloween treats, a haunted house, haunted ship, Halloween carnival, ghoul, and prizes and treats for all ages that visit the Saunders Health Science Center at Casper College on Halloween night.

Everyone attending is asked to bring a nonperishable food item for entrance to the haunted house. “Of course if people do not have one they can still come in,” notes Laurie Weaver. All collected food items will then be given to a local food pantry. Those attending the haunted house can also have their photo taken with a ghoul for just $1.

“During the night, the Casper College Student Radiography Association and radiography faculty will X-ray Halloween treats,” says Weaver, chair of the radiology department at Casper College. “We will be handing out goodies and prizes to all the children and they will get to keep the X-ray of their candy,” she says. Children will also be able to watch the radiography students X-ray their candy and help develop the film in the darkroom, according to Weaver.

X-rays will show most metallic objects. Parents are cautioned, however, to inspect all the treats, since X-rays cannot detect the presence of chemical substances or nonmetallic objects such as glass.

The Casper College Student Nurses’ Association will be hosting the haunted house for older children and adults. “The haunted house is geared for those who can handle scary stuff,” Weaver says.

The student associations for the occupational therapy assistant, pharmacy technology and respiratory therapy programs will present the haunted ship and Halloween carnival, which are geared toward kids two and up. “Since the haunted house is pretty scary and geared toward older kids the ship is a great thing for the younger ones. Children will receive a passport when they begin their journey through the carnival and at each activity they will receive a sticker to place on their passport. At the end of their carnival journey they can use the passport to enter the haunted ship for more games and fun,” says Weaver.

The Halloween fun will take place throughout the Saunders Health Science Center from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

 

Friday, October 19, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE OPENS NEW LAB TO IMPROVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS

The Casper College Communications Department will hold a grand opening on Wednesday, Oct. 31 for its newest offering: The Casper College Oral Communications Lab (OC).

"The communications faculty had a number of catalysts that got this idea going over the years," says Gretchen Wheeler, communication and forensics instructor at Casper College. "What cinched it for the department was the hiring of Bill Sheffield, and attending a conference about oral communication labs and centers across the nation."

"With the hiring of Bill we now have six communications instructors which ensures that we can properly staff the lab," Wheeler notes. And the conference, "gave us additional information we were able to use on how to implement and run a communications lab," she adds.

The theme for the open house "What Can be Scarier than a Public Presentation? Nothing!" ties in with not only Halloween but with studies that show that people "consistently rank public speaking among their worst fears - more frightening than snakes, spiders, even death," says Wheeler.

"Everybody feels speech anxiety to some degree. The OC is the fix and the way to overcome it. It can also help those who don't fear public speaking become a better public speaker," Wheeler notes.

Gift certificates for the downtown movie theatres, area restaurants, coffee houses, and the Casper College Bookstore will be awarded.

"Community members should feel comfortable about using this lab - it is open for them as well as the students," says Wheeler. Private mentoring will also be available for help with presentation skills.

The open house will run from 3 to 5 p.m. in the OC located in Room 154 of the Gertrude Krampert Theatre. At 3 p.m. Casper College President Walter Nolte will cut a ribbon to officially open the lab.

The OC will be open Thursdays from 3 to 7 p.m., Fridays from noon to 3 p.m., Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon and by appointment.

TopFor more information call Casper College at 268-2100 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Friday, October 19, 2007
"ECLECTIC" CONCERT PROMISES SOMETHING FOR ALL

Calling the next Casper College Concert Band Concert “eclectic” director Doug Bull has prepared a concert that should appeal to listeners of all ages. The free concert is set to begin at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 28 in Durham Hall, located in the Aley Fine Arts Center.

The concert will feature not only the concert band but the Casper College Brass Ensemble which will begin the show with Moussorsky’s “Gopak,” William Byrd’s ‘’Round About Her Charret,” and other selections.

The concert band will perform Resphigi’s “Pines Of The Appian Way,” Brian Balmages’ “Summer Dances,” Clifton William’s “Dedicatory Overture,” Naohiro Awai’s “Jungle Fantasy,” Frank Erickson’s “Festive Winds,” and Stephen Bulla’s “Rhapsody For Flute” featuring sophomore music major Mary McNally on flute.

 

Friday, October 19, 2007
HEALTH SCIENCES OPEN HOUSE SET FOR NOVEMBER

The Casper College Health Sciences Division is inviting community members to an open house celebration on Friday, Nov. 2 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

"We are holding this open house to spotlight the various programs in the Saunders Health Science Center," says Sheri Roumell, pharmacy technology program director. Currently there are six health-related programs in the health science division: nursing, radiography, respiratory therapy, occupational therapy assistant, pharmacy technology, and activities professional.

Each department will have a different "food station." "After participants have visited each department, they will have gotten a full lunch. We will have appetizers, a sandwich station, desert, punch and tea available during the open house," says Roumell.

As visitors go through the Saunders Health Science Center, department members will be on hand to answer questions and provide mini tours of each program's area. Demonstrations and fun activities are also planned in each of the departments.

All activities will take place in the Saunders Health Science Center. For more information, call the college at 268-2372.

 

 

Thursday, October 18, 2007
THIRD ANNUAL BIG BAND DINNER DANCE SET

Tickets are now on sale for Casper College’s 3rd Annual “Strike up the Band,” big band dinner dance to be held on Saturday, Nov. 10 in the Grand Ballroom at the Parkway Plaza.

“‘Strike up the Band’ will really have the feeling of those dinner/dance clubs that existed back during the 30s, 40s and 50s,” says Bob Kleinschmidt, Casper College woodwind instructor and director of the Casper College Jazz Ensemble.
The jazz ensemble will perform some of the most memorable dance numbers from the 30s, 40s and 50s, including tunes made popular by Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, the Dorsey brothers and others. The Casper College Reading Band will also sit in with the ensemble during the evening.

A buffet dinner will begin at 6 p.m. A cash bar will also be available. Dancing will begin at 7 p.m.

Tickets are $35 per individual or $50 per couple. For those wishing to dance only, tickets are $15 per person. Reservations must be made by Wednesday, Nov. 7 by calling the Casper College Music Department at 268-2021, or toll free 800-442-2963, ext. 2021.

 

Thursday, October 18, 2007
TATE SEEKS OLD AND NEW VOLUNTEERS

The Casper College Tate Geological Museum will be holding an open house for volunteers on Friday, Oct. 19 from 5 to 8 p.m.

Melissa Connely, interim director of the Tate, came up with the idea as a way to help increase the pool of Tate volunteers.

“There are a lot of folks out there who used to volunteer, who currently volunteer or who have thought about volunteering. This open house is for all of them,” says Connely.
“I would really like to have some feedback from people about the Tate; their ideas and their inspiration,” Connely notes.

TopDuring the evening food and refreshments will be available, prizes will be given away, and special tours will be available. The open house is free to all.

 

Wednesday, October 17, 2007
LYNNE CHENEY TO SPEAK, SIGN BOOKS AT CASPER COLLEGE

Lynne Cheney will be on the Casper College campus on Saturday, Oct. 27 at 11 a.m. to speak about and then sign copies of her new book “Blue Skies, No Fences: A Memoir of Childhood and Family.”

“Cheney's memoir of her childhood in Casper, Wyoming, is a captivating amalgam of genealogy and gems of 1950s memorabilia that will bring smiles of recognition to readers of her generation,” according to Deborah Donovan in Booklist.

Cheney, the wife of Vice President Dick Cheney, is the successful author of the bestselling children’s books “Our 50 States: A Family Adventure Across America,” “America: A Patriotic Primer,” “When Washington Crossed the Delaware: A Wintertime Story for Young Patriots,” and others.

Copies of “Blue Skies, No Fences” are available at the Casper College Bookstore and will be available during the event at the Krampert Theatre box office. Ten percent of the sale price of the book will be donated to the Western History Center at Casper College.

Cheney frequently uses the Western History Center for research, and most recently spent time there gathering information for “Blue Skies, No Fences.” The money received from the book sales will be used to help purchase a large format scanner, according to Kevin Anderson, Western History Center Archivist.

The free presentation will take place on the McMurry Mainstage, while the book signing will be held immediately following in the lobby of the Gertrude Krampert Theatre.

 

Tuesday, October 16, 2007
SEATS STILL AVAILABLE TO HEAR NATIONALLY-RECOGNIZED EXPERT

Seats are still available at the next Professional Success Series at Casper College on Friday, Oct. 12.

Nationally recognized generational expert Ginny Barnes will be at the college to present a workshop from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The workshop, “Guess Who’s Coming to the Workplace? Working with the Next Generations” will show attendees how to “discover solutions to generational challenges in the workplace, learn the seven core traits of Generation Y, examine the differences between Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y, and develop strategies to hire, train and integrate Generation Y into the workplace,” says Laura Driscoll, dean of continuing education and community partnerships at Casper College.

Barnes is an author, speaker, trainer and consultant who travels worldwide working with others on issues of leadership, planning, communications, negotiations, and conflict resolution. She is currently involved in generational research for planning and organizational purposes for schools, churches and businesses. Barnes is the author of “Eight Steps to Effective Negotiations: Letting the Other Person have YOUR Way.” Her company, G.B. Communications Inc., is located in Columbia, Mo. where Barnes conducts her consulting and training practice, while teaching for the university.

“Guess Who’s Coming to the Workplace? Working with the Next Generations,” is sponsored by Casper College and the Wyoming Business Council. Cost to attend is $165 per person and includes lunch. The workshop will be held in the Roberts Commons Ballroom located on the Casper College campus.

To sign up for the workshop, call the college at 268-2099 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu/success.

 

Monday, October 15, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE ALUMNI NAME SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS

The Casper College Alumni Association has released the names of its winners for the Casper College Alumni Association Outstanding Student Scholarship.

One nontraditional and one traditional student were awarded a scholarship for the 2007-2008 school year.

Monique Peterson-Brown received the nontraditional scholarship worth $1,000. A single mother of four, Peterson-Brown decided to return to college after a 20-year hiatus. "I started down the pathway for a degree in psychology right out of high school, ...but the responsibilities of life seemed to push it aside."

Joshua Johnson received the traditional scholarship worth $3,000. A 2007 graduate of Cheylin High School in McDonald, Kan., Johnson is a freshman agriculture major and a member of the Casper College Livestock Judging Team.

A recipient of numerous scholastic awards during high school, Johnson was also involved in band, football, weight lifting, student government, FCCLA, FFA, 4-H and the Catholic Youth Organization while in high school.

"I have worked hard throughout my high school years to be successful not only in high school but also in my future. I not only want to receive my associate's degree, but be a unique student within the program and a very active and proficient member of the livestock judging team," says Johnson.

According to Linda Nix, alumni coordinator, academic achievement is the highest selection criterion for the scholarship, but community involvement and financial need are also taken into consideration.

For more information about the Casper College Alumni Association Outstanding Student Scholarship and other scholarships available at Casper College log on to www.caspercollege.edu.

 

Friday, October 12, 2007
UW/CC TO BEGIN NEW COUNSELING COHORT

The University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center will be hosting an informational session about the master's degree program in counseling on Oct. 20 from 1-3 p.m. at the UW Outreach Building Room 150, 951 N. Poplar in Casper. A new cohort will begin in the fall of 2008. Designed to prepare professional counselors and educators for entry into school and community settings, the three-year program will not open for enrollments again until 2011.

"Students who graduate from the UW Counselor Education program not only develop the skills and knowledge necessary to become licensed professional counselors, they also develop a greater sense of who they are as individuals," said Deborah McGriff, coordinator of the Casper counseling cohort program. "The structure of the cohort program allows the students to build lasting friendships and professional relationships with peers and with the UW faculty. The job market for counselors is promising, as the demand for professional counselors is expected to continue to grow through 2014."

The deadline to apply for the counseling program is Jan. 15. For more information, Topcontact the UW/CC Center at 307-268-2713, 1-877-264-9930, or visit www.uwyo.edu/uwcc.

 

Wednesday, October 10, 2007
DONATION PROVIDES NEWEST DIESEL TECHNOLOGY FOR STUDENTS

A unique partnership between Dixon Bros, Inc., Cummins Factory & Cummins Rocky Mountain LLC has resulted in the donation of a Cummins ISX Signature Series training engine to the Casper College Diesel Power Technology program.

"The diesel power technology program needs to always stay up-to-date with new industry developments. This donation will help us to do just that for many years to come," says Harold Wright, diesel instructor at Casper College. "This is the latest in diesel engine technology designed to meet government emissions regulations," Wright adds.

"The nice thing about this engine is, with very minor changes, it will be within the 2010 EPA certifications. The 2004-2010 engine is basically the same," notes Jim Dixon, CEO of Dixon Brothers.

Dixon Brothers is no stranger to Casper College. The Dixon family has been sending sons and daughters to the school for a number of years. Son Jimmy received his diesel power technology certificate at Casper College in 1983. Jimmy's sons Austin and Joe also received that same certificate at Casper College in 2003 and 2007 respectively.

"Jimmy and I were in a discussion about Casper College not having a newer Cummins engine for students to work on when Joe was there this past spring. Harold told us that he had not been able to secure a current Cummins model. I told Jimmy to lean on our Cummins representative and get the ball rolling," says Dixon.

Jimmy approached Wayne Lepine with Rocky Mountain Cummins in Gillette. "Wayne took it from there and worked through the channels," Jimmy says. The result was the receipt of an in-service engine removed from service to be used as a training engine.

"We got the ball rolling on this because Casper College has been a big asset for us. We have a lot of folks out of Casper College that work for us and two that went this year," Dixon says. "Most places just touch on the mechanic part but Casper College touches on everything. CC deserves ours and Cummins support - they turn out a good product, it's an excellent school."

 

Donation

The Diesel Power Technology program at Casper College recently received a Cummins ISX Signature Series training engine. Dixon Brothers, Inc. in Newcastle, Cummins Factory in Columbus, Ind., and Cummins Rocky Mountain LLC in Gillette donated the engine to the college. Harold Wright, diesel power instructor at Casper College (second from left) traveled to Newcastle to pick up the engine from Jimmy and Jim Dixon, both of Dixon Brothers and Wayne Lepine (far right) with Cummins Rocky Mountain LLC.
(Casper College photo by Lisa S. Icenogle.)

 

 

Wednesday, October 10, 2007
MADRIGAL FEASTE TICKETS GO ON SALE OCTOBER 16

Tickets for the 13th Annual Casper College Madrigal Feaste will go on sale on Tuesday, Oct. 16 beginning at 8 a.m. in the main lobby of the Gertrude Krampert Theatre.

"Sales will begin promptly at 8 a.m. and will end at 10," says Deanna Dyer, fine arts division academic assistant.

The tickets are $40 per person, with $20 of that amount as a tax-deductible donation to the Casper College Fine Arts Endowment. "The endowment allows the fine arts department to bring in arts educators, performers and exhibitors to further enhance the educational opportunities for our students," Dyer says.

This year's feast will be held November 29-30, and December 1 and 5-8 in the Black Box Theatre, located in the Gertrude Krampert Theatre Complex on the Casper College campus.
Tickets will also be available for what is known as the "First Knight." Tickets for the First Knight, which is the dress rehearsal, are $25 each.

The three-hour medieval dinner theatre is actually interactive, as the audience will be guests of the royal court and will be served a several course meal by wenches and knaves. In addition to the meal, the feast will feature grand processionals, brass fanfares, food presentations by the Royal Cook, jugglers, mimes, singers, instrumentalists and play-actors.

The feast features the Casper College Collegiate Chorale, Men's and Women's Choirs, and the Contemporary Singers, all under the direction of Patrick Patton, vocal instructor and choir director at Casper College.

Dyer notes that last year tickets were sold out by 8:45 a.m., and tickets have sold out far in advance of the event for the last six years in a row.

 

Monday, October 8, 2007
WERNER WILDLIFE FALL HOURS ANNOUNCED

Casper College has announced new fall hours for the Werner Wildlife Museum.

The museum will be open on Monday from noon to 3 p.m., from 2 to 5 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday and Friday evening from 5 to 8. The museum will be closed on Wednesday.

According to Sarah Sulzen, Casper College academic assistant, the Werner Wildlife Museum is home to a variety of “vertebrate wildlife indigenous to Wyoming including fish, amphibians, and reptiles, as well as birds and mammals.”
The museum also has on display a number of other animal specimens from Asia, Malaysia, Africa, Europe and others.

TopAdmission is free for all and Sulzen notes that tours are available by appointment by calling the museum at 235-2108.

 

Monday, October 8, 2007
COLLEGE ANNOUNCES OCTOBER MEETING TIMES

The Casper College District Board of Trustees will hold its October board meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 16 beginning at 7 p.m. in the Strausner Student Center, Room 217.

Prior to the board meeting the board will hold its work session and finance meeting from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Strausner Student Center, Room 207.

All meeting minutes and schedules for the board are available on the Casper College Web site at www.caspercollege.edu/community.

Both meetings are open and the public is invited to attend.

 

Monday, October 8, 2007
THREE MOVEMENT “GLORIA” PART OF AUTUMN CONCERT LINEUP

The three movement work, “Gloria” written by John Rutter for choir, soloists, and brass ensemble including percussion and organ will be part of this year’s Casper College Autumn Concert on Sunday, Oct. 14 at 2 p.m. at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church.

According to Patrick Patton, director, several instructors from the music department at Casper College have helped in the preparation of “Gloria,” which will be performed by the Casper College Collegiate Chorale. Doug Bull prepared the brasses, while Terry Gunderson worked with the percussionists. Eric Unruh, fine arts division chair, will play organ during “Gloria.” “The level of collaboration within our department and division continues to be excellent,” notes Patton.

Patton’s three other vocal groups will perform at the concert as well. “The Women's Choir will perform pieces by contemporary composers Snyder and Stroope. A feature work is a selection commissioned by the American Choral Director’s Association for the National Women’s Honor Choir in Chicago.  It is entitled “i thank you god,” poetry by e.e.cummings and music by Gwyneth Walker,” says Patton.

As usual, the Men’s Choir will perform a mixed selection of what Patton calls “fun pieces for guys.” “We do this every year so we have a repertoire we can take into the community for performances at service clubs, organizations and special events. It will include repertoire from the barbershop collection, 50’s do-wop, a selection from the musical theatre genre, and maybe even a country tune or two,” he says.

The Casper College Contemporary Singers will round out the concert with new arrangements from the vocal jazz repertoire recently presented at the Soundsation Jazz Camp. “The selections are arranged especially for the camp and the Contemporary Singers will present the premiere performances in Wyoming at this concert,” notes Patton who serves, along with his son John, as faculty at the camp.

A free-will offering will be accepted at the door. “One hundred percent of donations received are returned to the students involved in the choral music program for the furthering of their musical education at Casper College,” Patton says.

 

Thursday, October 4, 2007
SPEAKER TO DISCUSS FAMOUS WYOMING WOMEN WRITERS

Two women ranchers whose writing shaped the nation’s image of Wyoming will be the topic of a free discussion entitled “Power Laced in Petticoats: Wyoming’s Caroline Lockhart and Mary O’Hara” on Tuesday, Oct. 9 at Casper College.

Mary O’Hara author of “My Friend Flicka,” “Thunderhead,” and “Wyoming Summer,” lived on the Remount Ranch located between Cheyenne and Laramie from 1938 to 1968. Caroline Lockhart author of “The Lady Doc,” “Fighting Shepherdess,” and “The Full Moon,” moved to Cody in 1905 where she held her own in the male world of publishing and ranching.

Presenter Melanie Francis, who lives in Laramie, received a master’s in English and women’s studies from University of Wyoming. She teaches English and humanities at Laramie County Community College and often lectures on Wyoming women and Wyoming architecture.

“Power Laced in Petticoats: Wyoming’s Caroline Lockhart and Mary O’Hara” is presented by the Wyoming Humanities Council and sponsored by the Casper College Department of Women’s Studies and the Casper College Career Center. The presentation is the second in a series called “It’s All Women’s Work.”

The free presentation will begin at 7 p.m. in the Black Box Theatre located on the southeast side of the Gertrude Krampert Theatre on the Casper College campus.

Francis’s presentation is offered by the Wyoming Humanities Council through its 2007 Humanities Forum. Council programs explore the human experience – our lives, our communities, our world – in partnership with nonprofit organizations throughout Wyoming. Emphasis is placed on fostering forums for discussion among Wyoming residents.

Major funding for the council comes from the National Endowment for the Humanities and private contributions.

 

Wednesday, October 3, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE ANNOUNCES LARGE GIFT
Central Wyoming Hospice Program Also Benefits

Casper College Officials announced today that the college has received one of the largest monetary gifts in the school’s history of $1,810,492 from the Jack McCann estate.

At the same press conference, officials from the Central Wyoming Hospice also announced the receipt of $95,289 from the same estate.

“This extremely generous donation allows us to get started with implementing the long-term campus master plan that was developed for Casper College,” says Walter Nolte, president.

“We are delighted to receive this generous gift,” says Paul Hallock, executive director of the Casper College Foundation. “With this gift we look forward to using it in a way that will benefit our students and this community over the long term.”

“We are so happy to receive this generous gift from the McCann Estate. Each and every donation brings us closer to realizing our dream of a second inpatient hospice facility. With this contribution, along with the generosity of all of our donors, we have raised nearly half of the necessary funds needed for our building expansion,” says Paula Mongold, public relations coordinator for the Central Wyoming Hospice Program.

McCann was well known in the Casper community as “Jack McCann the Diamond Man” and owned and operated McCann’s Jewelers as well as other businesses in Casper and Las Vegas. He passed away at age 86 on March 9, 2006.

“Jack had a very real appreciation for both Casper College and the ongoing care provided by Central Wyoming Hospice Program, and that shows with the two generous gifts received today from his estate,” notes Hallock.

 

Wednesday, October 3, 2007
ROAD WEARY T-BIRDS LOOK FORWARD TO HOME MATCH THURSDAY
The Casper College volleyball team paid its dues.

After logging thousands of miles and playing 33 of their first 34 matches on the road, the T-Birds will finally reap some rewards. The early season schedule took them away from home, but that means the late season schedule will find them at home. Six of their last eight matches will be at Thunderbird Gymnasium, beginning Thursday night at 7 when they host Laramie County Community College. Central Wyoming College comes to town Saturday for a 7 p.m. match.

Coach Angel Sharman, who watched her CC team fall to 21-15 with a loss to No. 1 ranked Western Nebraska on Tuesday, hopes her team can get healthy and develop some momentum in October.

The T-Birds played without their outstanding left-side hitter Julia Gruszecka on Tuesday. Gruszecka, who is among the top 20 hitters in Region IX, injured an ankle over the weekend and may not play until Saturday.

Despite the loss Tuesday at Scottsbluff, the T-Birds have put themselves in excellent position in the North Division and in Wyoming Conference play. Casper has wins over Laramie County, Eastern Wyoming, Sheridan and Northwest on the road. The only road trips remaining on the schedule are Western Wyoming and Central Wyoming.

Sharman says she expected a tough match Tuesday, but adds, “We want to win the Topregion, but I want them to step it up against good teams. This team is very quiet, and I want them to communicate better on the floor.”

Friday, November 30, 2007
HONOR SOCIETY RAISES FUNDS FOR JOSHUA'S STOREHOUSE

The Round Table Honor Society at the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center is selling raffle tickets for the chance to win a new snow blower.

Valued at $700, the snow blower was donated by Elmer Pace of Dayton Transmission and Chad Nelson of Nelico Equipment in Casper. Proceeds from the raffle tickets will benefit Joshua's Storehouse, and will be used to purchase gifts for children, adults, and elderly persons in need.

Raffle tickets are available for $5 each or 5 for $20, and can be purchased at various schools in the district, from a Round Table Honor Society member, at Smith's grocery store, at the Elks Lodge, Rotary Club, or through the UW/CC Center's main office. The deadline to enter the drawing is December 9, and the winner will be announced on December 11.

"We all know the homeless community is getting larger in Wyoming and in Casper," said Alana Sheffield, a senior in the elementary education program at the UW/CC Center and president of the honor society. "We are doing what we can to support the people who are helping them."

Sheffield organized the holiday project with Round Table treasurer Natalie Pique, a senior in the psychology program at the UW/CC Center, and Annette Green, a senior in the elementary education program and a member of the honor society.

For more information, or to purchase raffle tickets, contact the UW/CC Center main office at 268-2713 or toll-free at 1-877-264-9930.

 

Tuesday, November 27, 2007
ANNUAL TWO-DAY STUDENT HOLIDAY ART SALE SET

Casper College art students will be holding a fund-raising art sale on Friday, Nov. 30 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 1 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Casper College Visual Arts Center.

The sale, sponsored by the Casper College Art Club and Ceramics Department, will feature student created art including jewelry, photographs, paintings, sculptures, ceramics, and prints.

"This is really a major fund raiser not only for the art club and the ceramics department but also for many of our students," says Mike Olson, ceramics instructor at Casper College. While some students donate their work, most students use the sale to earn money. "For a lot of our students, this is how they pay for some of the costs of going to college," Olson notes.

Students will receive 70 percent of each of their item's sales price. The remaining 30 percent will go toward the visiting artist program in the ceramics department at Casper College. The program brings in guest artists for both talks and demonstrations for students in the Visual Arts Center.

The Casper College Annual Student Holiday and Remainder Ceramic Sale will be held in the ceramics studio, Room 110, and refreshments will be served.

 

Tuesday, November 27, 2007
AUSSIE VOCAL GROUP HEADLINES 2008 JAZZ FESTIVAL

Next year's 41st Annual Casper College Kinser Jazz Festival will feature the four-member Australian a cappella group The Idea of North. The group will perform in concert on Tuesday, Feb. 5 at 7:30 p.m. in the John F. Welsh Auditorium.

The Idea of North first formed in 1993 more as a pastime then a career for the members. An unexpectedly enthusiastic response to their 1997 debut CD, some professional gig requests, and an invitation to an international jazz festival prompted the decision to commit to The Idea Of North on a full-time basis in 1998.

Official recognition of their international appeal came in 2003 when they won The Harmony Sweepstakes - the largest international open a cappella competition in the world. The Idea of North was the first non-US group to win the prestigious award in its 20-year history. At the same competition they also received the ‘audience favorite' and ‘best arrangement' awards.

"We are thrilled to have this a cappella group come to Casper," says Robert Kleinschmidt, executive director of the Kinser Jazz Festival. "I believe that concert goers will love their distinctive sound and the way that they are able to sing in a variety of musical genres including jazz, gospel, folk, classical, pop and others," he adds.

While they continue to produce many award winning recordings, this is a group that is best seen live to appreciate their passion for music and ability to connect with their audience. As World renowned Jazz artist James Morrison so aptly put it: "A cappella is sometimes thought of as being minimalist, but when you can sing and entertain like The Idea of North, a band would just get in the way."

Tickets for the concert are now on sale for $15 and can be purchased by calling the Casper College Music Department at 268-2021, toll free 800-442-2963, ext. 2021, or online at www.caspercollege.edu/jazz.

 

Tuesday, November 27, 2007
CC FRENCH CLUB HOLDS RUMMAGE SALE FUNDRAISER

The Casper College French Club will be holding a rummage sale on Saturday, Dec. 1 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Roberts Commons Ballroom.

The club is taking donations of items to sell, and also selling tables to individuals at $3 a table. "Those who purchase tables are responsible for pricing their items, setting up, tearing down and hauling off what doesn't sell. Profits from their tables are theirs to keep," says Laura Hittle, Casper College world languages instructor and French Club sponsor.

Money raised by the French Club will be used to help pay for the club's spring trip to Montreal.

TopTo donate items or purchase a table call Hittle at 268-2083.

 

Tuesday, November 20, 2007
SANTASAURUS PART OF HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE AT TATE MUSEUM
 
Santasaurus will be roaming the Tate Geological Museum at Casper College during the museum's Holiday Open House on Saturday, Dec. 1 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The open house will include refreshments, pictures with Santasaurus for just $2 each between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., and special discounts in the gift shop with 15 percent savings for nonmembers and 25 percent savings for museum members, volunteers, Casper College and the University of Wyoming/Casper College students and employees with I.D.

According to Rachel Savage, museum webmaster, the museum is full of new products including dinosaur baseball caps, Triops Kits, mugs with T-Rex, dinosaur Christmas ornaments, collectible dinosaur toys from Carnegie and Schleich, the new book and wall map "Crusin' the Fossil Freeway," as well as the ever popular stuffed-toy dinosaurs and puppets.

In addition to Santasaurus, the open house will feature a dinosaur ornament workshop, scavenger hunt, a Christmas tree to decorate, tours of the prep lab with recent finds available for viewing, and door prize drawings. Raffle tickets will also be sold for a beautiful Denver Broncos metal art piece, which will be drawn for at the Tate's March 15, 2008 fundraiser.

Refreshments will be served and all events and activities are free and open to the public, with the exception of photos with Santasaurus. All proceeds from the Santasaurus photos and raffle ticket sales will go to funding of the Tate.

For more information call the Tate Geological Museum at 268-2447.

 

Friday, November 16, 2007
POPULAR CHOCOLATE CALENDARS NOW AVAILABLE AT COLLEGE

The Casper College National Collegiate Foreign Language Honorary, Alpha Mu Gamma and the Casper College French Club are selling the popular Original Schubert Advent Calendars through November, while supplies last.

Imported from Germany, the calendars cost only $3.50 each. "Per German custom, the calendars have two traditional, quaint holiday themes to choose from, with a piece of German milk chocolate tucked behind each day's window," says Lora Hittle, world languages instructor and faculty advisor for both groups.

"Money earned from the sale of the calendars will go toward funding Alpha Mu Gamma and French Club student projects at Casper College," says Hittle. "The popular calendars are a hit each year, and sell quickly," she adds.

Calendars are available, cash only, by calling Hittle at 268-2083.

 

Friday, November 16, 2007
CASPER COLLEGE CLASS TO HELP SENIORS LEARN THE INTERNET

Through the Continuing Education Department at Casper College seniors are being offered the opportunity to learn about the Internet.

The hands-on class, "Introduction to the Internet," CEU 1062, will explore the many types of information now available on the Internet.

"Students will learn about basic browser navigation, search engine techniques, terminology, e-mail, browser configuration settings, bookmark management, folder creation, advanced searches, spam, cookies, and file downloading," says Jan Burnett, instructor.

The month-long class will be held every Monday beginning Nov. 26 and run from 1 to 3 p.m. or 3 to 5 p.m. at the Senior Citizen's Center located at 1831 E. 4th Street.

According to Burnett students should purchase the book "The Internet," 6th edition from the Casper College Bookstore, before the first class.

To register for "Introduction to the Internet" call Casper College at 268-2207.

 

Friday, November 9, 2007
AUTHOR AND CRITIC OF RADICAL ISLAM TO SPEAK AT CASPER COLLEGE

Nonie Darwish, author of "Now They Call Me Infidel: Why I Renounced Jihad for America, Israel, and the War on Terror," will speak at Casper College on Thursday, Nov. 15 at noon in Durham Hall.

Prior to a speech she made at the University of California at Berkley on October 22, 2007, Darwish told reporters, "Somebody from our side, from the Arab America side has to speak and say ‘those people (radical Muslims) want to sabotage the system in American.' We have to stand and say enough is enough."

Born in Cairo, Darwish was later raised in the Gaza Strip. In the 1950s, Egypt occupied Gaza and Gamal Abdel Nasser, who later became Egypt's president, appointed her father to lead the Fedayeen guerilla operations, whose sole mission was to destroy Israel. As Nasser rallied the Arab world to wipe out the Jewish State, Arabs throughout the Middle East flooded into Gaza to join the Fedayeen headed by Darwish's father, Lt. Col. Mustafa Hafaz. The Fedayeen became the model for modern terrorist organizations, according to Darwish.

Growing up in an environment of intense hatred, Darwish said she witnessed firsthand the death and destruction Fedayeen operations caused. By attending Gaza elementary schools, she and her siblings were indoctrinated with anti-Semitism at an early age. "I learned that hate, vengeance and retaliation are important values to protect Islam and Arab honor," Darwish said, recalling her education as a young girl.

"The severe indoctrination is devastating on children," said Darwish. "Those who end up as terrorists are simply the ones who took their education and upbringing seriously and did what they were told."

In "Now They Call Me Infidel," Darwish also speaks out against the institution of polygamy in Muslim culture and "The same culture that allows Muslim men many outlets for sex - even forced sex - tacitly permits honor killing of women and, in some countries, death by stoning for women who have sex outside of marriage...At all levels of Islamic society, the sharia laws turn the relationship between husband and wife from that of partners to one of slave and master."

Before immigrating to America in 1978, Darwish worked as a journalist in Egypt. She now leads the group Arabs for Israel and lectures around the country.

TopDarwish's talk is free and open to the public. Durham Hall is located in the Aley Fine Arts Center on the Casper College campus.

 

Wednesday, November 7, 2007
T-BIRDS HIT THE ROAD TO COLBY

The Casper College basketball teams will be on the road this weekend at Colby, Kan.

Gary Becker's men's team is coming off a pair of impressive performances at the Wells Fargo Tip Off Classic over the weekend, beating Little Big Horn in record fashion and dispatching a solid Snow College team.

The T-Birds will play Neosho County (Chanute, Kan.) on Thursday (2:30), Colby on Friday (8:30) and Fort Scott CC on Saturday (4:30).

Becker says Josh Davis, the T-Birds' returning all region player from a year ago, will be available this weekend. Davis, who sat out the first two games of the season for disciplinary reasons, sustained a back injury in practice this week and won't be at 100 percent, Becker says.

The CC women's team, which blistered the nets for a team record 115 points on Friday, fell in overtime to North Idaho on Saturday. Coach Angelo Hill says he is hoping for continued improvement from his young team this weekend.
The T-Bird women play Dodge City Thursday (12:30), Pratt College Friday (10:30 a.m.) and Colby on Saturday (2:30).

All the T-Bird games can be heard live on KVOC Radio, 1230 on the AM dial, with Marcus Hayden.

* * * *
The Region IX North champion T-Bird volleyball team continues its preparations for the national tournament, to be held November 15-17 in Council Bluffs, Iowa. The T-Birds' first-round opponent will be Frank Phillips in the double elimination tournament.

 

Monday, November 5, 2007
CONCERT TO FEATURE GLOW IN THE DARK TUNE AT CASPER COLLEGE

Featuring a glow in the dark number, the Casper College Percussion Ensemble will take to the stage on Thursday, Nov. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in Durham Hall.

According to ensemble director Terry Gunderson, the nine-member student group will play some unique and exciting works, including "Geometrics," one of the first percussion pieces written for black light.

The concert will also feature the Casper College Marimba Ensemble, which "will recreate some of the magic of the jazz age by performing ragtime xylophone works by the late, great George Hamilton Green," says Gunderson.

The concert is free and open to all. Durham Hall is located in the Aley Fine Arts Center on the Casper College campus.

 

Monday, November 5, 2007
NEED FOR LANDUSE PLANNING, CHALLENGES OF CLIMATE CHANGE TOPICS OF UW TALKS IN CASPER NOV. 15

The need for long-range, comprehensive land use planning in Wyoming, and the land and water management challenges of climate change here, will be the topic of talks sponsored by the University of Wyoming in Casper on Thursday, Nov. 15.

A professional planner who has worked with the explosive growth in the Pinedale area fueled by the energy industry, and a leading scientist who has done work with tree-ring studies suggesting how dry Wyoming can be and may be again will be the final speakers in the UW/Casper College Center series in Casper.

"Thinking Ahead" will be the sixth and final evening in the series "Delicate Networks: Wyoming's Land and Water and the Decisions Demanded by Growth," at the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center.

The event, free and open to the public, takes place at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 15, in the Wheeler Auditorium, Room 103 of the Wold Physical Science Center on the Casper College campus.

Joanne Garnett, who has been a planner in Sublette County both in local government and now for the private firm Worthington Lenhart and Carpenter, will discuss the significance of comprehensive planning for Wyoming communities, as well as how to build consensus among a wide range of people on what they want for their community.

Steve Jackson, director of the Program in Ecology for the UW Botany Department in Laramie, will discuss long-term climate and climate change in Wyoming, and the risks and challenges that current climate change poses for land and water management here.

UW's "Delicate Networks" series examines the intricate water-land connections that sustain Wyoming's much-loved landscapes, and the ease with which development can disrupt those connections. It also explores how Wyoming people are seeking to protect those networks when dealing with development, especially residential growth.

Development issues affecting land and water in a number of communities including Casper, Buffalo, Cheyenne, Laramie, and Pinedale have been addressed by guest speakers from those communities and from the University of Wyoming.

The series is sponsored by UW's Helga Otto Haub School and William Ruckelshaus TopInstitute of Environment and Natural Resources, the UW/CC Center, the UW Outreach School, and the Casper Star-Tribune.

 

Monday, November 5, 2007
FLYING SQUIRRELS TOPIC OF PRESENTATION AT CASPER COLLEGE

University of Wyoming zoology doctoral candidate Liz Flaherty will give a presentation on research that she has conducted on flying squirrels in Alaska on Tuesday, Nov. 6 at 7:30 p.m.

Her presentation, "Flight Delay 50-100 Years: Effects of Timber Harvest on Northern Flying Squirrel Movements in Southeast Alaska," will examine research that Flaherty says "will predict movement patterns and the viability of flying squirrels using fine-scale movement, energetics, and diet data incorporated into an individually-based, spatially-explicit dispersal model coupled with the current harvest configuration for Prince of Wales Island" she says.

"If flying squirrel movement is affected by loss of old-growth habitat in rainforests of Southeast Alaska and squirrels are unable to adequately disperse because energetic costs are too great, or second-growth and clear cuts lack food items, flying squirrel populations in the Tongass (National Forest) will not exist as a functioning metapopulation," Flaherty adds.

Flaherty's presentation is part of the Zimmerman Lecture Series and is sponsored in part by the Casper College Biology Department and the University of Wyoming/Casper College Center.

The presentation is free and open to the public and will take place in the Wheeler Auditorium located in the Wold Physical Science Center on the Casper College campus.

 

Thursday, November 1, 2007
LOUCKS SELECTED AS 2007-2008 STUCKENHOFF RECIPIENT

Casper College nursing faculty member Heidi Loucks has been chosen as the Stuckenhoff Endowed Nursing Faculty for the 2007-2008 school year.

"Heidi has been a valued faculty member in the nursing program and an asset to Casper College in many ways," says Heather Huber, last year's recipient of the Stuckenhoff endowed position.

The first of the Casper College nursing faculty to earn recognition as a Certified Nurse Educator, Loucks has also participated as an item writer for the NCLEX-RN, the national exam for registered nurses.

"Heidi Loucks will serve us well as the Stuckenhoff Endowed Chair in the nursing department," says Carmen Simone, vice president of academic affairs at Casper College. "We have a fantastic nursing faculty at Casper College - they are a dedicated team of professional educators. Heidi works well within this team environment and also strives to make an impact outside of her department. She is a tireless advocate for students and a tremendous asset to Casper College," Simone adds.

"Whenever there has been a shortage of instructors or new faculty in need of assistance, Heidi has always been there to fill the void. She is a true team player giving support and encouragement of those around her, She is a dependable colleague whose opinions and ideas are held in high regard, and she has the respect and admiration of her peers.

Heidi holds herself to the highest standards of care and education, loyally advocating for nurses and for nursing students that they may endeavor to give their best to those in need," says Huber.

I feel extremely honored to be selected as this year's Stuckenhoff Endowed Chair, and I am ever-grateful to Dr. Stuckenhoff and his family for their generosity. Because of the Stuckenhoff gift, we have been able to heighten our students' educational experiences in nursing, in addition to honoring nursing faculty members on an annual basis, says Loucks.

In April of 1997, the Casper College Foundation announced that former Casper physician H.E. "Doc" Stuckenhoff had left a $1 million gift earmarked for the benefit of the Casper College nursing program.

The endowed nursing facility position began with the 1998-99 school year. "This is an honorary position - no money is involved," says Jolene Knaus, health science division chair. Funds saved because of the endowed position go back into the college's general fund for salaries and benefits.

Loucks has been teaching at Casper College since August 2000. She received her TopA.D.N. in nursing from Casper College, her B.S. in hospitality management from North Dakota State University and her M.S.N. in nursing from University of Wyoming.

Thursday, December 20, 2007
TWO UW/CC COURSES OPEN FOR CREDIT/NONCREDIT ENROLLMENT

The University of Wyoming Outreach School's Division of Community Service Education (CSE) will be offering several seats for noncredit participants in two courses offered through the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center this spring. Through the integration of credit and noncredit courses, community members can now take these interesting classes without testing, grades, or admission to the university.

"Writer's Workshop in Non-Fiction" (ENGL 4050), taught by English instructor David Zoby, will cover both literary nonfiction and magazine writing, discussing the writing process all the way to publication. An entire session will be devoted to selling and marketing the work.

The second course, "Business and Communication" (COJO 3010), will study theories and techniques of professional communication activities including interviewing skills, group processes, and professional presentations.

"Effective communication skills are vital for success in business and professional settings," said Carol Tarantola, senior lecturer of communication at the UW/CC Center. "We will practice business etiquette, resume writing, interviewing, small group teamwork, oral presentations, listening, and interpersonal relationship skills, providing an opportunity to improve communication. The classroom provides an excellent training ground for improvement on the job."
Senior citizens will find these noncredit options beneficial because they do not have to enroll in the university to take them, said Sheila Couture, director of CSE.

Registration for these courses is open through January 1. For more information, contact Outreach School Division of Community Service Education at 1-877-733-3618 extension 5.

 

Monday, December 17, 2007
SUCCESSFUL FUNDRAISER BENEFITS JOSHUA'S STOREHOUSE

The Round Table Honor Society at the University of Wyoming/Casper College (UW/CC) Center raised $2,035 through a raffle to benefit Joshua's Storehouse in Casper. Dale Hanson of Green River won the snow blower, valued at $700, which was donated by Elmer Pace of Dayton Transmission and Chad Nelson of Nelico Equipment.

In addition to the money earned through the sale of raffle tickets, the honor society has applied for a matching community grant from Walmart.

"If the grant is approved, Walmart will match our donation up to $1,000," said Natalie Pique, a UW/CC Center psychology major and treasurer of the Round Table Honor Society.
"We would like to thank our sponsors, Dayton Transmission and Nelico Equipment, as well as all of the people who purchased raffle tickets; the faculty and staff at the UW/CC Center; and all the members of the Round Table who participated in the fundraiser, especially Annette Green, who arranged the snow blower donation and sold the most raffle tickets," added Pique.

The funds raised by the honor society will help to buy gifts and incidentals for Casper families in need.

 

Monday, December 3, 2007
MATH/SCIENCE TEACHER'S WORKSHOP OFFERED

A unique chance for K-16 math and science educators to receive hands-on training with the latest technology and integrate that technology in the classroom will take place at Casper College on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 11 and 12.

The "6th Annual Wyoming Math and Science Teachers' Professional Development Conference: Making Math and Science Connections," is open to all K-16 math and science teachers, according to Kenyne Schlager, event coordinator and workforce specialist at Casper College.

"Math and science teachers are encouraged to come learn about best practices and new technologies for teaching math and science and to explore the possibilities with their colleagues, state officials, and national speakers," says Schlager.

This year's keynote speaker is Mike Francis portraying Galileo in "The Amazing Discoveries of Galileo Galileo." "Mike will portray Galileo using over 30 years of professional acting experience on stage, film, and television. A physical science and physics teacher and formerly a lecturer for 10 years at the Charles Hayden Planetarium at Boston's Museum of Science, Mike combines the science of astronomy with the dramatic skills of an actor. His presentation will provide an innovative and entertaining look at math and science," Schlager says.

With 50 different topics to choose from, attendees can participate in up to seven 50-minute hands-on lessons and demonstrations each day, including workshops on: "DNA and Biotech for the Classroom," "A Chemistry Lab to Dye for," "Geometric Reasoning with Sketchpad," Using Probeware to Make Data Real," "Arsenic Contamination as a Real-World Science Problem," and many others.

The conference is organized and supported by the Wyoming Science Teachers Association (WSTA), and the Wyoming Council of Teachers of Mathematics (WCTM). Sponsors include Casper College, WY NASA Space Grant Consortium, University of Wyoming, Scholastic Inc., McGraw-Hill, Teton Science Schools, McDougal Littell, It's About Time, and Wyoming Stream Team.

Registration fees are $150 before the conference, and $175 at the door; lunch will be provided both days. For more information contact Schlager at 268-3847 or log onto www.caspercollege.edu/events/mst/index.html.

 

Monday, December 3, 2007
"SEASONALLY STEAMROLLED" CONCERT SET FOR DURHAM

The Casper College Concert Band will present what Director Doug Bull calls a "Seasonally Steamrolled" concert on Sunday, Dec. 16 at 3 p.m.

The concert will be "steamrolled" because the band will be performing three selections from the popular recording group Manheim Steamroller. Those three selections are: "Fanfare and Hark, The Herald Angels Sing," "Away in a Manger," and "Angels We Have Heard On High."

Adding to the holiday spirit the concert will also "include interesting and exciting settings of traditional seasonal music and everyone's favorite; Leroy Anderson's "Sleigh Ride," says Bull.

TopAdmission is free, "just bring your holiday spirit," notes Bull. The concert will take place in Durham Hall, located in the Aley Fine Arts Center on the Casper College campus.

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