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Communication is the basis for all relationships and is the key to success in our personal, social, and professional lives.  A Communication degree helps students further develop their knowledge and skills in a variety of areas within the discipline. Click here for career options utilizing a degree in Communication.

The Associate of Arts in Communication is designed so students may choose the emphasis area that best suits their needs and interests.  All students working toward an Associate of Arts in Communication degree are required to take 9 credit hours of core courses in Communication: CO/M 1000 Introduction to Mass Media, CO/M 1040 Introduction to Human Communication, and CO/M 1010 Public Speaking OR CO/M 1030 Interpersonal Communication.

CommunicationStudents may choose to focus on one of three emphasis areas in the communication field:

  • Human Communication
  • Journalism
  • Media Studies

Human Communication emphasis focuses on human communication theory and research, as well as applied skills in diverse communication settings and interactions, preparing students for any profession or career or for transfer to a four year institution.  The Human Communication emphasis is relevant for those seeking careers or further education in administration, business, counseling, education, health services,leadership, the ministry, and government and social services, to note a few. 

Offering crucial foundation courses in Journalism, the Journalism emphasis prepares students for a print media career or for further study in Journalism at a four year institution.  A third choice is the Multimedia emphasis which offers students flexibility in their course of study with courses that give students a foundation for a career or for further study in print, video, radio, and /or web media, depending on the students’ interests and needs.

Both the Journalism and Media Studies emphases are relevant for students seeking careers in such fields as advertising, news reporting and editing, marketing, public information, radio or television, sales, and media production, as well as many other areas of the media and performing arts. 

#34 bannerAll emphasis areas offer students opportunities for skill development in workshops, in cooperative learning courses, and in service learning experiences.

In addition to excellent classes, the Communication department offers a variety of activities for students and faculty:

  • A nationally ranked forensics program affiliated with Phi Rho Pi, Cross-Examination Debate Association, American Forensics Association and National Parliamentary Debate Association
  • Chinook student newspaper
  • Expression magazine
  • internships at local TV and radio stations, and newspapers
  • Faculty Associations - Western States Communication Association, Phi Rho Pi, AFA, PBA.
Contact Information:

Crystal Sosalla
Academic Assistant
307-268-2368
LH 166
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Terry Rogers
Department Head
(307) 268-2648
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  • Jessica Hurless
    • Phone: (307) 268-2660
    • Office: KT 147
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  • Doug Hall
    • Phone: (307) 268-2496
    • Office: KT 146
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  • Peter Van Houten
    • Phone: (307) 268-2375
    • Office: CE 106
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  • Terry Rogers
    • Phone: (307) 268-2648
    • Office: KT 144
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  • Gretchen Wheeler
    • Phone: (307) 268-2390
    • Office: KT 143
    • Weblink

ASL 1200 - American Sign Language I (4L,4CR)
This course will provide beginning level knowledge of American Sign Language, fingerspelling, deafness, and deaf culture. Emphasis will be on developing receptive and expressive language skills within the parameters of sign language using the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language 5C’s to include: Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparisons and Community.

ASL 1220 - American Sign Language II (4L,4CR)
This course will provide intermediate level instruction in American Sign Language, fingerspelling, deafness, and deaf culture. Emphasis will be on developing receptive and expressive language skills within the parameters of sign language.
Prerequisites: Successful completion (C or better) of ASL 1200.

ASL 2200 - American Sign Language III (4L,4CR)
This course will provide advanced level instruction in American Sign Language, fingerspelling, deafness and deaf culture. Emphasis will be on developing receptive and expressive language skills within the parameters of sign language using the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language 5 C’s to include: Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparisons and Community. This course will continue developing American Sign Language. Advanced vocabulary and ASL grammar will be taught and reinforced through classroom presentations and activities, cultural models and visual media presentation. Discussions will focus on deafness, deaf history, current trends and related topics. The direct experience method (using ASL with no voice) will be used to enhance language acquisition.
Prerequisites: Successful completion (C or better) of ASL 1220.

ASL 2220 - American Sign Language IV (4L,4CR)
This course will continue advanced level instruction in American Sign Language, fingerspelling, deafness and deaf culture. Emphasis will be on receptive and expressive language skills within the parameters of sign language using the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language 5 C’s to include: Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparisons and Community. This course will continue developing American Sign Language. Advanced vocabulary and ASL grammar will be taught and reinforced through classroom presentations and activities, cultural models and visual media presentations. Discussions will focus on deafness, deaf history, current trends and related topics. The direct experience method (using ASL with no voice) will be used to enhance language acquisition.
Prerequisites: Successful completion (C or better) of ASL 2200 or equivalent coursework.

CO/M 1000 Introduction to Mass Media (3L,3CR)[E][CS]:
Explores the nature and function of the mass media in contemporary society. Begins by examining some major theoretical conceptions of the communication process, concentrating on how communication creates and sustains culture. Other topics include the effects of the media on media consumers, special characteristics of the various media, and public policy issues in regard to mass media.

CO/M 1010 Public Speaking (3L,3CR)[E][O]:
An introductory course in public speaking. The emphasis is on theory, speech development, and practice as the student is introduced to a variety of speaking situations from impromptu talks to platform speeches.

CO/M 1030 Interpersonal Communication (3L,3CR)[E]:
Focuses on face-to-face relationships in interpersonal communication settings. Self-concept, perception, language, nonverbal channels, listening, and emotions are presented as factors in dyadic relationships.

CO/M 1040 Introduction to Human Communication (3L,3CR)[E] [CS]:
An introduction to the nature and function of human symbolic communication in its various settings. The role of symbolic communication on the interpersonal level as a method of establishing and defining human relationships will be examined, as will the relationship of symbolic communication to the establishment and maintenance of larger behavioral, economic, and cultural processes and structures.

CO/M 1060 Forensics I (2LB,1CR):
For those students interested in competing in events sponsored by the National Community College Speech Association.

CO/M 1080 Talking With: (Subtitle) (1L,1CR) (Max. 3):
This course will focus on unique or specific communication situations, for which there are often special strategies or rules for effective communication. It may be repeated under different topics to a maximum of three credits.

CO/M 1200 Beginning Sign Language (4L,4CR):
This course will provide beginning level knowledge of American Sign Language, fingerspelling, deafness, and deaf culture. Emphasis will be on developing receptive and expressive language skills within the parameters of sign language.  CO/M 1200 fulfills the General Education requirement for Communications. (Dual listing ASL 1200.)

CO/M 1220 Intermediate Sign Language (4L,4CR):
This course, a continuation of CO/M 1200, will provide intermediate level knowledge of American Sign Language, its vocabulary, grammar, fingerspelling, spatial concepts, deafness and current topics in deaf culture and literature. CO/M 1220 fulfills the General Education requirement for Communications. Prerequisite: CO/M 1200 or ASL 1200, or permission of the instructor. (Dual listing ASL 1220.)

CO/M 1505 Communication for Professional Success (1-3L,1-3CR):
A practical approach to improving communication in the workplace. This course presents principles and practices for business and professional employees in three areas: personal skills (Interpersonal Communication), group skills (Small Group Communication), and presentation skills (Public Speaking and Interviewing). The course may be taken for three credits as a whole, or individually for one credit each.

CO/M 2060 Forensics II (2LB,1CR) (Max. 2):
For those interested in competing in those events sponsored by Phi Rho Pi, the national community college speech association. Students will attend and participate in intercollegiate forensics as members of the forensics squad of Casper College. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Students may take this course only twice.

CO/M 2090 Introduction to Persuasion (3L,3CR)[E]:
Human communication as a change agent is studied along with relationships of attitudes to behavior with emphasis on behavioral research and contemporary theories. Prerequisite: CO/M 1040 or 1030.

CO/M 2100 Reporting and Newswriting I (2L,2LB,3CR)[E] [WB]:
Learning the meaning of news, beginning newswriting, development of news sources, selection and organization of information, variations in types of news, the developments and trends of journalistic forms, and social and legal responsibilities of the press. Practice in gathering and writing news. Preparation of articles for campus newspaper. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1010 and ability to type.

CO/M 2110 Nonverbal Communication (3L,3CR)[E]:
Students will have practical opportunities to study the influence of nonverbal factors in communication. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010.

CO/M 2120 Small Group Communication (3L,3CR)[E]:
Communication behavior in small group situations is explored; networks, dynamics, leadership roles, member functions, and decision-making behavior. Prerequisite: CO/M 1040 or 1030.

CO/M 2125 Family Communication (3L,3CR):
Designed to explore the role that communication plays in family functioning. Prerequisite: CO/M 1030.

CO/M 2130 Introduction to Film Studies (2L,2LB,3CR):
Introduction to film esthetics and critical approaches to studying and writing about film. Includes examination of photography, production, scripting, sound, composition as well as theoretical and social concerns.

CO/M 2135 Gender, Communication and Culture (3L,3CR):
This course provides both a theoretical and real-life view, for both genders, on how our communication in work, school, social and relationship settings help shape and design our gender constructs.

CO/M 2150 Argumentation (3L,3CR)[E]:
Principles of argumentation are presented with emphasis on reasoning, evidence, case construction, and effective presentation in bringing about belief and conviction. Application by participation in debates and discussions on various social and political questions. Prerequisite: CO/M 1010, ENGL 1010, or consent of the instructor.

CO/M 2170 Beginning Broadcast Writing (3L,3CR)[E]:
Techniques of writing, interviewing and delivering news stories for radio and television. Practice in gathering and producing broadcast news.

CO/M 2190 Basic Video Production (2L,2LB,3CR):
Basic camera operation, sound, lighting, scriptwriting, planning, budgeting, and editing introduce the fundamentals of corporate and educational single-camera video production. Students will work in a variety of crew positions to create private or institutional videotapes.

CO/M 2200 Broadcast Production (2L,2LB,3CR)[E]:
Introduction to the fundamental technical and production concepts in radio, television, and motion pictures. Actual experience with equipment and an understanding of its operation are emphasized. Prerequisite: CO/M 2190 or permission of the instructor.

CO/M 2260 Interviewing (3L,3CR)[E]:
Principles and methods of imparting information through interviewing in both private and public situations will be explained. Students will study and practice techniques employed in professional situations. Prerequisite: CO/M 1030 or 1040.

CO/M 2340 Editing and Production (3L,3CR):
Evaluation, selection and preparation of news copy for publication. Practice in copy reading, proof reading, headline writing, and page layout. Use of photography and advertising in page layout. Prerequisite: CO/M 2100.

CO/M 2355 Introduction to Media Photography (2L,2LB,3CR):
This course is designed for students to gain a general understanding of digital camera operation and the development of photojournalism and its role in a visually-oriented world. Students will used both film and digital cameras for their photographs and will learn how to manipulate them in Adobe Photoshop. Prerequisite: CO/M 2100, or permission the of instructor.

CO/M 2370 Independent Video Production (1-2CR) (Max. 2):
With approval of the instructor, the student designs and implements one or more independent or institutionally-related video projects. Prerequisite: CO/M 2230.

CO/M 2380 Cinema History (2L,2LB,3CR)[E]:
A study of the development of film from 1895 to the present in relation to historical forces shaping the film industry in the form of artistic movements, world history, popular taste, technology, economics, and politics. Weekly screening of historically significant films supplement readings, lectures, and discussions. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010.

CO/M 2390 Independent Publications (2LB,1CR) (Max. 3):
Students interested in work on the newspaper or the literary/art magazine will work in advertising, photography, records, circulation, editorial and or writing/editing. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CO/M 2410 Multimedia Authoring I (2L,2LB,3CR):
An introduction to multimedia authoring. The basics of manipulating sound, text, images and video in the digital realm will be investigated and practiced. A variety of authoring tools will be introduced and each student will design and produce a desktop computer interactive multimedia project.

CO/M 2471 Communication Internship (1-3CR):
This course is designed for students wishing to gain work experience using communication skills. This is an unpaid internship. The student will complete 80 hours of work for 1 credit hour. The student will be evaluated by his/her supervisor at work as well as via several visits from the instructor.

CO/M 2472 Television Production Internship (1-3CR):
The student will be assigned to one or more television stations for experience in camera operation, switching, and field and studio production. The first eight weeks is a period of observing the total studio operation. The second eight weeks at the discretion of the instructor and studio supervisor, will be a continuation at the same studio or a relocation to another studio. Three to four student/instructor/supervisor conferences will be scheduled. This is an unpaid work experience. Prerequisite: CO/M 2200 and permission of the instructor.

CO/M 2473 Multimedia Production Internship (1-3CR):
The internship gives the student exposure to multimedia production work through first hand experience. Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in the communication department and permission of the instructor.

CO/M 2474 Publications Practicum (1-3CR):
A review and evaluation of an approved internship experience with a mass communications medium of related agency or department. Students should gain actual experience in news gathering and production for professional medium. The first eight weeks is a period of observing the total news production operation. The second eight weeks, at the discretion of the instructor and media supervisor, will be a continuation at the same medium or a relocation to another medium. Three to four student/ instructor/supervisor conferences will be scheduled. This is an unpaid work experience. Prerequisite: CO/M 2100 or permission of the instructor.

CO/M 2475 Independent Study (1-3CR) (Max. 6):
An opportunity for students to develop projects in their particular area of interest within the communication discipline. Prerequisite: CO/M 1040, consent of instructor, and completion of at least six hours of 2000 level CO/M credits.

CO/M 2480 Cooperative Work Experience (1-3CR) (Max. 6):
Laboratory work consists of paid on-the-job training independently arranged and accompanied by academic instruction. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in CO/M 2100 and permission of the instructor.

CO/M 2482 Cooperative Work Experience: Walt Disney World (12LB,6CR):
This course is designed for students spending the semester at Walt Disney World in their internship program. Students will be expected to maintain a log of their work experiences and may be required to write a paper describing what they have learned about communication. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CO/M 2483 Cooperative Work Experience: Organizational Culture (1CR):
Students who take the Disney College Program Practicum Course will be given one credit of this 2000-level communication elective towards their degree. Documentation of successful completion of the Disney Program will be required. (Pass/Fail only)

CO/M 2484 Communication for Disney Interns (1CR):
This course is available only to students who have been selected by the Disney Corporation to serve as interns in the Disney World Program and are concurrently enrolled in the Disney College Program Public Speaking course. Students will be given a brief introduction to the skills necessary for effective public speaking. This course is not equivalent to the on-campus Public Speaking (CO/M 1010) course. Prerequisite: selection for Disney World Internship and permission of the instructor. (Pass/Fail only)

CO/M 2490 Topics: (Subtitle) (1-3CR):
Independent study and research reserved for students who have successfully completed six hours of 2000 level communication courses. Topics must meet with the approval of the instructor and proceed under direct supervision.

CO/M 2495 Workshop: (Subtitle) (.5-3CR) (Max. 12):
Offered in response to needs and interests of students and members of the community. The topics vary but focus on developing an understanding and acquiring fundamental skills in producing mass media materials. Professionals from the mass media may be featured during the workshops. A student may repeat this course under different subtitles to a maximum of 12 credit hours.

Award-Winning Speech & Debate Team

Some people fear it more than death...

the talking T-Birds do it for fun!

2013-14 Forensic Team

Members of the Casper College Forensics Team compete in a variety of events sponsored by the American Forensics Association (AFA), Phi Rho Pi (PRP), and the National Parliamentary Debate Association (NPDA).  Members of the team range from very experienced to those who have never competed in forensics.  The team travels to approximately 4-5 tournaments per semester in the Rocky Mountain region (Montana, Wyoming, Colorado), culminating with competition at the Phi Rho Pi Community College National Tournament in April.  The team also participates in competition at the International Forensics Association tournament.  These tournaments have been held in locations such as Spain, the Czech Republic, Agentina, England, and Germany. 

Students have the opportunity to compete in Limited Preparation events (Impromptu, Extemporaneous Speaking), Platform events (Persuasive Speaking, Informative Speaking, Communication Analysis, After Dinner Speaking), Interpretation events (Dramatic Interp, Prose Interp, Poetry Interp, Program Oral Interp, Dramatic Duo Interp), Lincoln-Douglas Debate, and Parliamentary Debate.

Team members are required to maintain a 2.5 GPA, with a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester, and enroll in CO/M 1060 for the first semester of participation (CO/M 2060 in the second year).  For students interested in competing on the team, please contact Doug Hall, Director of Individual Events for scholarship applications and more information.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Who can join the forensics team?
    Any Casper College Student, with twelve or more credits, no prior experience is required. Talk to the coaches about securing your spot on the team!!!

  • Why would I want to join the Forensics team?
    Because speech is an excellent way to develop interpersonal communication skills, you will be able to meet many people from all over the United States, Employers look for people who can demonstrate good communication skills, you will be able to see many college campuses around our region.

  • How do I join the Forensics Team?
    Contact a coach.

  • Affiliations:
    AFA logoThe NPDA logo The art of speech persuasion logo

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There are numerous opportunities within the School of Social & Behavioral Sciences at Casper College. The school is comprised of 13 departments including: Addictionology, Anthropology, Communication, Criminal Justice, Economics, Education, History, International Studies, Paralegal Studies, Political Science, Pre-Law, Psychology, and Sociology (which includes Social Work).

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